Buy F&SF • Read F&SF • Contact F&SF • Advertise In F&SF • Blog • Forum • RSS

Editor’s Note for July-August 2019

Summer is here (or Winter, for our readers in the southern hemisphere) and so is the July/August issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction!

Many of our electronic and paper subscribers have already received their issues, but if you’re looking for a copy you can find us in most Barnes & Noble stores, as well as many local independent booksellers. You can also order a single copy from our website or buy an electronic edition from Amazon, AmazonUK, and — now, available worldwide and in every electronic format — through Weightless Books.

Fantasy & Science Fiction, July/August, cover by Mondolithic StudiosMondolithic Studio‘s cover illustrates the inevitable robot apocalypse.

ROBOTS INVADE!

This month, humanity’s doom comes on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.

Cassandra Khaw, who first appeared as the co-author of “Shooting Iron” in our Sept/Oct issue last year, returns with a story set in London in the aftermath of the great robot war to remind us that “Mighty Are the Meek and the Myriad.”

And across the Atlantic, in the ruins of robot-ravaged New York, F&SF regular Alex Irvine relates “The Legend of Wolfgang Robotkiller.”

FANTASY, SCIENCE FICTION,
AND THE DIFFICULT TO CATEGORIZE

Our other science fiction for this issue includes the F&SF debut of Theodore McCombs, who takes us to a near future where computer-aided memory enhancement leads us to “Lacuna Heights.” Dominica Phetteplace returns with another story of the near future at the intersection of social media and private healthcare with “Nice for What.” And another debut author, Eliza Rose, takes us on a colony ship to deep space for a visit to “Planet Doykeit.”

What robot-filled summer issue would be complete without some dragons for balance? On the fantasy side, Deborah Coates gives us an intimate look at the dragon invasion of South Dakota and introduces us to some “Girls Who Never Stood a Chance.” G. V. Anderson takes us to Yorkshire for a gothic tale of haunting and asylums seen in “A Strange Uncertain Light.” And Albert E. Cowdrey returns with another story of William Warlock, a New Orleans lawyer with supernatural abilities and a client who receives “The Legacy.”

And some stories are just too hard to categorize but that’s part of what makes them so interesting. In this issue, we have “The Slave” by Andrej Kokoulin, translated from the Russian by Alex Shvartsman. In 2017, “The Slave” won the FantLab Award and immediately prompted a lengthy debate about whether or not the story is speculative. We’ll let you decide what you think. We also have “The Everlasting Humming of the Earth” by Molly Gloss, whose fiction constantly invites you to forget about categories and consider the human experience instead. 


You’ll also find two new poems slipped into pages between the stories. Mary Soon Lee has a message directed “To Skeptics” and Beth Cato makes her first appearance in F&SF with the assurance that “My Ghost Will Know the Way.”

OUR OTHER COLUMNS AND FEATURES

Looking for summer reading? Charles de Lint recommends some Books to Look For, by Sarah Pinsker, Kim Beall, John R. Little, Melissa F. Olson, and Philip K. Dick: A Comics Biography by Laurent Queyssi and Mauro Marchesi. Meanwhile, Michelle West is Musing on Books by Tim Maughan, Max Gladstone, K Chess, and Cate Glass. And for our monthly Curiosities column, rediscovering lost writers and books, David Langford reviews Charles Eric Maine’s The Mind of Mr Soames, a 1961 novel about science and the social contract.

In our latest film column, David J. Skal shares his delight in the new Mary Poppins movie. Jerry Oltion’s science column explains “How Vaccines Work.” And Paul Di Filippo has plucked another feather of the Plumage from Pegasus to tickle your fancy. The print version of the magazine also offers up new cartoons by Nick Downes and Arthur Masear.

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

We hope you’ll share your thoughts about the issue with us. We can be found on:

Happy reading!

C.C. Finlay, Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction
fandsf.com | @fandsf

Editor’s Note for May-June 2019

The May/June issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction is upon us! With ten stories, two poems, and all our regular columns and features, there’s plenty to entertain you for the next sixty days.

Most of our electronic and paper subscribers have already received their issues, but if you’re looking for a copy you can find us in most Barnes & Noble stores, as well as many local independent booksellers. You can also order a single copy from our website or buy an electronic edition from Amazon, AmazonUK, and — now, available worldwide and in every electronic format — through Weightless Books.

