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Other Books
Over My Head (2013)
The Cats of Tanglewood Forest (2013)
Under My Skin (2012)
The Painted Boy (2010)
The Very Best of Charles de Lint (2010)
Muse and Reverie (2009)
Eyes Like Leaves (2009)
The Mystery of Grace (2009)
Woods and Waters Wild (2009)
Yellow Dog (2008)
What the Mouse Found (2008)
Dingo (2008)
Little (Grrl) Lost (2007)
Old Man Crow (2007)
Promises to Keep (2007)
Widdershins (2006)
Triskell Tales 2 (2006)
Make A Joyful Noise (2006)
The Hour Before Dawn (2005)
Quicksilver & Shadow (2005)
The Blue Girl (2004)
Medicine Road (2004)
Refinerytown (2003)
Spirits in the Wires (2003)
A Handful of Coppers (2003)
A Circle of Cats (2003)
Tapping the Dream Tree (2002)
Waifs and Strays (2002)
Seven Wild Sisters (2002)
The Onion Girl (2001)
The Road to Lisdoonvarna (2001)
Triskell Tales (2000)
Forests of the Heart (2000)
The Buffalo Man (1999)
The Newford Stories (1999)
Moonlight and Vines (1999)
Someplace to be Flying (1998)
Trader (1997)
Jack of Kinrowan (1997)
The Ivory and the Horn (1995)
Memory & Dream (1994)
The Wild Wood (1994)
Into the Green (1993)
The Wishing Well (1993)
Dreams Underfoot (1993)
I'll Be Watching You (1992)
From a Whisper to a Scream (1992)
Merlin Dreams in the Mondream Wood (1992)
Spiritwalk (1992)
Paperjack (1991)
Our Lady of the Harbour (1991)
Hedgework and Guessery (1991)
Death Leaves an Echo (1991)
Ghosts of Wind and Shadow (1991)
Uncle Dobbin's Parrot Fair (1991)
The Little Country (1991)
The Dreaming Place (1990)
Angel of Darkness (1990)
Ghostwood (1990)
Drink Down the Moon (1990)
The Fair in Emain Macha (1990)
Philip José Farmer's The Dungeon: The Hidden City (1990)
Westlin Wind (1989)
Berlin (1989)
Philip José Farmer's The Dungeon: The Valley of Thunder (1989)
Svaha (1989)
Wolf Moon (1988)
Greenmantle (1988)
Jack the Giant-Killer (1987)
Ascian in Rose (1987)
Yarrow: An Autumn Tale (1986)
Mulengro: A Romany Tale (1985)
The Harp of the Grey Rose (1985)
Moonheart: A Romance (1984)
The Riddle of the Wren (1984)
De Grijze Roos (1983)
Yarrow: An Autumn Tale
Yarrow: An Autumn Tale
Orb

Cat lived in a land of dreams, crossing over the borders of sleep into a magic realm where gnomes lived among standing stones and selchies beneath the waves, where antlered Mynfel walked by moonlight; and the harper Kothlen told stories of the ancient days.. When she woke from her travels she told her own stories about the Otherworld. Her publisher called her novels 'fantasy', but Mynfel's domain seemed more real than the streets of Ottawa. until a thief came out of the night and stole away all her dreams.
Source: Book Cover

Reviews
From Fantasy Review, 1986:
Charles de Lint is an excellent writer, and Yarrow his fourth novel is terrific. Yarrow is a tale of friendship and trust, hope and honor, faith and love, with a dark eroticism for spice. It settles for no cliched scenes and no easy answers, and conveys a reality of place (modern Ottawa) not commonly found in any fiction. Novels as good as Yarrow don't come along that often. As one of de Lint's characters puts it, "while the tale itself…is of utmost importance…the trueness of the telling is what makes up a storyteller's craft." De Lint's telling is indeed true and Yarrow is highly recommended.

Rambles:
The cool greens of the forest on the cover pulls you in. The creature in the leaves hints at a hidden side of reality that can have a darker shade as Charles de Lint's heroine, Cat Midhir, discovers in Yarrow. The Orb trade paperback is a reissue of de Lint's 1986 novel that followed Cat's struggle to save the Otherworld, her friends, and her own life.

Cat is an author whose plots and characters come from her vivid dreams. Cat has visited this dreamscape, the Otherworld, since she was young. There she met Kothlen, a bard who gave her a secret name, Yarrow. Recently, however, Cat has stopped dreaming and finds she can no longer write. As she struggles to break her writer's block, strange things begin to happen. The shadowy Lysistratus stalks Cat, hoping to steal the soul of a true dreamer. And Cat discovers that the Otherworld is not a product of her dreams, but a real place to which she is deeply connected.

Along with her friends from the "real" world and a gnome named Tiddy Mun from the Otherworld, Cat has to face Lysistratus in order to save them all. In true fantasy style, the fight requires Cat to face the truths within.

Charles de Lint does some of his best character work in Yarrow. All the characters are strongly drawn, even the minor ones who only appear to be killed by Lysistratus. Through his use of imagery, de Lint takes the reader effortlessly into the Otherworld, which is so richly depicted that the reader believes its reality before Cat accepts it.

Although the plot may seem to mirror a number of other fantasy novels (girl enters dream world, discovers it's real and faces evil to save everyone), the strong characters and settings become very real to the reader and the end isn't certain until the last page has been turned. You care about de Lint's characters and fight with them every step of the way.

Mythlore, 1986:
It is always gratifying to watch a writer grow into the style that best serves his/her creative gift. This has certainly been happening with Charles de Lint. …his imagination has expressed itself with a new vitality. Yarrow: An Autumn Tale is by far his most successful work to date, and lines together the many strengths his writing has acquired. The plotting is perfect, holding reader's attention unflaggingly until the last page. …more than confirms de Lint's skill as a fantasist.

BooksILoved.com:
In Yarrow, Charles de Lint takes a light-hearted, yet candid look at the need for balance between reality and fantasy in our existence. Through Caitlin's journey of self-discovery, de Lint reveals that remaining distant from reality all of the time could mean missing out on a whole lot of wonderful things. Inspiration can come from many sources. But at the same time, he also reminds us of how beautiful it is to dream.

Urban fantasy is one of my favorite genres because it assumes that modern-day-reality and fantasy can in fact co-exist. De Lint's refreshing writing style reflects this genre, mixing everyday language with Otherworldly terms that can reach out and touch readers from any background or lifestyle. His characters could be any one of us. We can relate with them because in their lives they struggle with the same things we do. What I love the most is that de Lint treats the fanciful with reverent belief and melds it right into his characters' everyday lives. He leads the reader to stop thinking of such things as fairy tales and start believing them as the possible.

Yarrow is profound truth clothed in a delightful tale.

From Mythlore, 1986:
It is always gratifying to watch a writer grow into the style that best serves his/her creative gift. This has certainly been happening with Charles de Lint. …his imagination has expressed itself with a new vitality. Yarrow: An Autumn Tale is by far his most successful work to date, and lines together the many strengths his writing has acquired. The plotting is perfect, holding reader's attention unflaggingly until the last page. …more than confirms de Lint's skill as a fantasist.

Editions
Ace; mass market, l986 Pan, UK; trade paperback, 1992
Pan, UK; mass market, 1993 Orb; trade paperback, 1997
ereader.com; e-book, 2001

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