Violence against women in Alan Moore's comics

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Violence against women in Alan Moore's comics

Postby Brightonian » Sun Sep 18, 2011 6:59 am

I've recently been noticing how many of Alan Moore's comics feature graphic depictions of brutal assaults on women. For instance:

- Watchmen: Comedian's attempted rape of Sally Jupiter
- V for Vendetta: Attempted rape of Evey by Fingermen; sustained torture of Evey by V
- League vol 1: Hyde attacks Mina
- League vol 2: Griffin attacks Mina
- Black Dossier: "Jimmy" attacks Mina
- League vol 3, 1910: brutal gang-rape of Janni
- Neonomicon: sustained rape of female Fed by reptilian demon creature.

And I haven't even looked at From Hell.

These attacks are often, but not always, followed by swift and ruthless retribution, usually by powerful male protectors. Still, I can't help finding it a little disturbing that Moore keeps returning to this theme.
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Re: Violence against women in Alan Moore's comics

Postby admin » Sun Sep 18, 2011 8:30 am

Alan Moore's comics feature violence, including violence against women, men, children, and animals. His comics also feature many strong women. It is not my impression that he dwells on violence against women in the way that tends to encourage such violence. Rather the reverse.
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Re: Violence against women in Alan Moore's comics

Postby Brightonian » Mon Sep 19, 2011 4:44 am

I certainly wouldn't say that Alan Moore promotes violence against women, whether intentionally or not, nor do I think he's in any way misogynistic. Still, after talking to other comics fans and snooping around the web, I find I'm far from alone in my unease at how time and again he uses rape or attempted rape as a plot device. At the same time, I accept that comic books should not shy away from exploring the darker sides of human nature. And BTW, the image of the "strong woman" in SF&F can be as much of a male fantasy as the captive princess or damsel in distress.
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