Obituary: Michael Sinclair

Louisville fan Michael Sinclair (b.1938) died on March 14. He began attending conventions with Rivercon in 1975. He later became involved in throwing bid parties for the New Orleans Worldcon bid. After New Orleans won, Sinclair and his wife continued to throw parties for a hoax Moscow bid until 1990.

Obituary: Lucius Shepard

Author Lucius Shepard (b.1947) died on March 18. Shepard began publishing in 1983 and his first novel, Green Eyes, appeared the following year. He won the Campbell Award for new author in 1985, a Nebula Award for his story “R&R,” a Hugo for “Barnacle Bill the Spacer,” and the World Fantasy Award twice, both times for collections.

Obituary: Richard Coogan

Actor Richard Coogan (b.1914) died on March 12, less than a month before his 100th birthday. In 1949, Coogan was cast in the lead role for Captain Video and His Video Rangers, which shot live in New York while Coogan was appearing on Broadway in Diamond Lil during the evenings. Coogan left the show in 1950, citing low budgets and poor scripts, and was replaced by Al Hodge. Coogan also appeared on the Westerns The Californians and Laramie.

Obituary: Alan Rodgers

Author Alan Rodgers (b.1959) died on March 8. Rodgers began publishing with his story “The Boy who Came Back from the Dead.” His first novel, Blood of the Children, appeared in 1989. Rodgers served as Associate Editor for Rod Serling’s Twilight Zone magazine from 1984-1987 as well as editor of Night Cry from 1985-1987.

Obituary: Fred Brammer

Virginia fan Fred Brammer (b.1940) died on August 18, 2013. Brammer was a member of First Fandom and worked to get the pilot episode of Star Trek into the Smithsonian Institute. Brammer worked as a government geologist and was a frequent Worldcon attendee.

Obituary: William Pogue

Astronaut and author William Pogue (b.1930) died on March 4. Pogue joined NASA in 1966 and served on the support crews for three Apollo missions. He was scheduled to serve as Command Module Pilot for Apollo 19 before the mission was cancelled, instead serving as pilot for Skylab 4, the last Skylab mission. After he left the astronaut corps, Pogue wrote the book How Do You Go to the Bathroom in Space? and co-authored the science fiction novel The Trikon Deception with Ben Bova.

Obituary: Michael Shea

Author Michael Shea (b.1946) died on February 16. Shea’s novel Nifft the Lean won the World Fantasy Award in 1983 and his story “The Growlimb” won in 2004. He began publishing with the novel A Quest for Simbilis in 1974, which was an authorized sequel to Jack Vance’s The Dying Earth series and was short-listed for the British Fantasy Award. Shea wrote many other stories and novels, including the Nebula and Hugo nominated “The Autopsy.”

Obituary: Aaron Allston

Author Aaron Allston (b.1960) died on February 27. Allston collapsed earlier in the day while attending VisionCon. Allston began his career at Space Gamer magazine and served as editor before becoming a freelance game designer in 1983. He went on to write the Dungeons and Dragons Rules Cyclopedia and published his first novel, Web of Danger in 1988. Writing several more original novels, some in collaboration with Holly Lisle, Allston eventually turned to writing Star Wars tie-in novels, beginning with X-Wing: Wraith Squadron.

Obituary: Bhob Stewart

Bhob Stewart (b.1937) died on February 24. Stewart published one of the earliest comic fanzines and in 1969 curated the first exhibition of comic book art at a major museum, the Corcoran in Washington, D.C. Corcoran also wrote comics for several different publishers, developed the Wacky Pack line of trading cards, and co-authored Scream Queens.

Obituary: Gary Dockter

Philadelphia fan Gary Dockter (b.1963) died on February 8. Dockter collected comic books. Dockter was also a fan of steampunk.