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The Alienated Critic
by D. Douglas Fratz
By way of introduction, D. Douglas Fratz has been reading science fiction for almost fifty years, and writing about it for more than forty. Since discovering the Tom Swift novels and the Heinlein juveniles in the early 60s, it has been a primary and continuous source of reading pleasure. He has been reviewing books and writing commentary on science fiction and fantasy fiction since 1969, and spend slightly more than two decades (1973-1993) editing and publishing the SF review magazine, Thrust Science Fiction & Fantasy Review (in its later years Quantum Science Fiction & Fantasy Review), which garnered five Hugo Award nominations.  

The Alienated Critic The Alienated Critic
a column by D. Douglas Fratz
We have been fortunate to have seen in the past twelve months career-spanning new best-of collections of short fiction from four of the science fiction field's best authors. Mike Resnick (Win Some, Lose Some: The Hugo Award Winning (and Nominated) Short Science Fiction and Fantasy of Mike Resnick), Connie Willis (The Best of Connie Willis: Award-Winning Stories), Joe Haldeman (The Best of Joe Haldeman) and Robert Silverberg (The Best of Robert Silverberg: Stories of Six Decades) have produced more top quality short science fiction over the past five decades than many other auctorial quartets. Douglas also goes out on a limb by providing his thoughts on who should win the major fiction category Hugo Awards, and who probably will win.

The Alienated Critic The Alienated Critic
a column by D. Douglas Fratz
The novella (or short novel) may be the best of all lengths for science fiction -- long enough to fully explore the complex ideas, narratives, settings and characters needed for excellence in SF, but short enough to avoid the need for extraneous material that too often slows the pacing, diverts reader attention, and dilutes the emotional and intellectual impact of the story. D. Douglas Fratz believes that a persuasive case for this can be made with examples throughout the history of modern science fiction. He also gives us a glimpse into how he became a fan of ebooks and their role in his reading.

The Alienated Critic The Alienated Critic
a column by D. Douglas Fratz
By way of introduction, D. Douglas Fratz has been reading science fiction for almost fifty years, and writing about it for more than forty. Since discovering the Tom Swift novels and the Heinlein juveniles in the early 60s, it has been a primary and continuous source of reading pleasure. He has been reviewing books and writing commentary on science fiction and fantasy fiction since 1969, and spend slightly more than two decades (1973-1993) editing and publishing the SF review magazine, Thrust Science Fiction & Fantasy Review (in its later years Quantum Science Fiction & Fantasy Review), which garnered five Hugo Award nominations.

Copyright © 2013 D. Douglas Fratz


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