Fantasy & Science Fiction, May/June, cover by Cory and Catska EnchCory and Catska Ench’s‘s cover illustrates “New Atlantis” by Lavie Tidhar.

NEW ATLANTIS

“Generosity and enlightenment, dignity and splendour, piety and public spirit.” These are the qualities of the New Atlantis conceived by Sir Francis Bacon, the English philosopher, for his unfinished utopian novel (and aren’t all utopias, by their very nature, ultimately unfinished?), which was originally published in 1627, the year after his death. Now Lavie Tidhar brings us an ambitious new novella and a vision of the future that would have been impossible for Bacon to imagine when he was busy inventing the scientific method and dreaming of utopias four centuries ago. Tidhar is a winner of the British Science Fiction Award, the British Fantasy Award, the World Fantasy Award, and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award. “The Vanishing Kind,” his previous novella for F&SF, was reprinted in Year’s Best collections by Dozois and Horton.

AN ABUNDANCE OF GREAT FICTION

Our other science fiction for this issue begins with “The Abundance” by Andy Dudak, making his F&SF debut, which takes us to the far future and shows that solving humanity’s material needs will never solve all of humanity’s problems. Bruce McAllister returns to Earth and to the future of genetically engineered animals that he introduced several years ago in “DreamPet,” but this time he goes in a different direction with a piece of flash fiction that will have you holding your “Breath.” The critically acclaimed Debbie Urbanski makes her second appearance in the magazine with “How to Kiss a Hojacki,” a novelet about transformations and becoming the other. And Tobias S. Buckell appears for the first time in F&SF, offering up an “Apocalypse Considered Through a Helix of Semiprecious Foods and Recipes.”

This issue’s fantasy includes “Thirty-Three Wicked Daughters,” a fairy tale from the Newbery-winning author Kelly Barnhill in her F&SF debut. David Gullen, our fourth first-timer in this issue, introduces us to “The Moss Kings,” a piece of classic British fantasy about rule and resistance. Pip Coen returns to our pages with “Second Skin,” his deeply unsettling story about family and making a place for yourself. And Matthew Hughes revisits the world and adventures of Raffalon the thief, who turns out to have a nose for the future in “Sternutative Sortilege.”

Finally, we think many of you will remember “On Highway 18,” Rebecca Campbell’s haunting story about teenagers hitchhiking along the Pacific Coast. She returns with a new piece of postpartum horror in “The Fourth Trimester is the Strangest.”

You’ll also find two new poems slipped into the pages between the stories. Mary Soon Lee offers us a new way to consider “Guinevere” and Gretchen Tessmer takes us on a journey from “From Tierra Del Fuego to the Moluccas.”

OUR OTHER COLUMNS AND FEATURES

Charles de Lint recommends some Books to Look For, by P. Djélì Clark, Jeanne Gomoll, Alice and Lisa Hoffman, and Sylvain Neuvel, plus the new Rod Serling biography by Nicholas Parisi and a boxed set of chapbooks edited by Tom Hirons. Elizabeth Hand considers new Books by Gregory Norminton, Sarah Moss, and Scotto Moore, plus the second edition of Folk Horror Revival. And for our monthly Curiosities column, rediscovering lost writers and books, Paul Di Filippo turns to Atomsk (1949), one of the mainstream novels (with some genre interest) by Cordwainer Smith.

In our latest film column, Karin Lowachee provides a thoughtful analysis of the reasons why the Netflix blockbuster “Bird Box Never Takes Off.” Jerry Oltion’s science column explains “How to Calculate an Orbit.” Plus we bring you the results of F&SF Competition #97 with its “Watered Down” versions of books and films. And the print version of the magazine gives you new cartoons by Danny Shanahan, Arthur Masear, and S. Harris.

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

We hope you’ll share your thoughts about the issue with us. We can be found on:

Happy reading!

C.C. Finlay, Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction
fandsf.com | @fandsf

Editor’s Note for March-April 2019

It’s time for the changing of the seasons and the new issue of F&SF is full of transformations. The March/April issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction delivers 12 stories, 2 poems, and all our regular columns and features.

Most of our electronic and paper subscribers have already received their issues, but if you’re looking for a copy you can find us in most Barnes & Noble stores, as well as many local independent booksellers. You can also order a single copy from our website or buy an electronic edition from Amazon, AmazonUK, and — now, available worldwide and in every electronic format — through Weightless Books.

