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F&SF Submissions Will Be Temporarily Closed for July

IMPORTANT NOTICE: The electronic submissions form for Fantasy & Science Fiction will be closed temporarily from 12:01 A.M., Pacific Time, U.S.A., on Sunday, July 1, 2018, until 11:59 P.M., Pacific Time, U.S.A., on Tuesday, July 31, 2018. This will allow us to reply to all the submissions currently in the queue and catch up with all our email and other editorial work. Submissions will reopen on August 1.

Paper submissions via the postal service will still be accepted, but we do not expect to be able to reply to any received during July until after August 1.

When it comes to paper submissions vs. electronic submissions, our editor strongly prefers for writers to use the online form. The online system is free to use and it means that you don’t need to worry about the cost of postage or stamps. In addition, using the online form will give you a tracking number, so you can follow the progress of your story through our system. On our end, it lets us keep all correspondence about a story in one place while putting the submission on our to-do list every day until we reply. Electronic submissions take about a quarter of the time to handle administratively, giving us more time to read the stories and pay attention to the writing. And the first thing we have to do when we buy something sent by snail mail is contact the writer and ask them to send us an electronic file. Our current median response time for online submissions is about 4 days, so the turnaround is also usually going to be faster for online submissions.

A reminder that our online submission form is available at: https://ccfinlay.moksha.io/publication/fsf

Interview: Lisa Mason on “The Bicycle Whisperer”

Lisa MasonTell us a bit about “The Bicycle Whisperer.”

The title references the 1995 novel, The Horse Whisperer by Nicholas Evans and the story’s plot evokes some of the novel’s essentials. A girl and her beloved horse are severely injured in an accident. The injuries aren’t just physical, but also emotional. In a desperate attempt to heal girl and horse, the girl’s mother takes her on an arduous cross-country trip in search of a man with an uncanny sympathy with horses, especially damaged horses. A horse whisperer. He helps heal both the girl and the horse and reconciles horse with rider.

Readers and reviewers have responded emotionally to “The Bicycle Whisperer”, some disturbed by the end, some finding the story sad, some believing the forgiveness. I’m just glad people are responding emotionally. Emotions are what fiction is all about, even science fiction.

 

What was the inspiration for this story, or what prompted you to write it?

I was pushing a shopping cart out of the grocery store when I noticed a teenager wandering around the parking lot. He was hitting up shoppers for money. They ignored or shunned him. He had that confused, despondent look of someone who had just been kicked out of the house or fled from there, for his own reasons.

I put my groceries in the car and rummaged around in the glove compartment. I almost never carry cash these days! I found only a crumpled dollar, approached him, and offered it. I said, “Promise me you won’t spend this on drugs.” He gratefully took the dollar and said, “I promise.” I said, “Are you going to be okay?” He gave me a sunny smile and said, “Sure.” And it was like looking down into his soul.

When I drove away, imagining what his life was like, the Lone Rangerette stepped out of the shadows and said, “Forget about him, you are going to write about me!” “The Bicycle Whisperer” is as much her story as Shimano Stella’s and Simon’s. With luck and work, the Lone Rangerette, her sentient bicycle Scout Regalia, and her mobile AI Tekto may have their own YA novel in a year or so.

 

Was “The Bicycle Whisperer” personal to you in any way? If so, how?

I’m fascinated by people’s propensity to anthropomorphize everything. From the love we lavish on our pets (I’m a crazy cat lover myself) to attachments people form to inanimate objects. I had a college friend who was inordinately attached to his beat-up Chevy. He’d gone through several unhappy romantic relationships, but his car—he called her “Clementine”—stayed with him through thick and thin. Just the other day, a reader posted on my Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/lisa.mason.7393264), saying how much he appreciated the story and that he seriously loved his bicycle from 1974 when he was in college in Austin, Texas. And he referred to his bicycle as “she.”

I’ve enjoyed the sentient car stories recently published in F&SF so I was inspired to write about a sentient bicycle and her troubles. It’s not so far of a stretch to imagine how emotionally attached people could become to AI. Would AI have emotions, too? By definition not, but it’s fun to imagine that they would.

 

What are you working on now?

More stories, always! The YA mentioned above, set in a gritty near-future. A high-concept SF novel. And an urban fantasy. I’m even revisiting a concept I filed in the to-do box, involving a woman detective in 1960s San Francisco. The latter is not fantasy or science fiction, but I enjoy mysteries and should probably write at least one.

