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The Caryatids The Caryatids by Bruce Sterling
reviewed by Rich Horton
Set in 2060, after the world has collapsed, more or less, both ecologically and politically, there are three major players in this new world: the one remaining influential nation state, China; and a couple of extra-national organizations: the Dispensation, a fairly Capitalist grouping; and Acquis, a sort of techno-Socialist entity. The latter two groups are explicitly (in their minds) engaged in "saving the world," while China is being China.

The Caryatids The Caryatids by Bruce Sterling
reviewed by Derek Johnson
Told in three sections with a different clone sister as viewpoint character in each, the book opens in the 2060s, thirty years after idealistic revolutionary Yelisaveta Mihajlovic has cloned seven daughters and one son -- the caryatids of the title -- to save the world from ecological collapse. Dispersed by political turmoil which results in the death of three, the surviving siblings are scattered throughout the globe, while their mother escapes to Earth orbit.

Visionary in Residence Visionary in Residence by Bruce Sterling
reviewed by Greg L. Johnson
In the blink of an adult lifetime, Bruce Sterling has gone from fiery young literary radical to respected spokesman and commentator. Works such as Schismatrix and Islands in the Net, along with editing Mirrorshades, the defining cyberpunk anthology, quickly established his reputation in science fiction. Non-fiction like The Hacker Crackdown and a continual presence on the internet have given him name recognition and influence outside his science fiction audience.

Visionary in Residence Visionary in Residence by Bruce Sterling
reviewed by Paul Kincaid
It is a curious thing when the cutting edge starts to become blunt, as if the future is no longer what we imagined it might be. Bruce Sterling we remember as the author of "Taklamakan" and "Bicycle Repairman" and a dozen other stories that sliced so deep into the future that they made it bleed. But in this collection, while Sterling remains as hip to new ideas as ever he was, there is nothing that even breaks the skin.

A Good Old Fashioned Future A Good Old Fashioned Future by Bruce Sterling
reviewed by Donna McMahon
This collection contains seven stories set in the near future, all of which feature international settings, clever high tech detail and interesting ideas. He certainly has a feel for globalization. In "The Littlest Jackel," for instance, Russian mafioso hire Bosnian mercenaries to help Finnish separatists stage a rebellion in the Aland islands, so the Russians can use the Alands as a handy site for various shady business ventures, such as laundering rubles in Japan via Finnish toys.

Zeitgeist Zeitgeist by Bruce Sterling
reviewed by David Soyka
Leggy Starlitz is a cynical, middle-aged, amoral promoter whose latest brainstorm is G-7 -- an all-girl band of interchangeable and easily replaceable personalities known to their adoring fans only by their country of origin, e.g. "The American One" or "The French One." The joke here is that G-7 is the term used to refer to the 7 governments that comprise the world's economic powers. The less charitable would describe them as capitalist countries looking to exploit less developed nations.

Zeitgeist Zeitgeist by Bruce Sterling
reviewed by Hank Luttrell
This fantastic, hilarious novel provides a solid dose of nostalgia for Y2K. Remember when your brother-in-law refurbished his ammo reloading gear and bought a generator? Which he kept in the living room? And everyone's spouse had a job involving Y2K "compliance," as it was called? Including Marge Simpson?

A Good Old-Fashioned Future A Good Old-Fashioned Future by Bruce Sterling
reviewed by Ken Newquist
The title brings to mind stratospheric buildings, automated dog-runs, sky cars and robots, robots, robots. Then there is a Bruce Sterling future -- a post-cyberpunk dystopia where the Western powers are in decline or fighting to hold the line and technology has become the world's greatest liberator and curse.

Distraction Distraction by Bruce Sterling
reviewed by Ernest Lilley
It's 2044, and America just isn't what it used to be. Cities are privately owned, Caucasians are a distrusted minority, and the country is governed by permanent "Emergency Committees." Guest reviewer Ernest Lilley, editor of the prestigious SF Revu, takes a look at what may be Sterling's best novel yet.

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