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Other Books
Over My Head (2013)
The Cats of Tanglewood Forest (2013)
Under My Skin (2012)
The Painted Boy (2010)
The Very Best of Charles de Lint (2010)
Muse and Reverie (2009)
Eyes Like Leaves (2009)
The Mystery of Grace (2009)
Woods and Waters Wild (2009)
Yellow Dog (2008)
What the Mouse Found (2008)
Dingo (2008)
Little (Grrl) Lost (2007)
Old Man Crow (2007)
Promises to Keep (2007)
Widdershins (2006)
Triskell Tales 2 (2006)
Make A Joyful Noise (2006)
The Hour Before Dawn (2005)
Quicksilver & Shadow (2005)
The Blue Girl (2004)
Medicine Road (2004)
Refinerytown (2003)
Spirits in the Wires (2003)
A Handful of Coppers (2003)
A Circle of Cats (2003)
Tapping the Dream Tree (2002)
Waifs and Strays (2002)
Seven Wild Sisters (2002)
The Onion Girl (2001)
The Road to Lisdoonvarna (2001)
Triskell Tales (2000)
Forests of the Heart (2000)
The Buffalo Man (1999)
The Newford Stories (1999)
Moonlight and Vines (1999)
Someplace to be Flying (1998)
Trader (1997)
Jack of Kinrowan (1997)
The Ivory and the Horn (1995)
Memory & Dream (1994)
The Wild Wood (1994)
Into the Green (1993)
The Wishing Well (1993)
Dreams Underfoot (1993)
I'll Be Watching You (1992)
From a Whisper to a Scream (1992)
Merlin Dreams in the Mondream Wood (1992)
Spiritwalk (1992)
Paperjack (1991)
Our Lady of the Harbour (1991)
Hedgework and Guessery (1991)
Death Leaves an Echo (1991)
Ghosts of Wind and Shadow (1991)
Uncle Dobbin's Parrot Fair (1991)
The Little Country (1991)
The Dreaming Place (1990)
Angel of Darkness (1990)
Ghostwood (1990)
Drink Down the Moon (1990)
The Fair in Emain Macha (1990)
Philip José Farmer's The Dungeon: The Hidden City (1990)
Westlin Wind (1989)
Berlin (1989)
Philip José Farmer's The Dungeon: The Valley of Thunder (1989)
Svaha (1989)
Wolf Moon (1988)
Greenmantle (1988)
Jack the Giant-Killer (1987)
Ascian in Rose (1987)
Yarrow: An Autumn Tale (1986)
Mulengro: A Romany Tale (1985)
The Harp of the Grey Rose (1985)
Moonheart: A Romance (1984)
The Riddle of the Wren (1984)
De Grijze Roos (1983)
Memory & Dream
Memory and Dream
Triskell Press

Memory & Dream
Orb

Memory & Dream
Tor

Twenty years previous, a woman whose artistic power brought to life the images she painted turned her back on her talent when the forces she unleashed brought tragedy to loved ones, but now she is being drawn back to the nightmare in order to fulfill a promise to a long-dead friend.
Source: Book Cover

Reviews
Green Man Review:
Using the colorful, mythical North American city of Newford as his background, de Lint draws up a rich tapestry of myth and magic, using painting-and, on a deeper level, creation-as a metaphor throughout the book. Following the life of starving artist Isabelle Copley, de Lint confronts head on the harsh realities of denial, abusive relationships, suicide and ultimately, responsibility for one's own actions.

Told partly in the present, partly in flashback, Isabelle's life is fascinating in a frustrating way. De Lint refuses to clue the reader in on significant past events-such as the death of Katharine Mully-instead doling out piecemeal fragments of the story indirectly, colored by Isabelle's perceptions. It's a literary trick that works quite well, involving the reader as well as any mystery, an extended foreplay that's as maddening as it is ultimately satisfying. Which is fine for mainstream fiction, but de Lint readers expect a healthy dose of the fantastic to go with their prose. And de Lint delivers, eschewing gnomes and pixies.

What if, he ponders, there exist non-corporeal beings, numena, who are able to take on form through the act of creation that goes into a painting? A being that is, by nature, very fey, but not of faerie-unless, of course, the painting it took its form from was of such a work.

