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The reviews are sorted alphabetically by authors' last name -- one or more pages for each letter (plus one for Mc). All but some recent reviews are listed here. Links to those reviews appear on the Recent Feature Review Page.

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The Lord Of Terror The Lord Of Terror by Marcel Allain
reviewed by Georges T. Dodds
Thought to have sunk with Fantômas on the S.S. Gigantic, Juve and Fandor suddenly find themselves alive and well in c. 1925 Marseilles. When diplomat Léon de Vautreuil serves as courier for millions in diamonds, strange things begin to happen around Paris, his sister, known to be on a ship to South America, mysteriously returns home unable to speak, and the family's clearly dead dog has come back to life.

Lunar Encounter Lunar Encounter by Harold W.G. Allen
reviewed by Georges T. Dodds
Let's make this clear right from the start, this book is full of bad science, bad writing and bad science fiction. Lunar Encounter is an attempt by the author to disseminate his peculiar theories of cosmology in the form of a science fiction novel. With respect to the writing and science fiction elements, Georges can honestly say that it is likely the worse science fiction novel he has ever read.

Clockwork Phoenix 2 Clockwork Phoenix 2 edited by Mike Allen
reviewed by Mario Guslandi
Inside the cover of Clockwork Phoenix 2 there's a list of blurbs about the first volume of the anthology series. Among them is a phrase taken from Mario's review. (Although the publisher didn't deem it necessary to mention his name.) It says that the book contains "top-notch fiction irrespective of genre labels." Can one make the same statement concerning the second volume? Yes and no.

Clockwork Phoenix 2 Clockwork Phoenix 2 edited by Mike Allen
reviewed by Amal El-Mohtar
The anthology is not themed, except in being a sequel to the much-lauded Clockwork Phoenix; the stories themselves defy straight-lacing as obvious as "fantasy," "science fiction," or "horror," though many would certainly be comfortably filed under any of those headings. The chief accomplishment of this anthology is its showcasing of sixteen unique voices that manage nevertheless to harmonize into a sort of choir of the uncanny singing in the key of beauty and strangeness.

Journey to Kailash Journey to Kailash by Mike Allen
reviewed by Amal El-Mohtar
Journey to Kailash is a handsomely designed book that brings together the very best of Mike Allen's poetry, collecting almost fifty speculative poems published over the last ten years in a variety of venues, several of which have been nominated for or have won the Rhysling Award.

Clockwork Phoenix Clockwork Phoenix edited by Mike Allen
reviewed by Michael M Jones
Billed as "Tales of Beauty and Strangeness," this anthology is the editor's latest effort to inject a little more weirdness and artistic fantasy into the market, working from his own particular tastes of what he personally enjoys reading. His introduction to the anthology yields little concrete wisdom into the method and madness he used to construct this particular collection of stories, for all its poetic imagery and vivid, dreamlike narrative, but consulting the Clockwork Phoenix web site turns up more solid requirements.

Mythic 2 Mythic 2 edited by Mike Allen
reviewed by Michael M Jones
Back by popular demand, it's the second installment in the fabulously speculative, occasionally baffling anthology series, brought to you by the same people who produce the SF/Fantasy poetry magazine, Mythic Delirium. Once again, a crack team of creative talents has been assembled to put together a collection of short fiction and poetry. One can't say it's entirely unlike anything else you'll find on the shelves, but his half-fiction/half-poetry format is somewhat unusual: too much fiction for the poetry lovers, and too much poetry for the fiction lovers, or so it might seem.

Mythic Mythic edited by Mike Allen
reviewed by Michael M Jones
In this first volume of a new anthology series, the editor brings several aspects of the SF/fantasy field together, creating something that's neither fish nor fowl, but an enjoyable blend of both, kind of like a literary platypus: rich, strange, comical, confusing, thought-provoking and definitely memorable. Here are over a dozen talented writers bringing unique visions of fiction and poetry to life.

BSI Starside: Death Sentence BSI Starside: Death Sentence by Roger MacBride Allen
reviewed by Greg L. Johnson
The problems for Senior Special Agent Hannah Wolfson, and her partner, Jamie Mendez, begin when another Special Agent, Trip Wilcox is found dead in his small spaceship. Wilcox had been on a diplomatic mission, conveying a document from the alien Metrannan back to Earth. The document has been found, but the key to decoding the encryption is gone, and there is reason to suspect that Wilcox was murdered, but not before he found a way to hide the key.

Swords for Hire Swords for Hire by Will Allen
reviewed by Georges T. Dodds
Does it cover all the clichés of heroic fantasy? Sure, it has the malevolent evil bad guy with no face; the not-so-clever bad guy with some socially unacceptable habits; the young man, innocent but ready-for-adventure; the grizzled, if quirky, veteran and master of arms; and naturally, the beautiful but resourceful princess. Sure, the good guys win, the boy gets the girl, the bad guys get their comeuppance. But what pulls it out is that the author makes something new out of these standard characters, makes it funny, keeps the action moving along, and creates an altogether very entertaining work.