 

Anything else you’d like to add?

As always, people can visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for my newly reissued trade paperback books, ebooks, interviews, blogs, adorable cat pictures, and my husband Tom Robinson’s bespoke art, mobiles, and jewelry. My latest novella, published in trade paperback and as an ebook, is One Day in the Life of Alexa, and has been well received with five-star reviews.

 

“The Bicycle Whisperer” appears in the May/June 2018 issue of F&SF.

You can buy a copy of the issue here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/toc1805.htm

You can subscribe to the print edition of F&SF here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/subscribe.htm

You can subscribe to the electronic edition of F&SF at the following links:

Weightless Books (non-Kindle): https://weightlessbooks.com/category/publisher/spilogale-inc/

Amazon US (Kindle edition): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/

Amazon UK (Kindle edition): http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/

Interview: Pip Coen on “Inquisitive”

Tell us a bit about “Inquisitive.”

“Inquisitive” is a story about Saffi, a child who’s born into a society she doesn’t understand, without access to the knowledge that she desperately wants. That knowledge is guarded by a political and economic powerhouse called The Inquisition. We follow Saffi’s unrepentant pursuit of a position within The Inquisition, but when she finally gets there, she realizes it wasn’t without help.

 Pip Coen

What was the inspiration for this story, or what prompted you to write it?

I first started writing “Inquisitive” about five years ago, and then rewrote it after attending The Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers’ Workshop in 2015. I can rarely remember the initial prompts for my stories, and they often evolve beyond recognition by the final paragraph anyway. In the end, this story is an amalgamation of things I enjoy writing about, like the interface between science and society, memory manipulation, individuals that don’t fit into an established niche, and of course, not having enough time to read everything I want to!

 

Was “Inquisitive” personal to you in any way?  If so, how?

The society of Aypiria explores a few questions that I’m passionate about. Elements like the misuse of technology and public access to scientific research are two issues frequently on my mind. But I’m also passionate about understanding how information is processed in the brain. Most people think nothing of our ability to recognize social cues like questions, jokes, and sarcasm, but this is really an incredible computational feat. For neuroatypical individuals who can’t naturally process these cues, the world can be a difficult place.

 

Can you tell us about any of the research you may have done for this story?

One thing I love about writing speculative fiction is that imagination can substitute for a lot of research. I tend to write stories where the only realism I need to worry about is the emotional realism of my characters—and I probably don’t worry about it enough! Since I’m a neuroscientist by trade, most of the technical elements in this story are things that I’m familiar with, but rest assured, they are wildly exaggerated. Selectively erasing memories will never be possible … probably ;)

 

You utilize epigraphs throughout your story to flesh out the history of the Aypirian Monarchy and the Inquisition.  How important is world-building to you as a writer, and how much world-building did you do for this story that didn’t make it onto the page?

Worldbuilding often forms an integral part of my stories, but I try not to get too bogged down in the world before I start writing about it. I usually vacillate between writing scenes, discovering issues with the world, and then taking some time to flesh out my half-baked world mechanics until I feel I can move forward with the plot. So aside from some deleted scenes, there isn’t much of Aypirian society that didn’t make it onto the page. I should add that many of the stories I love have surreal and inconsistent worlds, but I’ve never managed to free myself from the tethers of consistency when writing.

 

What are you working on now?

I’m passionate about short stories as a medium, and I see myself continuing to work on them for some time. I enjoy the freedom to explore different conceits and characters in a shorter length—even if a lot of those explorations don’t result in a story. That said, I’m finishing up a piece that’s on the far end of novelette length which I’m particularly excited about. I hope to find a home for it soon.

 

“Inquisitive” appears in the May/June 2018 issue of F&SF.

You can buy a copy of the issue here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/toc1805.htm

You can subscribe to the print edition of F&SF here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/subscribe.htm

You can subscribe to the electronic edition of F&SF at the following links:

Weightless Books (non-Kindle): https://weightlessbooks.com/category/publisher/spilogale-inc/

Amazon US (Kindle edition): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/

Amazon UK (Kindle edition): http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/

Clicking on Mr. Coen’s photo will take you to his website: http://pipcoen.com/

Interview: Brian Trent on “Crash Site”

Brian TrentTell us a bit about “Crash-Site.”

