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Godslayer Godslayer by Jacqueline Carey
reviewed by David Soyka
J.R.R. Tolkien is frequently faulted, though not entirely fairly, for a one dimensional portrayal of good versus evil. Jacqueline Carey's Sundering series (of which Godslayer concludes the tale begun in Banewreaker), takes several Tolkienesque tropes and forges them into something more nuanced. This is Carey's Paradise Lost version of The Lord of the Rings.

Banewreaker Banewreaker by Jacqueline Carey
reviewed by David Soyka
The gods in the form of the Seven Shapers are still amidst us, but the siblings are quarreling. Satoris, the youngest god, gets cast out by eldest brother Haomane for getting too chummy with Men, and in the process suffers a deep wound that does not heal. A prophecy predicts the resulting imbalance, caused by this banishment, between both the gods and the races of creation will be healed and harmony restored with the destruction of Satoris.

Kushiel's Chosen Kushiel's Chosen by Jacqueline Carey
reviewed by Regina Lynn Preciado
This sequel to Kushiel's Dart opens with a choice. Phèdre has received her sangoire cloak from her nemesis and obsession Melisande -- it's a challenge to a high-stakes game of thrones, risking lives at every step. If Phèdre accepts the challenge, she risks losing the love of her Perfect Companion, Joscelin. But if she does not, what will happen to Queen Ysandre, and to Terra d'Ange itself?

Kushiel's Chosen Kushiel's Chosen by Jacqueline Carey
reviewed by William Thompson
In the aftermath of Kushiel's Dart, Phèdre had retired to her country estate, leaving the political intrigue of the court as well as her devotion to Naamah behind. The continued presence and spidery interest of Melisande, her malign nemesis and intrigante, in the world of Terre D'Ange politics, is made aparent by the delivery of a cloak. As well as marking the opening move in a new ploy for power, it spurs Phèdre to return to her earlier role of spy disguised behind the blandishments and seductions of an anguissette. Her return to the Court and City of Elua, however, is not welcomed by everyone.

Kushiel's Dart Kushiel's Dart by Jacqueline Carey
reviewed by Victoria Strauss
Phèdre, unwanted child of a former adept of the opulent pleasure houses of the Night Court, is born with a red mote in her eye. To most, this is an unsightly flaw. Only a few understand its rare, true meaning: Phèdre is an anguisette, chosen victim of Kushiel, angel of chastisement, called to receive pleasure in the form of pain. One who recognizes Phèdre's value is Anafiel Delaunay, a nobleman with a false name and a secret past. He purchases her indenture, and sets about training her as a singular and special courtesan -- and also as a spy, to serve his enigmatic quest for knowledge within the glittering tangle of court politics.

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