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Interview: James Sarafin on “Trapping the Pleistocene”

– Tell us a bit about “Trapping the Pleistocene.”

It’s based on my last trip to the Pleistocene, except the otter scene; I made that up.

 

– What was the inspiration for this story, or what prompted you to write it?

A few years ago on www.trapperman.com, some of the people posting there were talking about how interesting it would be to trap the giant furbearers of the Pleistocene. I began playing around with that concept to see if I could make a story out of it. I wasn’t aware of any other SF story focused on trapping furbearers, so I decided to try to write the first. At least I think it’s the first.

 

– Was “Trapping the Pleistocene” personal to you in any way?  If so, how?

I grew up on the edge of farm country on the west side of Columbus, Ohio, so I thought it would be fun to set the story in that part of the country. I always loved the outdoors and spent a lot of time tramping the fields and woods behind my house. When I was in high school a friend showed me how to trap muskrats, and I was amazed that a fur buyer would actually pay you money for the pelts. I thought it beat working at McDonald’s, so I began running my own trapline for muskrats, mink, raccoon, and fox, checking my traps every morning before school. There were no beaver or otter in Ohio in those days, or at least very few. (Individual trappers and trappers’ organizations have been instrumental in restoring these and other fur-bearer populations in the Lower 48.) I should also mention that one of my brothers runs a seventy-mile wilderness trapline here in Alaska. It’s his winter job; summers he works as a fisheries biologist.

 

– What kind of research did you do for this story?

Beaver behavior and trapping methods I learned from trapperman.com, to the extent they might be applicable to a beaver the size of a bear. Also I researched astronomy (thanks to www.cloudynights.com) and tried to figure out where some of the nearer stars might be positioned 25,000 years ago. That latter bit was a toughie; any inaccuracies should be blamed on the vagaries of our galaxy, not on the author.

 

– What are you working on now?

A mainstream novel. Also have a few science fiction and fantasy short story ideas percolating in my head, where things take a while to develop.

 

– Anything else you’d like to add?

Trappers get kind of a bum rap in today’s world, and a lot of people don’t even realize they still exist. Trappers tend to have a keen interest and love of the outdoors, and care about the renewable resources they harvest every fall and winter. Will trapping survive the next hundred years? For this story I imagined it might survive on agrarian enclaves that preserve the rural culture.

“Trapping the Pleistocene” appears in the May/June 2015 issue of F&SF.

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