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SF Masterworks is a series of classics that deserve to be in print and kept there, rather than languishing as OP titles. They were published monthly by Millennium, which is an imprint of the Orion Publishing Group, a UK publisher whose other imprints include Dolphin, Orion Media, Phoenix and Victor Gollancz. Below you'll find an overview of the series so far, with cover/title links to the SF Site reviews (where applicable) along with synopses of those titles yet to be reviewed (cover images are linked to larger images). They are in reverse order of release, with the newest ones on the left. It is a companion series for their Fantasy Masterworks line.

SF Masterworks | Page 1 | Page 2 | Page 3 | Page 4 |            Fantasy Masterworks | Page 1 | Page 2 | Page 3 |

Orion SF Masterworks
   No. 10
The Rediscovery of Man The Rediscovery of Man by Cordwainer Smith
The future is an interstellar empire ruled by the Lords of the Instrumentality, whose access to the drug stroon from the planet Norstrilia confers on them virtual immortality; a future in which wealthy humanity is served by the underpeople, genetically engineered animals made to look human.

   No. 9
Gateway Gateway by Frederik Pohl
reviewed by Trent Walters
It has long been considered a classic of the genre. In 1978, it won the Campbell, the Hugo, the Locus and the Nebula awards. Did it deserve such laurels? In a word, yes. The mysterious tunneled worlds and technology of the Heechee still feels fresh and full of wonder. The novel weaves the past and present of Robinette Broadhead, from his contemporary psychiatric sessions with a computer he has dubbed Sigfrid von Shrink to his reminisces of less fortunate days.

   No. 8
The Fifth Head of Cerberus The Fifth Head of Cerberus by Gene Wolfe
On the twin colony planets of Saintes Anne and Croix, civilization is a mix of the archaic and the futuristic, with slavery and advanced science co-existing. Were the shapeshifting alien inhabitants of Sainte Anne exterminated by the colonists, or did they kill the humans and adopt their identity?

   No. 7
Lord of Light Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny
reviewed by Rich Horton
On a colony planet, men have established a society based on technological means of imitating the Hindu religion. It is possible to reincarnate the "mind" or "soul" to a new body, even an animal. But some of the earliest colonists have additional powers, which give them the status of gods. And a faction among them is using that means in political ways: punishing their enemies with reincarnation as animals, or with the "true death."

   No. 6
Babel-17 Babel-17 by Samuel R. Delany
In the far future, after human civilization has spread through the galaxy, communications begin to arrive in an apparently alien language. They appear to threaten invasion, but, in order to counter the threat, the messages must first be understood.

   No. 5
The Stars My Destination The Stars My Destination by Alfred Bester
reviewed by Lisa DuMond
You probably seen this novel included in every SF Top 10 List published. 45 years have passed since it was first published and it's yet to be knocked out of the masters' circle. That's a pretty impressive statement. Bester's classic has the stuff to back it up. Gully Foyle is not exactly one of the good guys, but he's your hero for this trip. Foyle's life has never been easy, but as the novel opens he is in about the worst predicament of his life -- stranded in space, alone, with little or no chance of rescue.

   No. 4
3 Novels Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick
reviewed by Neil Walsh
Written in 1966, first published in 1968, and the basis for Ridley Scott's 1982 cult classic film Blade Runner, this novel is a disturbing exploration of what really constitutes life, reality and faith. Primarily, it is about a bounty hunter whose job is to track down and "retire" renegade androids which almost perfectly resemble actual human beings.

   No. 3
Cities in Flight Cities in Flight by James Blish
This novel explores a future built on two crucial discoveries: antigravity devices, which allow whole cities to be lifted from the Earth in order to become giant spaceships; and longevity drugs, which enable people to live for thousands of years.

   No. 2
I Am Legend I Am Legend by Richard Matheson
reviewed by Lisa DuMond
This sink-your-teeth-in vampire masterpiece will change the way you look at yourself and the amalgam of the world around you right now. Robert Neville has a rough life, working day and night. While the sun shines he slaves away, killing off the competition... one vampire at a time. His methods are simple and direct. Kill as many as humanly possible. Kill them -- kill them again, that is, and make sure they don't come back this time.

   No. 1
The Forever War The Forever War by Joe Haldeman
reviewed by Lisa DuMond
Private William Mandella is a man about to embark on a journey that will traverse space and time, war and uneasy peace. By the close of the book, the reluctant soldier will have travelled over twelve centuries. That can be traumatic enough, but it is the changes in society, mores, and norms that will be the most difficult barriers facing him. No work before or since this novel has so successfully portrayed the emotional toll of what is, essentially, time-travel.

