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Every Last Drop Every Last Drop by Charlie Huston
reviewed by Tammy Moore
Joe Pitt is one of those men who could start a fight in an empty room. Not that he needs to, there's a whole city full of vampires who have an axe to grind with him. After the events of the last book, Joe has been exiled the South Bronx. He's doing his best to keep a low profile and eke out enough of a living to keep him in blood, bullets and smokes. It's not easy. He's there on sufferance -- despite the tolerance and interest of local boss Esperanza -- and he's down to his last three bullets.

Summer Morning, Summer Night Summer Morning, Summer Night by Ray Bradbury
reviewed by Mario Guslandi
Lazy summer days and nights are the common ground for a collection featuring some Ray Bradbury stories from the 50s and a bunch of new short stories (the latter -- alas -- mostly little more than sketchy vignettes). Summer is the season and Green Town, Illinois, apparently the constant location for stories which may not be equal to Bradbury's masterpieces but which manage to subtly move and think about the secret meaning of human life with its glory and its miseries.

The Burning Man The Burning Man by Mark Chadbourn
reviewed by Nathan Brazil
When he's on form, there is no one writing today that can do urban gritty magic as well as Mark Chadbourn, and this book is very much on form, in terms of its action, exciting storytelling and sheer force. This is the penultimate book of a nine book series, and something one could describe as a lightning rod for the author's barbed dark fantasy. In addition to his favoured base of Celtic mythology, we also get samplings of Norse, Chinese and Egyptian deities, some portrayed in refreshingly different ways to the norm.

Razor Girl Life As We Knew It Razor Girl by Marianne Mancusi and Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer
reviewed by Georges T. Dodds
Both novels are about teenage girls growing up to become young women under the impetus of having to survive after a planet-wide disaster. However, each takes a radically different approach to their subject. Both are entertaining reads, seemingly achieve the effect they intend, and neither suffers from major faults in their respective genres, though neither are entirely original or groundbreaking either.

The Lost Fleet: Valiant The Lost Fleet: Valiant by Jack Campbell
reviewed by Michael M Jones
Captain John "Black Jack" Geary never asked to be a hero. He never dreamed of becoming a legend. In fact, by all rights, he should be long dead by now, one of the earliest casualties of the war between the Alliance and the Syndics. Instead, thanks to a fluke of fate, he spent a century in suspended animation, only to be rescued and brought back into service, just in time to assume command of the massive Alliance fleet, lost deep within Syndic territory.

Nexus Graphica Nexus Graphica
a column by Rick Klaw and Mark London Williams
A friend of Rick Klaw revealed his Obama presidency fears to Rick. While he stands firmly with the candidate, desiring a change from the Republican rush to ruin of the previous eight years, he fears that the neo-Nazi racists of the extreme far right, fermented by the assertions of neo-cons and their new poster child, Sarah Palin, will come to believe that Barak Obama and his "terrorist" friends will destroy the so-called "real" America of the pro-life, gun-toting, evangelical Christians. These worries over unlikely scenarios lies beyond his control, yet it paralyzes and consumes him. Rick Klaw understand the instinct to freeze when confronted with the overwhelming. He encounters a similar situation every day,

New Arrivals New Arrivals
compiled by Neil Walsh
New here at the SF Site are the latest from Piers Anthony, Tim Waggoner, Sergei Lukyanenko, Laurell K. Hamilton, Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, David Farland, Cory Doctorow, and much more.

The Hounds of Ash and Other Tales of Fool Wolf The Hounds of Ash and Other Tales of Fool Wolf by Greg Keyes
reviewed by Steven H Silver
The author returns to his world of The Waterborn with a collection of short stories which focus on the barbarian character Fool Wolf, who is possessed, or at least shares a body, with a rather blood-thirsty goddess, Chugaachik. The collection is written in a style reminiscent of the Weird Tales stories of Clark Ashton Smith or Robert E. Howard with a healthy dose of Fritz Leiber and Michael Moorcock thrown in.

Jhegaala Jhegaala by Steven Brust
reviewed by John Enzinas
Jhegaala, the eleventh book about Vlad Taltos, is a flashback that takes place between Dzur and Issola. It chronicles Vlad's journeys in the East as he attempts to both distance himself from the Jhereg who have a price on his head and to try and discover more about his family tree.

Paul of Dune Paul of Dune by Brian Herbert & Kevin J. Anderson
Narrated by Scott Brick

an audio review podcast by Gil T. Wilson
In the world of science-fiction, one of the best series of books to come down the pike is the Dune series created by Frank Herbert. After Frank Herbert's death, his son, Brian Herbert, teamed up with sci-fi author Kevin J. Anderson and pretty much wrapped up the series by providing 6 prequel and 2 sequel books. So with all of that taken care of, one has to ask, what more is there in the Dune Universe?
Click on the link to get the MP3 podcast file. Or click on this link to read the audiobook review of Paul of Dune.

Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks by David Whitaker
Multicast performance starring Frazer Hines

an audio review podcast by Gil T. Wilson
The episode begins with the Doctor and Jamie trying to track down thieves who stole the TARDIS. After some mysterious clues the Doctor and Jamie track down an antiques dealer whose antiques are authentic but new. This leads the Doctor and Jamie to be captured by the dealer and the Daleks and taken back in time to 1866.
Click on the link to get the MP3 podcast file. Or click on this link to read the audiobook review of Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks.

Reaper's Gale Reaper's Gale Reaper's Gale by Steven Erikson
reviewed by Greg L. Johnson
This seventh volume in the Malazan Book of the Fallen returns to the Empire of Lether and the characters first introduced in Midnight Tides. In that volume, the Tiste Edur led a successful rebellion against the Letherii and actually took over the Empire. Now, although the Tiste Edur Emperor Rhulad still sits on the throne, the institutions of Lether have remained intact. And while the Tiste Edur hold a privileged place in society, the Letheri secret police are terrorizing the populace, there are revolts along the border, and the Chancellor plots to overthrow the Emperor. With all this going on, it's no big surprise that members of the Emperor's court are not paying much attention when another momentous event takes place.

City at the End of Time City at the End of Time by Greg Bear
reviewed by Paul Kincaid
The novel opens with three new arrivals in present-day Seattle. All are young, disconnected, marginalized. They are also running away from something, indeed they have spent their entire lives running away, though what it is that is after them neither they nor we have any clear idea. All three carry with them a stone. One of them, Ginny, is directed to a strange warehouse, where she finds accommodation and a sort of job helping a strange old man, Bidewell, sort through an immense collection of old books in search of anomalies. The second, Jack, earns a precarious living as a busker juggling live rats, shares an apartment with someone we never meet and who seems to keep forgetting Jack's existence.

Marsbound Marsbound by Joe Haldeman
reviewed by Michael M Jones
At first, Carmen Dula is thrilled to have the opportunity to travel to Mars with her family, where they'll be part of opening up mankind's next great frontier. Once reality sets in -- that space travel is long, dull, cramped and uncomfortable -- she's not quite as excited, even with the new friends she's making along the way, and not even the attentions of the handsome pilot of the John Carter of Mars -- their home for the next six months -- can entirely cure the feeling that she's giving up everything she knew for an experience bordering between boring and deadly.

News Spotlight -- Genre Books and Media News Spotlight -- Genre Books and Media
a column by Sandy Auden
Tom DeFalco gives us the inside line about the Marvel Chronicle; Alison Goodman talks about oriental fantasy The Two Pearls of Wisdom; Suzanne McLeod talks urban fantasy with The Sweet Scent of Blood; Graham Joyce on demons and the Memoirs of a Master Forger; and Jay Amory tells us about flying in his YA omnibus The Clouded World.

Babylon 5.1: Televison Reviews Babylon 5.1
TV reviews by Rick Norwood
Rick has been enjoying Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles and Heroes. He has not been enjoying Fringe or Smallville. A peek at Life on Mars has raised some comparisons to the original UK version. He also gives us a list of what SF is on TV in November.

Moonheart Moonheart by Charles de Lint
an audiobook review by Nicki Gerlach
Sara Kendall discovers some strange items in the storeroom of an Ottawa antique store she runs with her uncle, Jamie Tamsin. The objects are interesting in themselves -- a detailed painting depicting the meeting between a Native American shaman and a European bard, a bone disk with strange engravings on it, and a gold ring encased in clay -- but even more extraordinary is the way that these artifacts seem to tug on Sara's consciousness, pulling her into the forest primeval, into a world of magic, mystery and danger.

Paul of Dune Paul of Dune by Brian Herbert & Kevin J. Anderson
an audiobook review by Gil T. Wilson
Paul of Dune takes place essentially between the time of the original novel Dune and the second book Dune Messiah. Paul Maud'Dib is in control of the planet Arrakis, Dune, and is the emperor of the known universe. The former Padisha Emperor Shaddam Corrino, IV, has been exiled to the planet Salusas Secundus, the training planet for his Sardaukar army which were defeated by Maud'Dib and have since joined the jihad of Maud'Dib.

Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks by David Whitaker
an audiobook review by Gil T. Wilson
The episode begins with the Doctor and Jamie trying to track down thieves who stole the TARDIS. After some mysterious clues the Doctor and Jamie track down an antiques dealer whose antiques are authentic but new. This leads the Doctor and Jamie to be captured by the dealer and the Daleks and taken back in time to 1866.

Second Looks

Ilario: the Lion's Eye Ilario: the Lion's Eye by Mary Gentle
reviewed by David Soyka
The story is narrated by the newly freed, but shortly re-enslaved, Ilario. Ilario had been raised by foster parents who gave him into slavery to serve as King Rodrigo's court freak; eventually his real mother who gave him up, now wife to the king's chief counselor, Videric, acknowledges him. She also tries to kill him. Several times.

Non-Fiction

Dalek I Loved You: A Memoir Dalek I Loved You: A Memoir by Nick Griffiths
reviewed by David Maddox
If you were too young, were too old or not in any way, shape or form British, what was it like living through that crazy era of the 70s and the effect Doctor Who was having on the population? Writer Nick Griffiths doesn't try to answer that.


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