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Sequential Art
by Matthew Peckham
Firstly, thanks to Scott Tilson for very graciously allowing me access to a column he founded and smartly penned; I will do my best to carry on the mission, Scott.

Second, what you're looking at is a compilation of one week's worth of comics, selected variably, listed alphabetically, and sorted by week of release. (It's probably too much to read in one sitting, but at the same time a mere fraction of what's happening in this market today.)

Finally, don't look for frequent reviews of the more popular stuff here, e.g. Spider-Man or Batman, X-Men or JLA -- they get plenty of attention at the sites you can link to through our handy comics index. Instead, we'll be dipping into a combination of the low print run mainstream and independent, alternative, web-based or small press stuff. If there's a series or book you want to see or think ought to be reviewed here, drop me a line.

[Editor's Note: Here you will find a popup window for Sequential Art Links.]

Sequential Art Sequential Art
a column by Matthew Peckham
What if virtual reality was instead "reality" experienced virtually through remote-controlled bodies? Would crimes like rape or other forms of physical assault be felonies, or just "property damage"? What sort of world might it be if everyone locked themselves away and filled it with stand-ins? Top Shelf's new trade collection of Robert Venditti's The Surrogates mini-series explores those and other issues in a weird future where humans interact vicariously through robotic simulacrums.

Sequential Art Sequential Art
a column by Matthew Peckham
From the title, a chimera is "an imaginary monster made up of incongruous parts." And indeed that description fittingly characterizes what follows in Italian artist Lorenzo Mattotti's Chimera, a kind of black and white narrative phantasmagoria.

Sequential Art Sequential Art
a column by Matthew Peckham
Grant Morrison's Seven Soldiers is being marketed by DC as "the most ambitious new storytelling venture in modern comics history," an attempt to "redefine the concept of the super-hero," "a colossal tale unlike any seen in comics before."

Sequential Art Sequential Art
a column by Matthew Peckham
Revenge of the Sith is a poorly told tale of power corrupting the insecure and narcissistic, i.e. insert a coin into any number of Eastern philosophies and out pops an outline to match Lucas's juvenile distillations... if my inner-apologist was still hoping that George might at least go one for three, this final story has me washing my hands of any further exculpation.

Sequential Art Sequential Art
a column by Matthew Peckham
After twenty-five issues of hard-boiled horror-noir, current series writer Mike Carey celebrates magician-quipster John Constantine's 200th birthday --- issue #200, that is, and it's a three-part expanded length forty-page whopper of a shift in direction for this acerbic occult serial. If you've been reading the series and thought you'd seen it all, guess again -- Carey drops a bomb that if nurtured properly, could rock the series for years to come.

Sequential Art Sequential Art      7 September 2004
a column by Matthew Peckham
Beckett Comics' The Ballad of Sleeping Beauty #1 arrived in July on Free Comic Book Day to rousing reviews and enthusiastic fans. Two months later, Matt takes a look at the first and second issues to see how this sold-out supernatural western from a fledgling indie publisher is holding up.

Sequential Art Sequential Art      26 August 2004
a column by Matthew Peckham
After a long and controversial award-winning run, Alan Moore rounds off his final Promethea story arc by successfully annihilating reality and the world -- as we know it.

Sequential Art Sequential Art      8 August 2004
a column by Matthew Peckham
Eisner and Harvey award-winning writer/artist Craig Thompson split with his girlfriend and hit the road earlier this year, beating a path to Europe and beyond. Matt takes a look at Craig's sequential travelogue, an odyssey of sights and sentiments for the senses.

Sequential Art Sequential Art      28 July 2004
a column by Matthew Peckham
This week Matt checks out Vertigo's answer to all those witchy teenage TV shows, Warren Ellis's brand new work for the evil empire, and the 2004 Eisner-award winning muscle-headed one in his own monthly; includes a complete list of the just-announced 2004 Eisner award-winners.

Sequential Art Sequential Art      21 July 2004
a column by Matthew Peckham
This week Matt scrutinizes Craig Thompson and James Kochalka's Conversation #1, and rediscovers the joys of heartbreaking dialectic.

Sequential Art Sequential Art      12 July 2004
a column by Matthew Peckham
This week Matt takes the reboot of Brian Michael Bendis's award-winning Powers series to the mat, and gives American Splendor artist Josh Neufeld's The Vagabonds a belated look.