Hard Covers
   No. 10
The Day of the Triffids The Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham
"When Bill Masen wakes up in his hospital bed, he has reason to be grateful for the bandages that covered his eyes the night before. For he finds a population rendered helpless by the blindness that followed the spectacular display of bright green lights that filled the night sky; a population at the mercy of the Triffids. Once, with their ability to move and their carnivorous habits, the Triffids were just botanical curiosities. But now, with humans so vulnerable, they are a potent threat to humanity's survival. It is up to people like Bill, the few who can still see, to carve out a future... "

   No. 9
The Forever War The Forever War by Joe Haldeman
reviewed by Lisa DuMond
Private William Mandella is a man about to embark on a journey that will traverse space and time, war and uneasy peace. By the close of the book, the reluctant soldier will have travelled over twelve centuries. That can be traumatic enough, but it is the changes in society, mores, and norms that will be the most difficult barriers facing him. No work before or since this novel has so successfully portrayed the emotional toll of what is, essentially, time-travel.

   No. 8
Ringworld Ringworld by Larry Niven
reviewed by Trent Walters
Louis Wu on his 200th birthday is bored, having done all he wants to do in Known Space. A Puppeteer, a two-headed tripod with clawed hooves, ensnares Wu's curiosity on a job that will take him out of the known world. The Puppeteer recruits a Kzin, a five-hundred pound feline alien named Speaker-to-Animals, by insulting it. Teela Brown, another human but bred genetically lucky, also signs on after learning that her love, Wu, is going and that humanity's hope for survival hinges on a new starship that the Puppeteers will give Wu and Brown upon completing their mission to a place the Puppeteer is cryptic about.

   No. 7
The Moon is a Harsh Mistress The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A. Heinlein
"Luna is an open penal colony and the regime is a harsh one. Not surprisingly, revolution against the hated authority is planned. But the key figures in the revolt are an unlikely crew: Manuel Garcia O'Kelly, an engaging jack of all trades, the beautiful Wyoming Knott - and Mike, a lonely computer who likes to make up jokes... "

   No. 6
Childhood's End Childhood's End by Arthur C. Clarke
reviewed by David Maddox
Imagine humanity on the verge of universal travel, space crafts primed to break the final barrier and open up a cosmos full of mystery and wonder. Then imagine that in one moment it's all taken away. A technologically superior race descends from the heavens to become our keepers. Life as we know it ends. The book's opening scene is probably the most recognizable of SF introductions. The vision of gigantic Overlord space ships appearing over every major Earth city is so phenomenally powerful that it has been recreated and honoured in countless science fiction films.

   No. 5
A Canticle for Leibowitz A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller, Jr.
reviewed by Stephen M. Davis
Here is a novel that demands to be read. The author speaks through his characters on a number of universal issues -- euthanasia, abortion, the differences between men and animals, and the conflict between the Book of Nature and the Book of God. The long-awaited sequel, Saint Leibowitz and the Wild Horse Woman, has just been published in hardcover.

   No. 4
The Stars My Destination The Stars My Destination by Alfred Bester
reviewed by Lisa DuMond
You probably seen this novel included in every SF Top 10 List published. 45 years have passed since it was first published and it's yet to be knocked out of the masters' circle. That's a pretty impressive statement. Bester's classic has the stuff to back it up. Gully Foyle is not exactly one of the good guys, but he's your hero for this trip. Foyle's life has never been easy, but as the novel opens he is in about the worst predicament of his life -- stranded in space, alone, with little or no chance of rescue.

   No. 3
The Man in the High Castle The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick
"It is 1962 and the Second World War has been over for seventeen years: people have now had a chance to adjust to the new order. But it's not been easy. The Mediterranean has been drained to make farmland, the population of Africa has virtually been wiped out and America has been divided between the Nazis and the Japanese. In the neutral buffer zone that divides the two superpowers lives the man in the high castle, the author of an underground bestseller, a work of fiction that offers an alternative theory of world history in which the Axis powers didn't win the war. The novel is a rallying cry for all those who dream of overthrowing the occupiers. But could it be more than that? Subtle, complex and beautifully characterized, The Man in the High Castle remains the finest alternative world novel ever written, and a work of profundity and significance."

   No. 2
The Left Hand of Darkness The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin
"Genly Ai is an ethnologist observing the people of the planet Gethen, a world perpetually in winter. The people there are androgynous, normally neuter, but they can become male or female at the peak of their sexual cycle. Genly Ai is soon drawn into the complex politics of the planet. "

   No. 1
Dune Dune by Frank Herbert
reviewed by Alma A. Hromic
"I was fourteen years old when Frank Herbert shone a strange and penetrating light into my world, and it was in that light that I first came to know many things. About the many kinds of love -- the selfish versus the unselfish, the romantic versus the passionate versus the pragmatic versus the loyal, the love of people versus the love of power, and how none of these can exists by itself but instead twine and tangle until the heart of any average sentient human being aches from the weight of love laid upon it."

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