Obituary: Dave Trampier

Artist Dave Trampier (b.1954) died on March 24. Trampier came to prominence working for TSR Games in the 1980s, illustrating the original Dungeon Master Screen, working on Star Frontiers and Gamma World, and drawing the “Wormy” comic that appeared in Dragon magazine. He frequently signed his artwork with his initials, DAT. After leaving TSR in the late 1980s, Trampier turned his back on the gaming world, although he was recently in talks about the possibility of publishing a collection of “Wormy” comics.

Spectrum Award Finalists

The finalists for this year’s Spectrum Awards for art have been announced. The gold and silver medal winners in each category will be announced at Spectrum Fantastic Art Live, held in Kansas City, MO the weekend of May 9-11.

Advertising

  • “Little Monsters,” by Anita Kunz
  • “A Tiger Beer Chinese New Year,” by Victo Ngai
  • “Hiversaires”, Gabriel Verdon
  • “The Criterion Collection Lord of the Flies,” by Kent Williams
  • “Go Into the Gate,” by Shu Yan

Book

  • The End of the Road, by Nicolas Delort
  • Little Sambha and the Tiger with the Beautiful Purple Shoes with Crimson Soles, by Scott Gustafson
  • Fire: the Road Beside the Wall, by John Harris
  • The Golden Apple Tree 1, by Petar Meseldzija
  • Dreamboats, Lilies, Koi and Chang Kuo-lao, by Kirsti Wakelin

Comics

  • The Red Door, by Thomas Campi
  • All Corners of the Country: The Lost Buildings #4, by He Jie Mona
  • Clive Barker’s Next Testament #6, by Goni Montes
  • Seasons, page 1, by Mark A. Nelson
  • Aliens #1, cover by David Palumbo

Concept Art

  • “Ackzero Interior,” by Jamie Jones
  • “John Carter Punches a Thark,” by Vance Kovacs
  • “Messenger Girl,” by Brian Matyas
  • “Kite City 2,” by Theo Prins
  • “Refugees,” by Theo Prins

Dimensional

  • “Don’t Mind Me,” by Jessica Dalvo
  • “Hot Diggety Dog,” by Colin & Kristine Poole
  • “Goblin Spider,” by Forest Rogers
  • “Vertical Man-Tank, 1892,” by The Shiflett Bros.
  • “Grimm Tales: Thousandfurs,” by Shaun Tan

Editorial

  • “Rumor of Angels,” by Nicolas Delort
  • “Fragile Planet,” by Bill Mayer
  • “The Insects of Love,” by Tran Nguyen
  • “Hair Tree,” by Yuko Shimizu
  • “Recall,” by Luo Xin

Institutional

  • “The Hag Griselle Pays a Visit,” by Ed Binkley
  • “Shared Eyewear,” by Bill Carman
  • “Huor and Hurin Approach Gondolin,” by Donato Giancola
  • “Blacksea,” by Justin Sweet
  • “Ascent of Man,” by Rebecca Yanovskaya

Unpublished

  • “Lady of Light,” by Audrey Benjaminsen
  • “Riding Horse on the Freezing Day,” by Yukari Masuike
  • “Ode to the Moon,” by Jean-Baptiste Monge
  • “The Long Walk Home,” by Omar Rayyan
  • “Lilaia the Naiad,” by Annie Stegg

For more information…

Obituary: Bhob Stewart

Bhob Stewart (b.1937) died on February 24. Stewart published one of the earliest comic fanzines and in 1969 curated the first exhibition of comic book art at a major museum, the Corcoran in Washington, D.C. Corcoran also wrote comics for several different publishers, developed the Wacky Pack line of trading cards, and co-authored Scream Queens.

Mark Rogers

Author and illustrator Mark E. Rogers (b.1952) died of an apparent heart attack on February 2 while hiking. Rogers was best known for the Samurai Cat books, which began with The Adventures of Samurai Cat. Other novels included The Dead, Zorachus, and the Zancharthus trilogy. His novella “The Runestone” was adapted into a film of the same title starring Peter Riegert and Samurai Cat was made into the video game The Bridge of Catzad-Dum. Rogers appeared on trading card 31 issued by the Chicago in 2000 Worldcon bid. Rogers is survived by his wife Kate, his children, Sophia, Jeanette, Patrick and Nicholas, his granddaughter Indigo Dahlia, and his sister, Lois.

ETA: apparent cause of death and survivors.

Obituary: Hal Sutherland

Animator Hal Sutherland (b.1929) died on January 16. Sutherland got his start working on Disney’s Sleeping Beauty before he co-founded Filmation in the early 1960s and worked as the new company’s Director of Animation. His animation at Filmation included work on Star Trek: The Animated Series, The New Adventures of Flash Gordon, and several DC titles.

Loncon 3 Photography Competition

Loncon 3, this year’s Worldcon, has announced a photography contest, open to amateur and professional photographers. Photographers can enter their works in three different categories: Alien Earth, Future Cities Today, or a Junior category open to anyone under 16. The junior category has a £2 entry fee and the other categories have a £10 entry fee. Cash prizes will be awarded to the winners, with winners who are not members of Loncon 3 receiving a day pass to the convention as well. Submission deadline is April 30, 2014.

For more information…

Obituary: Janice Valleau Winkleman

Comics artist Janice Valleau Winkleman (b.1923) died on December 15. Winkleman was one of the first female artists to work in the comics field, working on Archie Comics as well as detective Toni Gayle. She began working in comics in the late 1930s and her last work appeared in Nyoka the Jungle Girl in 1955. Winkleman was also credited as Ginger Valleau, Janice Valleau, and Janice Winkleman.

Barker Wins Rotsler

Scottish fan Jim Barker has been named the winner of the 2014 Rotsler Award for best fan artist. Barker has previously been nominated for the Hugo Award and won the Checkpoint newszine poll for Best Fanartist. The Rotsler Award is sponsored by the Southern California Institute for Fan Interests. Established in 1998, the award carries an honorarium of US$300.

Gemmell Awards

The winners of the Gemmell Awardswere presented at a ceremony held the Metropole Hotel in Brighton in conjunction with the World Fantasy Con on October 31.

2013 Ravenheart Award for Best Fantasy Cover Art: Didier Graffet and Dave Senior for the cover of Red Country, by Joe Abercrombie (Gollancz)
2013 Morningstar Award for Best Fantasy Debut: Malice, by John Gwynne
2013 Legend Award for Best Fantasy Novel: The Blinding Knife, by Brent Weeks

For more information…

Obituary: Nick Cardy

Comic artist Nick Cardy (b. 1920) died on November 3. Cardy was best known for working on Aquaman and Teen Titans for DC. He began working for Eisner and Iger in 1938, when he was 18 and, after serving in World War II, he joined DC in 1950. In the mid-1970s, Cardy left the comics field for commercial art and film posters. Cardy was inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2005.