Added to this potent mix is enigmatic master painter Vincent Rushkin. A troll of a man who is alternately foul and fair, Rushkin takes Isabelle on as a student, teaching her how to unlock her true potential as an artist, as well as her hidden talent to bring forth numena. But Rushkin's attentions raise questions of their own. How does he know of Isabelle's talent? And are these numena real in their own right, or are they merely manifestations of her fertile artist's imagination? And what happens to one if its painting is destroyed?

Needless to say, de Lint answers all the questions he poses-at least as much as some fundamental questions can be answered. Fans of de Lint's short fiction will no doubt find this novel to their liking, and de Lint stocks the supporting cast with his usual on-the-fringes-of-society artistic types, including the popular Jilly Coppercorn and Geordie Riddell.

From Booklist, American Library Association, October 1994:
It is hard to imagine urban fantasy done better than it is by de Lint at his best, and this book shows his imagination and craft at their highest levels. De Lint's folkloric scholarship is as outstanding as ever; he never lets it slide into academicism or pretension… Memory and Dream deserves the highest recommendation and the widest readership.

From The Edmonton Journal, October 1994:
Easily Canada's top fantasy scribe…a major international force in the genre. Here is a biped who has steadfastly avoided stereotyping in his work from the beginning…de Lint has developed a considerable talent for injecting magic into everyday contemporary life.

From Quill & Quire, January 1995:
De Lint takes a hard look at reality in Memory and Dream, especially at the personal burdens we all carry. He seamlessly blends urban landscapes, with all their sometimes ugly complications, with a magic that feels so true it's hard not to believe he knows something the rest of us don't.

Folk Tales:
If there is an inherent flaw within the sub-genre of urban fantasy, it lies in the fact that many writers rely too heavily on established mythology. The familiar fantasy becomes a crutch, and holds the story back from fulfilling its true potential. The punk-rocker elf has become a cliché, as has the dragon living in the sewer. In Memory & Dream, Canadian fantasist Charles de Lint avoids this pitfall, and in doing so, sets himself apart from the crowd with his most complex, engaging and artistically challenging novel to date.

Using the colorful, mythical North American city of Newford as his background, de Lint draws up a rich tapestry of myth and magic, using painting-and, on a deeper level, creation-as a metaphor throughout the book. Following the life of starving artist Isabelle Copley, de Lint confronts head on the harsh realities of denial, abusive relationships, suicide and ultimately, responsibility for one's own actions. Told partly in the present, partly in flashback, Isabelle's life is fascinating in a frustrating way. De Lint refuses to clue the reader in one significant past events-such as the death of Katharine Mully-instead doling out piecemeal fragments of the story indirectly, colored by Isabelle's perceptions. It's a literary trick that works quite well, involving the reader as well as any mystery, an extended foreplay that's as maddening as it is ultimately satisfying.

Which is fine for mainstream fiction, but de Lint readers expect a healthy dose of the fantastic to go with their prose. And de Lint delivers, eschewing gnomes and pixies. What if, he ponders, there exist non-corporeal beings, numena, who are able to take on form through the act of creation that goes into a painting? A being that is, by nature, very fey, but not of faerie-unless, of course, the painting it took its form from was of such a work. Added to this potent mix is enigmatic master painter Vincent Rushkin. A troll of a man who is alternately foul and fair, Rushkin takes Isabelle on as a student, teaching her how to unlock her true potential as an artist, as well as her hidden talent to bring forth numena. But Rushkin's attentions raise questions of their own. How does he know of Isabelle's talent? And are these numena real in their own right, or are they merely manifestations of her fertile artist's imagination? And what happens to one if its painting is destroyed?

Needless to say, de Lint answers all the questions he poses-at least as much as some fundamental questions can be answered. Fans of de Lint's short fiction will no doubt find this novel to their liking, and de Lint stocks the supporting cast with his usual on-the-fringes-of-society artistic types, including the popular Jilly Coppercorn and Geordie Riddell. But Memory & Dream goes places de Lint simply can't explore in the short form, and successfully continues the more mature direction his career took with The Little Country (Tor Books, 1991) and continued in Trader (Tor Books, 1997) and Someplace to Be Flying (Tor Books,1998). For any reader looking to join the ever-growing de Lint bandwagon, Memory & Dream is the perfect place to hop on.

Editions
Tor; hardcover, 1994 Tor; mass market, 1995
MacMillan, UK; hardcover, 1995 Pan, UK; mass market, 1996
ereader.com; e-book, 2000 Global Group Holdings, China; 2 volume trade paperback, 2002

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