Buzz-inga!

A new species of orchard bee discovered by Brazilian biologist Andre Nemesio has been named Euglossa bazinga, in honor of the catch phrase used by television character Sheldon Cooper on the show The Big Bang Theory. Cooper, portrayed by Jim Parsons, uses the phrase to indicate he has perpetrated a practical joke. According to Nemesio, the name is fitting since the bee had tricked scientists with its similarity to other species.

For more information…

Obituary: Jesco von Puttkamer

NASA manager Jesco von Puttkamer (b.1933) died on December 27 at his home. Von Puttkamer immigrated to the US in 1962 and joined Wernher von Braun’s team in Huntsville, Alabama, where he worked on Apollo. He also worked on the Skylab program and helped rescue the space station when it would have been sold for scrap after it deorbited. While working at NASA, he also served as a Technical Advisor to Paramount Pictures for Star Trek: The Motion Picture. For more than a decade, von Puttkamer was responsible for the daily ISS Onorbit Status reports. In addition to published more than a dozen non-fiction books, he also published the Star Trek novelette “The Sleeping God.”

Obituary: Sir Patrick Moore

Astronomer Patrick Moore (b.1923) died at his home on December 9. Moore collaborated with artist David A. Hardy on the Hugo Award-nominated Futures: 50 Years in Space: The Challenge of the Stars. He served as the President of the British Astronomical Association and was the co-founder of the Society for Popular Astronomy. Moore was invited to run an observatory in East Grinstead when he was only 14.

Earth Size Neighbor Found

Scientists have discovered a planet only slightly larger than Earth in orbit around Alpha Centauri, only 4.37 light years from Earth (only Proxima Centauri is closer). The planet, which was discovered based on fluctuations in the star’s movement, orbits closer to its primary than Mercury does and completes an orbit every three days. The discovery was made using data from La Silla Observatory in Chile and will be officially announced in Nature on October 17.

For more information…

Skydiving Record Set

Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner set a new world’s record for highest skydive, leaping from a balloon at an altitude of 128,000. He broke the record set by Joseph Kittinger on August 16, 1960. Kittinger, who worked as an advisor to Baumgartner, had jumped from 102,800 feet. During the jump, Baumgartner also because the first human to break the sound barrier without the use of a jet, achieving that feat on the 65th anniversary of Chuck Yeager becoming the first human to break the sound barrier. Baumgartner’s leap was sponsored by Red Bull Energy Drink.

For more information…

Fountains of Mars

NASA has announced that Curiosity has found signs that water once flowed freely on the red planet. The evidence shows that Curiosity landed near an area that once held rapidly flowing water as evidenced by water-eroded gravel.

For more information…

Bradbury on Mars

On August 22, what would have been Ray Bradbury’s 92 birthday, NASA announced that it had named the landing site for the Curiosity rover in the author’s honor: Bradbury Landing. Curiosity landed on Mars on August 6 and took its first drive today.

For more information…

Obituary: Sally Ride

Astronaut Sally Ride (b.1951) died on July 23. In 1983, Ride became the first American woman (and youngest at that time) astronaut to fly into space when she flew on Challenger flight STS-7. Prior to that she worked on the development of the shuttle’s robotic arm. She flew on Challenger again in 1984 and was in training for a third flight when Challenger explored. Ride left NASA in 1987 and taught physics. In 2003, she served on the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

Chicon 7 Adds Special Guest

Chicon 7, the 70th World Science Fiction Convention, has announced the addition of Sy Liebergot as a special guest. Liebergot served as EECOM for NASA from Apollo 8 to Apollo 15 and was on duty when an explosion rocked Apollo 13. He continued to work at NASA and served as controller for the Skylab and Apollo-Soyuz Test Mission.

For more information…

Obituary: Norman Edmund

Norman Edmund (b.1916) died on January 16. Following World War II, Edmund began a catalog company as a reseller of military lenses rendered obsolete by the invention of radar. The company grew into Edmund Scientific, which sold telescopes, microscopes, chemistry kits, robot parts, gyroscopes, and the famous drinking bird among other scientific equipment and supplies.