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The reviews are sorted alphabetically by authors' last name -- one or more pages for each letter (plus one for Mc). All but some recent reviews are listed here. Links to those reviews appear on the Recent Feature Review Page.

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J. J. by William Sanders
reviewed by Rich Horton
One woman, once a NASA scientist working on a Mars mission, is trapped in a mental institution, desperately trying to find a reason or a cure for the terrible dreams that trouble her. Another woman faces a shootout with several men in an abandoned New Mexico town, decades after a nuclear war destroyed civilization -- and she too faces terrible dreams which have driven her lover away. A third woman has turned to drink, amid the ruins of her SF writing career and the ravages of her own terrible nightmares. Mysteriously, these 3 women, from three different worlds, find themselves together, facing dangers and the threats of mysterious human-like but invulnerable beings who can chase them from world to world.

Smoke Smoke by William Sanders
reviewed by Rich Horton
This mystery novel features a Cherokee woodcarver from Oklahoma named Hosea Smoke. He is spending a week at a small college in Oklahoma City, at a Native American art fair, exhibiting his carvings. Among the other exhibitors is a rather obnoxious man named Esau Brown, suspected by many of faking his claims to Indian ancestry. When Smoke and his nephew Mason Littlehorse discover the dead body of Esau Brown, there are plenty of suspects, including a man who was trying to get him thrown out of the exhibition for being a phony Indian, his ex-wife, and possibly even Justin Hatner, the very rich oilman who had earlier felt defrauded by Brown.

Journey to Fusang Journey to Fusang by William Sanders
reviewed by Rich Horton
After the Mongols continued into Western Europe and laid it to waste, Europe continued as a backwater. North America was separately colonized on the East Coast by Islamic people and on the West Coast by the Chinese. Several centuries later, Finn and his buddies, Yusuf and Alfred, escape an Arabic slave ship, find themselves on the Great Plains (with a beautiful redhead named Maeve) and decide to head for the Chinese colony, called Fusang.

Are We Having Fun Yet? Are We Having Fun Yet? by William Sanders
reviewed by Lisa DuMond
This collection is the closest thing to an evening spent drinking beers and getting to know the real man. The dry wit, the intelligence, the unshakable pride, and the humility are waiting for you in every word. This is more a friend than a book, an introduction to one of the genre's very best.

The Ballad of Billy Badass and the Rose of Turkestan The Ballad of Billy Badass and the Rose of Turkestan by William Sanders
reviewed by Lisa DuMond
This is most likely unlike any novel you've come across lately. Forget the fact that it sways between science fiction, fantasy, and horror. This is a story of horrifying truths, deadly lies, and people pushed aside since long before current memory.

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