Obituary: Alan Rodgers

Author Alan Rodgers (b.1959) died on March 8. Rodgers began publishing with his story “The Boy who Came Back from the Dead.” His first novel, Blood of the Children, appeared in 1989. Rodgers served as Associate Editor for Rod Serling’s Twilight Zone magazine from 1984-1987 as well as editor of Night Cry from 1985-1987.

Obituary: William Pogue

Astronaut and author William Pogue (b.1930) died on March 4. Pogue joined NASA in 1966 and served on the support crews for three Apollo missions. He was scheduled to serve as Command Module Pilot for Apollo 19 before the mission was cancelled, instead serving as pilot for Skylab 4, the last Skylab mission. After he left the astronaut corps, Pogue wrote the book How Do You Go to the Bathroom in Space? and co-authored the science fiction novel The Trikon Deception with Ben Bova.

Obituary: Michael Shea

Author Michael Shea (b.1946) died on February 16. Shea’s novel Nifft the Lean won the World Fantasy Award in 1983 and his story “The Growlimb” won in 2004. He began publishing with the novel A Quest for Simbilis in 1974, which was an authorized sequel to Jack Vance’s The Dying Earth series and was short-listed for the British Fantasy Award. Shea wrote many other stories and novels, including the Nebula and Hugo nominated “The Autopsy.”

Alpha Receives Heinz Grant

Alpha, a Pittburgh-based writing workshop for young writers has received a $10,000 grant from Heinz Endowments. Alpha will recieve the money in installments over the next three years for use in funding scholarships for students for whom workshop tuition presents a financial hardship. This year, Alpha will be held at the University of Pittsburgh’s Greensburg Campus from July 25 – August 3.

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Obituary: Aaron Allston

Author Aaron Allston (b.1960) died on February 27. Allston collapsed earlier in the day while attending VisionCon. Allston began his career at Space Gamer magazine and served as editor before becoming a freelance game designer in 1983. He went on to write the Dungeons and Dragons Rules Cyclopedia and published his first novel, Web of Danger in 1988. Writing several more original novels, some in collaboration with Holly Lisle, Allston eventually turned to writing Star Wars tie-in novels, beginning with X-Wing: Wraith Squadron.

HWA Announces Lifetime Achievement Recipients

The Horror Writers Association has announced that R. L. Stine and Stephen Jones will be recognized with Lifetime Achievement Awards at this year’s Bram Stoker Awards Banquet, held on May 10th at the World Horror Convention in Portland, OR. Jones is the editor of numerous horror anthologies and Stine is the author of the Goosebumps and Fear Street series of kid’s books.

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Skylark Award

At Boskone 51, the weekend of February 14-16, this year’s recipients of the Skylark award was announced. The Skylark Award is presented for significant contributions through work in the field of science fiction and by exemplifying the personal qualities which made the late “Doc” Smith well-loved by those who knew him. This year’s award was won by Robert J. Sawyer.

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Robinson Named Special Guest

SFWA has announced that Frank Robinson will be a special guest at this year’s Nebula Awards Weekend, to be held from May 16-18 in San Jose. Robinson is the author of the novels The Glass Inferno and The Dark Between the Stars as well as the Hugo Award-winning Science Fiction of the Twentieth Century: An Illustrated History.

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Detcon1 Accounced YA Author GoH

Detcon1, this year’s North American Science Fiction Convention (NASFIC), has announced Nnedi Okorafor as their Young Adult Author Guest of Honor. Okorafor debut novel, the YA book Zahrah the Windseeker won the Wole Soyinka Prize for Literature in Africa. Detcon1 will be putting a special focus on YA literature at the convention. In addition to having Ms. Okorafor as a guest, Detcon1 will also present two awards for YA and Middle Grade Speculative Fiction in a joint ceremony with the 2014 Golden Duck Awards.

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Mark Rogers

Author and illustrator Mark E. Rogers (b.1952) died of an apparent heart attack on February 2 while hiking. Rogers was best known for the Samurai Cat books, which began with The Adventures of Samurai Cat. Other novels included The Dead, Zorachus, and the Zancharthus trilogy. His novella “The Runestone” was adapted into a film of the same title starring Peter Riegert and Samurai Cat was made into the video game The Bridge of Catzad-Dum. Rogers appeared on trading card 31 issued by the Chicago in 2000 Worldcon bid. Rogers is survived by his wife Kate, his children, Sophia, Jeanette, Patrick and Nicholas, his granddaughter Indigo Dahlia, and his sister, Lois.

ETA: apparent cause of death and survivors.