Swords for Hire Swords for Hire by Will Allen
reviewed by Cindy Lynn Speer
King Olive is rotting away in a dark, dank dungeon. His only hope is a message that he has managed to smuggle out, written in his own blood. A prisoner of the Boneman, betrayed by his brother who is now the king, he has little hope. King Boonder, a greasy, disgusting creature with a fixation with worms, is content until he hears of this note, and of the unusual heroes who may have gotten it.

Star Wars: Fate of the Jedi: Conviction Star Wars: Fate of the Jedi: Conviction by Aaron Allston
reviewed by David Maddox
The final story arc begins. Tahiri Viel's sentence for the murder of Admiral Pelleon is revealed. The Jedi take action against Daala's growing imperialism. Luke and Ben visit the home world of the evil droch insects in the hopes of finding leads on the missing entity Abeloth and Vestara Khai must finally face her father and her belief in the Sith way of life.

Star Wars: Fate of the Jedi: Backlash Star Wars: Fate of the Jedi: Backlash by Aaron Allston
reviewed by David Maddox
Luke Skywalker and son Ben continue to follow the trail left by Jacen Solo to discover the former Jedi's reasons for becoming the despicable Darth Cadeus. In the Outer Rim of the Galaxy, they find themselves tracked by a mysterious Lost Tribe of Sith and the dark presence that is driving Jedi across the galaxy insane continues to manipulate and promote dissention and mistrust within the Galactic Alliance.

Star Wars: Fate of the Jedi: Outcast Star Wars: Fate of the Jedi: Outcast by Aaron Allston
reviewed by Michael M Jones
Once again, the galaxy is threatened by instability and strife. Once again, the Jedi Order is in the spotlight, and not in a good way. The Jedi are too powerful, too enigmatic, too independent, too likely to go against authority. The distrust is high, especially after the rise and fall of Darth Caedus, formerly Jacen Solo, son of Han Solo and Princess Leia. And when another Jedi, Valin Horn, apparently goes mad and runs amuck, it's all the evidence powerful people need.

Star Wars: Legacy of the Force: Betrayal Star Wars: Legacy of the Force: Betrayal by Aaron Allston
reviewed by David Maddox
The Yuuzhan Vong war is over, the vile race of ruthless conquerors driven away and the defeated New Republic has been reformed into the united Galactic Alliance. Jedi are plentiful, while politicians argue and make decisions for the masses. One would think Luke Skywalker, Han Solo and Princess Leia could take a moment to relax and catch their breath. No chance.

Blood of Winterhold Blood of Winterhold by Stephen Almekinder
reviewed by Lisa DuMond
This novel takes readers back to this fascinating monarchy divided. Picking up almost 20 years after the dramatic close of Winterhold, we return to the politically mad world of the half-kingdoms. The Queen/Lady continues to rule the territory of the Hold, while the King/Lord rules the Camp below. Every moment without open warfare is spent in a tense truce that any change in the balance could shatter.

Winterhold Winterhold by Stephen Almekinder
reviewed by Lisa DuMond
There are addictions to match every personality and every situation. Addictions multiply in a stagnant society... or, maybe addictions result in a stagnant society. On Winterhold, the race to dissolution is a contest between chemicals and rituals; alone or united, they are capable of dragging the civilization into ruin.

Resurrection Resurrection by Steve Alten
reviewed by Charlene Brusso
Michael Gabriel sacrifices himself to destroy a giant "trans-dimensional" serpent during the Rapture of 2012 to save Earth from alien invasion, leaving behind his pregnant lover Dominique Vasquez, who lives in hiding, desperate to protect their unborn children. Gabriel's enemies are led by billionaire Alabama defense contractor-turned-televangelist Peter Mabus, leader of the Fundamentalist Christian political party "People First," who has hired an assassin who's also an ex-CIA mole to kill Dominique.

Goliath Goliath by Steve Alten
reviewed by Cindy Lynn Speer
Sitting inside the combat information center on the Aircraft Carrier Ronald Reagan, Commander Rocky Jackson has been watching the sonar screen. She hears a sound that she thinks is innocent; an orca or similar creature. Her commander agrees with her, but something about the sound bothers her. Before she can figure it out, she hears an explosion and runs to find her husband, only to find he's been murdered. Working her way off the sinking carrier up to the surface, she discovers that she is one of only a handful of survivors; the twelve ship convoy sunk. She also sees Goliath, a huge sting ray-shaped submarine, one that she herself had a hand in engineering.

MEG MEG by Steve Alten
reviewed by Neil Walsh
It's not difficult to see why the book was optioned for a couple of million. It reads like Alten had a Hollywood blockbuster in mind the whole time.

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