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The reviews are sorted alphabetically by authors' last name -- one or more pages for each letter (plus one for Mc). All but some recent reviews are listed here. Links to those reviews appear on the Recent Feature Review Page.

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Down to the Bone Down to the Bone by Justina Robson
reviewed by David Soyka
Let's give credit where credit is due. Others may be content to churn out endless series of medieval quests of good versus evil, vampires in love, zombies in suits, young wizards, elves and dragons, pirate stories, cyberpunk or faerie folklore. Justina Robson's ambition is to mash together an amalgamation of all these, while throwing in some thoughts about quantum mechanics and alternate universes, rock and roll, self-empowerment and probably a half dozen or so other things.

Chasing the Dragon Chasing the Dragon by Justina Robson
reviewed by David Soyka
So, when you're four volumes into the Quantum Gravity series, a fantasy adventure that manages to pull off a tongue-in-cheek collage of comic book action heroines, the Six-Million-Dollar Woman, James Bond, sword and sorcery, self-help bromides, archetypical folk tales and just about every epic high fantasy trope, what do you do to top yourself and keep the mix interesting?

Living Next Door to the God of Love Living Next Door to the God of Love by Justina Robson
reviewed by Nathan Brazil
It seems appropriate to begin this review with a nod to Procul Harum, as reading it makes one feel like one skipped the light fandango, turned cartwheels across the floor, and was feeling rather seasick. What the author does in this work is a disjointed, post-cyberpunk exploration of human nature. The setting is a surreal, narcotic-washed future, in which AI is fully in control of both virtual and actual reality. Gene manipulation, possession and magic all play their parts, sometimes to fine effect.

Keeping It Real Keeping It Real by Justina Robson
reviewed by David Soyka
Lila Black was brutally tortured; what was left of the young woman, primarily the head and torso, has been surgically merged into a nuclear-powered and AI-augmented mechanical body. Moreover, she's outfitted with an array of weaponry and associated gizmos that would make James Bond's "Q" gadgeteer supply master positively green with envy. And at 21, Lila is also in her sexual prime, which adds to the already considerable psychological dilemma of being half-human, half-machine.

Living Next Door to the God of Love Living Next Door to the God of Love by Justina Robson
reviewed by Greg L. Johnson
The novel deals with the stuff of myth and legend. Desire and lust, self-sacrifice and the desire to merge into a greater whole are the essence of Jalaeka, the seemingly god-like character who draws all the other characters towards him and into his goals and plans. And it all takes place within a thoroughly hard science fiction framework, a landscape determined by the mathematics of string theory, with beings beyond human comprehension capable of manipulating space and time in all eleven dimensions.

Silver Screen Silver Screen by Justina Robson
reviewed by David Soyka
The title refers to the black and white cinema of the mid-twentieth century when movie stars were literally larger than life depictions back in the days before Internet circulation of celebrity sex tapes shrunk them down to size. The analogy is that the interface between human and machine intelligence mimics the quality of these films in that they are seemingly real, but at the same time obviously not. It also underlies a conceit where avatars projected by the machine to interact with humans appear as classic screen idols such as Humphrey Bogart and James Dean and, of course, the symbolic baggage they carry.

Silver Screen Silver Screen by Justina Robson
reviewed by Jakob Schmidt
AI-psychologist Anjuli O'Connel's friends really give her a hard time: the obsessed genius Roy Croft is suddenly lying dead in his bedroom, leaving her with cryptic clues obviously designed to make his dreams of machine evolution come true. Just before his death, he filed against OptiNet, the company employing him and Anjuli, at the World Court of Human Rights. His case is about granting legal subject status to the artificial intelligence 901 -- an entity attached to Anjuli by more than just a professional relationship.

Natural History Natural History by Justina Robson
reviewed by Peter D. Tillman
The Forged, vat-born cyborg post-humans who do most of the heavy lifting in the 26th century, are getting tired of kowtowing to the Old Monkeys, the Unevolved guys who created them: us. As the book opens, Voyager Lonestar Isol has just made a disastrous First Contact with a mysterious alien artifact on her way to explore Barnard's Star.

Natural History Natural History by Justina Robson
reviewed by Martin Lewis
We've grown used to thinking of ourselves as the pinnacle of evolution but in this novel, the massed ranks of humanity find themselves the Unevolved. No longer the greatest ape, they are mere Monkeys. Or so the Forged would have them believe. The Forged are still human, at least technically, but they are also unequivocally other. They want self-determination so they can shake off their deterministic lives.

Mappa Mundi Mappa Mundi by Justina Robson
reviewed by Lisa DuMond
Dr. Natalie Armstrong's dream is to break through the code of the mind. Someday, her work may enable doctors to repair damaged brains and cure the mentally ill. She sees nothing but positive results coming from her discoveries, but she hasn't reckoned with powers that have been keeping a close eye on her progress. The time is coming when the benefits of her research will be snatched away from her and used in a way she will violently oppose. And she never saw it coming.

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