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The reviews are sorted alphabetically by authors' last name -- one or more pages for each letter (plus one for Mc). All but some recent reviews are listed here. Links to those reviews appear on the Recent Feature Review Page.

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Echo Echo by Jack McDevitt
an audiobbok review by Steven Brandt
It all started innocently enough. A woman places a local ad to have a stone tablet removed from the house she recently purchased. The tablet made a nice centerpiece for her garden for a while, but now she is tired of it and is willing to offer it to anyone willing to come and haul it away. Interstellar antiquities dealer Alex Benedict is instantly intrigued by the photo of the stone, which is inscribed with runes that do not appear to be in any language known to man. Alex and his assistant, Chase Kolpath, have no idea that they are about to embark on a path that could uncover a monumental tragedy that occurred thirty years ago -- if they live long enough to reach its conclusion.

Outbound Outbound by Jack McDevitt
reviewed by Greg L. Johnson
This book is a collection of stories and essays from throughout the author's career. What they reveal is a writer whose work is firmly within and a part of the modern science fiction tradition. The stories also show a concern for events, and their consequences, that are a little closer to the here and now than readers usually find in his more future-centered, space-oriented novels.

Polaris Polaris by Jack McDevitt
reviewed by Steven Sawicki
We return to the universe inhabited by Alex Benedict and Chase Kolpath, last seen in A Talent For War (1988). Benedict is a seller of antiquarian artifacts mostly having to do with space travel and he's got a current crop from the spaceship Polaris. Decades earlier, the Polaris ran into trouble, sent out an SOS but when help arrived, was found adrift and empty. The Polaris had been chartered to take a mixed group of individuals to witness the death of a far-off solar system. Benedict's interest is piqued when someone apparently wants these artifacts destroyed, along with anyone who gets in the way.

Chindi Chindi by Jack McDevitt
reviewed by Greg L. Johnson
We're dropped into a whirlwind of a novel, as the Captain and crew of the City of Memphis journey from one awe-inspiring, death-defying adventure to the next. It starts when a strange signal, and the relay system passing it on, is discovered around a nearby neutron star. Priscilla Hutchins, a starship captain who has become a little bored with the routine of hauling freight from one star system to the next, is hired to lead an expedition to follow the signal and find out who or what is at the other end.

Moonfall Moonfall by Jack McDevitt
reviewed by Donna McMahon
The novel begins as Vice President Charlie Haskell arrives on the moon to preside over a terrific photo op -- the official ribbon-cutting of an ambitious new moonbase, which promises to make the space program not just feasible, but economically profitable. Unfortunately for Haskell, astronomers have just discovered a large interstellar wanderer (comet) heading for a collision with Earth's moon. In five days moon and moonbase will be smashed into a cloud of rubble.

Deepsix Deepsix by Jack McDevitt
reviewed by Hank Luttrell
This is a pressure cooker of a novel. Intense popular and scientific interest is focused on a planet destined to be destroyed by a collision with a gas giant. Teams of scientists and tourists have gathered in starships to watch the fireworks. At the last minute, archaeological remains are discovered on the planet. A make-shift, emergency team is sent to the surface to study and collect everything it can grab.

Infinity Beach Infinity Beach by Jack McDevitt
reviewed by Greg L. Johnson
This novel is, in the end, a kind of story that the author does very well. There are mysteries to be solved, both personal and scientific, and the background is well thought out, both in the human society depicted and in the astronomical details that play a part in the narrative.

Infinity Beach Infinity Beach by Jack McDevitt
reviewed by Catherine Asaro
This novel is an engrossing science fiction mystery. In addition to telling a great story, it offers the reader thoughtful questions about what it means for humanity to mature rather than stagnate as a species. The author has served up another exciting, literate yarn.

Moonfall Moonfall by Jack McDevitt
reviewed by Steven H Silver
In celebration of his 200th review (to browse others, drop by Steven's Web site), Steven chose to read Moonfall. Jack McDevitt has a clear writing style which allows him to fully participate in the act of storytelling. He has ideas which, when you read them, make you say, "Wow, that's cool!" without being dropped out of the story. SF needs more storytellers like Jack McDevitt.

Eternity Road Eternity Road by Jack McDevitt
reviewed by Steven H Silver
In a post-apocalyptic world, civilization is just re-beginning. Steven tells us that McDevitt has shown himself capable of better work.

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