Sequential Art Sequential Art      5 July 2004
a column by Matthew Peckham
Street Angel is an out of nowhere inexplicable burst of hilarity, an offbeat mélange of Kill Bill, Pinky and the Brain, Austin Powers, alternate conquistador history, ninja lore, street brawling, restaurant kitchen repartee, basketball court kung fu, and just in case you're afraid it's missing anything -- instructions on how to wield a bo staff.

Sequential Art Sequential Art      21 June 2004
a column by Matthew Peckham
If a picture is worth a thousand words, then the all-comics McSweeney's #13, with 3,732 pictures, clocks in at the content equivalent of 12 copies of War and Peace.

Sequential Art Sequential Art      7 June 2004
a column by Matthew Peckham
This week Matt takes a look at fellow SF Site writer and comic strip luminary Rick Norwood's Comics Revue #217, a monthly periodical collecting such classic comic strips as Flash Gordon, Tarzan, Gasoline Alley, Krazy Kat, and many more.

Sequential Art Sequential Art      14 April 2004
a column by Matthew Peckham
Matthew Peckham reviews selected titles of one week's worth of comics. But don't look for frequent reviews of the more popular stuff here, e.g. Spider-Man or Batman, X-Men or JLA -- they get plenty of attention. Instead, he is dipping into a combination of the low print run mainstream and independent, alternative, web-based or small press stuff.

Sequential Art Sequential Art      31 March 2004
a column by Matthew Peckham
Matthew Peckham reviews selected titles of one week's worth of comics. But don't look for frequent reviews of the more popular stuff here, e.g. Spider-Man or Batman, X-Men or JLA -- they get plenty of attention. Instead, he is dipping into a combination of the low print run mainstream and independent, alternative, web-based or small press stuff.

Sequential Art Sequential Art      17 March 2004
a column by Matthew Peckham
Matthew Peckham reviews selected titles of one week's worth of comics. But don't look for frequent reviews of the more popular stuff here, e.g. Spider-Man or Batman, X-Men or JLA -- they get plenty of attention. Instead, he is dipping into a combination of the low print run mainstream and independent, alternative, web-based or small press stuff.

Sequential Art Sequential Art      3 March 2004
a column by Matthew Peckham
Matthew Peckham reviews selected titles of one week's worth of comics. But don't look for frequent reviews of the more popular stuff here, e.g. Spider-Man or Batman, X-Men or JLA -- they get plenty of attention. Instead, he is dipping into a combination of the low print run mainstream and independent, alternative, web-based or small press stuff.


In over two decades of reading science fiction & fantasy, prose or sequential art form, Scott has come to see there's an inversion of Sturgeon's Law: ten percent of everything is at least good or better. He is also a regular panelist at Canada's largest SF convention.

Will Eisner is the creator of Spirit and one of the founders of the original graphic novel form. He called comics "The Sequential Art" and it is to him this column is dedicated.

Sequential Art Sequential Art
a column by Scott Tilson
Scott Tilson is taking a look at what has caught his attention in the field of graphic novels. This time, he is recommending author Frank Miller and artist Dave Gibbons' Give Me Liberty and Preacher: Gone To Texas by author Garth Ennis and artist Steve Dillon. And Scott asks George R.R. Martin what he's reading these days.

Sequential Art Sequential Art
a column by Scott Tilson
Scott Tilson is taking a look at what has caught his attention in the field of graphic novels. This time, he is recommending Heart of Empire and The Wizard's Tale. And Scott asks Brenda W. Clough what she's reading these days.

Sequential Art Sequential Art
a column by Scott Tilson
Scott Tilson is taking a look at what has caught his attention in the field of graphic novels. This time, he is recommending Yukinobu Hoshino's 2001 Nights and Mark Smylie's Artesia. And Scott asks Joe Haldeman what he's reading these days.

Sequential Art Sequential Art
a column by Scott Tilson
Scott Tilson is SF Site's new columnist. He'll be taking a look at what has caught his attention in the field of graphic novels. This time, he is recommending Transmetropolitan and The Magic of Aria. And Scott asks Greg Bear what he's reading these days.

Copyright © 2004 Matthew Peckham


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