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The reviews are sorted alphabetically by authors' last name -- one or more pages for each letter (plus one for Mc). All but some recent reviews are listed here. Links to those reviews appear on the Recent Feature Review Page.

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Hamlet's Father Hamlet's Father by Orson Scott Card
reviewed by David Soyka
Authors have been riffing off of Shakespeare just as Shakespeare himself lifted the plot of Hamlet off of Thomas Kyd. The trick to appropriating someone else's characters and story line, particularly those as canonical as Shakespeare is saying something beyond mere mimicry. Hamlet would be long since forgotten had not Will imbued an old (even for his time) Danish tale with personalities Harold Bloom famously termed "the invention of the human."

Enchantment Enchantment by Orson Scott Card
reviewed by Julie Moncton
As we outgrow our childhood, we say goodbye to many fun traditions. No longer do we believe in the Easter Bunny or hope that the Tooth Fairy will bring us gifts in the night (although some financial assistance for crowns and wisdom teeth extractions would be nice). With adulthood, we stop reading books that begin with "Once upon a time… " But, some days, when work is, well... work, and newspapers are filled with stories about the bad economy, a fairy tale seems like the perfect escape from the real world.

Stonefather Stonefather by Orson Scott Card
reviewed by Steven H Silver
The despised youngest child from a large family, Runnel decides one day to leave his mountain country village. Allowing his feet to carry him, he soon finds himself in the strange lowland city of Mitherhome. Runnel moves from being a ninth, and unwanted child in his mountainous village to being a servant in one of Mitherhome's suburbs. While there, Runnel learn more about the ways of the city and its strange form of magic.

Wyrms Wyrms by Orson Scott Card
an audiobook review by Sarah Trowbridge
Originally published in 1987, this is a quest story involving a teenage girl discovering the truth about her heritage and her birthright, and setting about the fulfillment of her destiny, as decreed by ancient prophecy. Patience learned at the age of five from her father, Lord Peace, that they are the rightful heirs to the throne: part of a long line of Heptarchs that once ruled the entire planet of Imakulata, and have held onto the realm of Korfu for the last thousand years.

A War of Gifts A War of Gifts by Orson Scott Card
reviewed by Steven H Silver
This is a short novella set in the Ender universe during the time that Ender was at the Battle School and before he became Ender the Xenocide. Although Ender appears and plays a pivotal role, the focus of the story is on Zeck Morgan, the Battle School's only pacifist. Zeck sees himself as a victim and a martyr, and here he tries to avenge his perceived persecution on the others students.

Space Boy Space Boy by Orson Scott Card
reviewed by Steven H Silver
Todd is a thirteen-year-old boy who yearns to slip the surly bonds of Earth and explore the vastness of space. Unfortunately, Todd is intelligent enough to understand that he doesn't have enough aptitude in math or the physical requirements to become an astronaut. Instead he spends his days as a typical teenager. Life doesn't begin to get strange for him until the day that he sees a dwarf appear from thin air in his backyard.

Shadow of the Giant Shadow of the Giant by Orson Scott Card
reviewed by Steven H Silver
Orson Scott Card published his first short story, "Ender's Game," in 1977. He later expanded the story into a Hugo and Nebula Award winning novel and turned his attention to sequels. Now, twenty-eight years after "Ender's Game" first appeared, Card has published the eighth novel about Ender and his companions.

The Crystal City The Crystal City by Orson Scott Card
reviewed by Steven H Silver
This is the sixth novel in Orson Scott Card's long-running Alvin Maker series, begun in 1987 with The Seventh Son. This episode opens with Alvin sent by his wife to Neuva Barcelona, at the mouth of the Mizzippy River, for undisclosed reasons. By the end of the novel, Alvin is much closer to his dream of realizing the Crystal City, even if he isn't entirely sure what the exact purpose of the Crystal City is.

Wyrms Wyrms by Orson Scott Card
reviewed by Cindy Lynn Speer
Patience has been trained since she could talk in the arts of diplomacy, and can properly address a politically sensitive letter with one hand while looping a thin strand of plastic around someone's throat with the other. As one of the highest ranking slaves to the king, she has tried not to let the fact that her father, Lord Peace, is the true Heptarch, color her actions.

Songmaster Songmaster by Orson Scott Card
reviewed by Alma A. Hromic
Alma first met Ansset and the Songhouse via the excerpts published in Analog magazine as novella-length stand-alone stories, and immediately fell in love with both the characters and the milieu. Her first encounter with Orson Scott Card as a writer and it is on the strength of this book, this story, that she went on to buy many more of his works.

Ender's Shadow Ender's Shadow by Orson Scott Card
reviewed by Donna McMahon
The street kids in Rotterdam named him Bean because the starving four-year-old was so tiny. But Bean was smart -- in fact, so phenomenally intelligent that he changed the whole social structure of the street and drew himself to the attention of Sister Carlotta, a nun who also happened to be a recruiter for Earth's International Fleet. At five, Bean became the youngest recruit ever sent into orbit to Battle School to join an elite team of children being trained to fight the Buggers -- aliens who threatened to destroy the whole human race.

Ender's Shadow Ender's Shadow by Orson Scott Card
reviewed by Steven H Silver
Ender Wiggin has proved to be a character strong enough to survive through 3 sequels. But the support characters in Ender's Game were relegated to the periphery. Card has now gone back to his original material to bring one of these characters, Bean, to the forefront. Bean's story is a novel in its own right, rather than a mere re-telling or a cashing in on Card's earlier successes.

Enchantment Enchantment by Orson Scott Card
reviewed by Ken Newquist
This is a time-travelling story showing what happens when the fairy tale ends. In traditional tales, the knight kisses the princess, she wakes up, and they live happily ever after. In Enchantment, that's just the beginning.

Heartfire Heartfire by Orson Scott Card
reviewed by Steven H Silver
Steven feels that this long-awaited fifth book sets the Alvin Maker series back on the right track. An overriding theme to Heartfire is Card's examination of the degradation of people. By looking for their heartfires, Alvin's wife Peggy discovers the vastly different circumstances of the enslaved peoples she is struggling to free.

Homebody Homebody by Orson Scott Card
reviewed by Marc Goldstein
Call it a ghost story or a gothic romance, one thing is certain about this novel: it is not science fiction. One of the most celebrated SF authors of the last twenty years, Card has a passion for characterization and spirituality that makes him exceptional in any genre. In this novel, he skillfully builds the paranoia and suspense, cranking it up to fever pitch for the breathless finalé.

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