Dreaming Pigs Lynne Carver's Comment

Xenotransplants do not only divide the scientific community. I take it from your remark that you work within this community, or are otherwise closely related to its viewpoint. The majority of mankind do not fit within that group. Religious communities, political ones, ethnic ones, and on and on, all are divided by the concept of the possible future being brought, some would even say forced, upon them. The book was written to look into people not in the scientific community, and their possible reactions to results not of the choosing of anyone in any community.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dreaming Pigs Lynne Carver's Comment

The transfer of pathogens, while common in contemporary literature, and news programs, are not the only controversies involved in this process. The very act itself is controversial to some. Perhaps even many. How many governments in Europe are today banning the importation of genetically altered foodstuffs? Even countries literally starving in Africa have just this week refused the delivery of such items because of both fear and moral reasons. You might not agree with them, but their viewpoints exist none the less. Hundreds of millions, Buddhists, Hindus, Taoist, and even some Christian sects disagree with the xenotransplant concept from a moral viewpoint. You may find their viewpoints foolish or ill informed. They find them solid and vitally important. This book hopes to stimulate at least an internal thoughtful consideration by the reader of the moral consequences of this new process.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dreaming Pigs Lynne Carver's Comment

In early drafts her name actually was Dr. Mengele-Goules. In the manner common to early literature by writers like Charles Dickens, John Bunyan and countless others with an aid to the reader as to the individual's guiding persona. While it has fallen from favor of late, it seemed an easy device to delineate a point of view which I adhere to.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dreaming Pigs Lynne Carver's Comment

Exactly my point. You seem dismissive of the great points of philosophical thought that have driven human thought, and might I even add progress(?), through centuries. During today's instant deferral to the scientific viewpoint, those questions of who we are, why are we here, what is right or wrong, are being deferred to the driving question "Can it be done?". This is indeed the thrust of this novel. It is sub-text, I grant you, but it is one of the reasons this book exists.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dreaming Pigs Lynne Carver's Comment

Why not "potential benefits"? Clearly such benefits are in the future if they are to exist at all. Well yes, a few, limited experiments and some transplants of some veins and valves. But the concept of xenotransplant from gene altered animals for human transplants are yet to be realized and may not be. I often read with a mixture of concern and humor to demands by scientists to use human embryos for testing using that same argument, as if the benefits are a forgone conclusion. Are you old enough to remember the promise that nuclear power plants would create electricity so cheaply that we would not even have power meters on our homes? Or that the shuttle would be like a truck, making weekly trips into orbit? So many other examples could be named that the mind reels. Again I read into your review, a viewpoint of the innate goodness of this process, or at least the lack of potential harm, that it seems likely my explanation will only increase your dislike for my viewpoint. Still, it must be asked, by many people, in many ways, Is this good? Are animals here just for the benefit of people? Is science for science sake a sane viewpoint, given the history of the past century? Do the people involved in these experiments consider, or even care that they could unleash a horror on the planet such as has seldom been seen? Do they even consider the possibility that they could be doing the wrong thing? Perhaps. Surely all sorts of people with all sorts of views are involved. But logically, those involved must think that any good outweighs any bad. I would just like to stimulate some deeper personal thinking on the morality of such actions. Not the science.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dreaming Pigs Lynne Carver's Comment

The source of the "apparent" increase in intelligence is immaterial to the point of the story, from my viewpoint. The scientific explanation you seek, may or may not be possible. What is intelligence? Man took his superiority for granted for ages. Yet as we learn more and more about animal behavior the distinctions made in the past are falling by the wayside. Tools were once considered the sine qua non of superiority. Not only have we found chimps using tools, but now stone age chimps are known to exist and even a crow has been observed to create and use a tool. Language is now understood to exist among whales, dolphins, and elephants. How will we decide if any life on other worlds is "intelligent" if they, like the whales, have no need for artifacts, and their language is indecipherable to humans? Will we treat them like equals or like food? The very question of "intelligence" and what constitutes it, is also core to the point of this novel. I want you, and any other readers to question within yourself these concepts, and I hope that it would come without my pounding out the point so that it was obvious to all. Perhaps I was too reticent to speak to this, and should have been more forthright. But I think to hint is better than to shout, especially when I would prefer to drive the story with the questions, rather than vice versa.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dreaming Pigs Lynne Carver's Comment

I'm glad that someone is positive that no mistakes will ever be made, or that some lunatic will never attempt an Island of Lost Souls scenario. Permit me to doubt.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dreaming Pigs Lynne Carver's Comment

I felt the actions of the humans, on both sides of the question was sufficient commentary. The existence of the pigs and their condition in and of itself is hopefully enough driving force to stimulate an internal dialogue by the reader.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dreaming Pigs Lynne Carver's Comment

As to the comments on the likelihood of authorities in capturing the fugitives, I would merely refer you to Richard Jewell the formerly accused and Eric Robert Rudolph the presently accused Atlanta Bomber, the Uni-bomber, numerous serial killers like the Green River Killer, the Hillside Strangler, The Zodiac Killer, etc., the difficulty in regaining any car stolen in this country, the devastating abduction and murder of children lately, and so on and so on. Again, permit me to doubt the skills and abilities of those in charge. Sometimes they do well, and all credit to them when they do. Many times they don't.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dreaming Pigs Lynne Carver's Comment

Well, yes. I hoped that some humor would seep through this and I hoped this would put any potential reader on their guard so that they would be clued into my intent.


Clearly we approach this from different points. Please do not misunderstand mine. I do not view science as evil. I am eternally grateful for anesthesia, antibiotics, modern communications, good transportation and on and on. I am not as thrilled with atomic bombs, poison gas, thalidomide babies, and on and on. I would just like everyone to try to tell the difference.