“Crash-Site” is set on the planet Osiris, one of the first extra-solar worlds humanity settles in my fictional universe of stories. The fledgling colony soon learns that an ancient vessel may have crashed somewhere on their world, and that amid that wreckage a treasure trove of advanced technology is waiting to be discovered. The story is the quest for this crash-site, told from the perspectives of an array of characters caught up (sometimes willingly, sometimes unwillingly) in the chase.

Behind the scenes, “Crash-Site” is also a direct sequel to “A Thousand Deaths Through Flesh and Stone” (F&SF’s May/June 2017 issue). We see here what has become of Harris Alexander Pope, the reluctant hero from the Partisan War on Mars. Having retired to Osiris, Harris gets caught up in the search for the vessel, teaming up with another recurring character of mine: Umerah Javed of “An Incident on Ishtar.” In a way, “Crash-Site” is a sort of nexus in my “War Hero” universe of stories, bringing together multiple characters and events that have far-ranging ramifications for the development of Osiris. However, no familiarity with these other tales is necessary.

 

What was the inspiration for this story, or what prompted you to write it?

The story was built around the idea that a quest like this can mean wildly different things to different factions (and therefore to different possible directions for the future). There are cunning opportunists, grieving outcasts, self-serving exploiters, and those who are simply trying to increase survival odds. It represents a potential turning point for the colony’s future. It’s not simply about riches as in, say, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. The downed vessel comes from such an advanced culture that it can potentially catapult corporations or governments to planet-spanning dominance. Into whose hands should that fall? To other characters, it’s seen as a kind of magic cave, like in the tale of Ali Baba, or even a magic lamp that might grant wishes. To still others it’s the odyssey of scientific discovery, or limitless resources on a resource-strained planet.

 

Can you tell us about any of the research you may have done for “Crash-Site?”

“Crash-Site” required steep, daily imagination exercises. That’s par for the course, but here I had lots of character heads to get into, lots of narrative shoes to walk in. Each day I’d tackle a different mosaic in the story’s construction: there’s Harris and Umerah, trying to track the grieving worldmapper who allegedly knows where the mysterious vessel is. There’s the story of that worldmapper himself, and why he’s out there in the fungal forests of Osiris. There’s a pair of corporate hunters hard on the trail. You don’t want to compose in terms of “heroes” and “villains” — because even the “villains” have their own motivations that are very real to them. Even Thanos in Avengers Infinity War doesn’t think of himself as a bad guy. At one point in “Crash-Site”, a character says to another, “I thought you people were good!” It’s up to the reader to decide that for themselves, particularly when the full cast of players is revealed. Getting into their heads is key to that.

I needed to think about what life in the Osirian colony would be like: this is a world with a single equatorial sea that creates a narrow habitable zone–prime real estate– while much of the planet is harsh hinterland. Osiris is a very unusual place by terrestrial standards. I spent a lot of time squinting at its blue supergiant sunrise, gazing at its ringed moon, thinking of the ocean and “walking” along the docks and seaside communities that developed there. This also involved a few day-trips to seaside communities here in my home state, visualizing them in frontier terms in which resources are thin. Frontier colonies are a fascinating study.

 

What was the most difficult aspect of writing this story, and what was the most fun?

“Crash-Site” was a true pleasure to write, partly because I’m fond of ensemble stories with multiple characters. I particularly enjoy constructing plots which have disparate narrative shards coalescing. The challenge is not just keeping everything straight, but in crafting a believable, fully realized world where the local details of environment and culture are consistent. The fun is in winding everything up and letting the chase unfold.

 Ten Thousand Thunders

What are you working on now?

I recently finished final edits on my novel Ten Thousand Thunders, which is due out from Flame Tree Press this October, so now I’m hard at work on the sequel. Incidentally, Ten Thousand Thunders is the origin story of the universe in which “Crash-Site” exists, taking place some seventy years or so before the events of this story take place. And I’m also working on an alternate history series I’m very excited about.

 

 

 

“Crash-Site” appears in the May/June 2018 issue of F&SF.

You can buy a copy of the issue here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/toc1805.htm

You can subscribe to the print edition of F&SF here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/subscribe.htm

You can subscribe to the electronic edition of F&SF at the following links:

Weightless Books (non-Kindle): https://weightlessbooks.com/category/publisher/spilogale-inc/

Amazon US (Kindle edition): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/

Amazon UK (Kindle edition): http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/

You can pre-order Ten Thousand Thunders by clicking on its cover image; clicking on Mr. Trent’s photo will take you to his website.

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