Fantasy & Science Fiction, March/April, cover by Kent BashKent Bash‘s cover illustrates “Contagion’s Eve at the House Noctambulous” by Rich Larson.

GET RICH

Over the past six years, Rich Larson has been one of the most prolific and consistently excellent writers in the genre. 2018 saw the publication of his collection Tomorrow Factory as well as his first novel Annex. A sequel, Cypher, will be coming out later this year. We’re happy to welcome him back into the pages of F&SF with this month’s cover story, which paints a picture of the future that has some uncomfortable roots in the present.

ALL OF YOU

R. S. Benedict is another new star of the genre. Her stories for F&SF over the past two years have included “My English Name,” her fiction debut, a story identity and otherness which was picked up for three Year’s Best collections and included in Gardner Dozois’s The Very Best of the Best: 30 Years of the Year’s Best Science Fiction, which was recently published. Her Summerian fantasy “Water God’s Dog” and her Philip K. Dickian time travel story “Morbier” have also been just as impressive to us.

She informs us that her new hard-to-classify novella “All of Me,” the longest story she’s written for us yet, was inspired by true events, ranging from the life of Rita Hayworth, born Margarita Cansino, an actress who underwent a grueling makeover to hide her ethnicity before she became a famous Hollywood sex symbol, to the history of Puerto Rico, where a U.S.-led eugenics campaign sterilized a third of the island’s women over the course of the 20th century without informing them that =la operación= could not be undone. (We’ll leave it to the reader to decide whether Matt Damon operates a clone farm.)

MORE GREAT FICTION

This issue’s fantasy includes “The Plot Against Fantucco’s Armor” by F&SF regular Matthew Hughes, another fun and fast-paced adventure featuring Baldemar, the unusually lucky wizard’s henchman. “The Mark of Cain” by John Kessel, another regular, is based on a fragment of writing he found in his files from the 1980s, so it’s a collaboration between his younger and older selves: he also admits that it contains the most offensive opening line and likely the most problematic character he has ever written. And newcomer Jerome Stueart makes his F&SF debut with “Postlude to the Afternoon of a Faun,” a story about music and love, history and healing. And Nick DiChario, who appeared just two issues ago with one of his Italian fairy tales, is back, this time with “Bella and the Blessed Stone,” which is a decidedly modern and very American fairy tale.

There’s also a generous serving of science fiction in this issue to go along with Rich Larson’s cover story. “The Unbearable Lightness of Bullets” by Gregor Hartmann returns to his loosely connected milieu of stories about humanity’s future in space spread across a thousand worlds divided along the Mainline and the Spur: here he returns to the remote Spur world of Zephyr and introduces us to Inspector Philippa Song who has to solve a murder before she ends up getting shot herself. S. Qiouyi Lu is a writer, editor, and translator making their first appearance in F&SF with “At Your Dream’s Edge,” a personal story about family and identity and the kind of desperate technological lengths one will go to when the two are in conflict. Tina Connolly returns to the magazine with “miscellaneous notes from the time an alien came to band camp disguised as my alto sax,” a piece of flash that isn’t much longer than the title and is as funny as you might expect if you’re familiar with Connolly’s work. Despite what you might think from the title, “The Free Orcs of Cascadia” by Margaret Killjoy is near future science fiction about heavy metal bands in the Pacific Northwest. And Paul Park has a story addressed to “Dear Sir or Madam,” written by a videographer who is approached by a client with a project that will utterly transform him.

We have poems by two of our regular poets, both with a science fiction turn: “In the Caverns of the Moon” by Mary Soon Lee will unfold a discovery that changes everything we think we know, and “Away” by Sophie M. White will introduce you to the crew of a starship that once blazed trails between the stars.

Finally, you’ll also find “Playscape,” a chilling story of quiet domestic horror, written by Diana Peterfreund, another author making her F&SF debut, one of four in this issue.

OUR OTHER COLUMNS AND FEATURES

As always, Charles de Lint recommends some Books to Look For, this time by Stephen King, Andrew Katz, Richard Kadrey, and Jimmy Cajoleas, plus The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition by Ursula K. Le Guin and Charles Vess and The Writer’s Map: An Atlas of Imaginary Lands by Huw Lewis-Jones. Michelle West is Musing on Books by Derek Künsken, Ben H. Winters, Elizabeth Bear, and Dale Bailey. And for our monthly Curiosities column, rediscovering lost writers and books, Graham Andrews reviews The Brontës Went to Woolworths by Rachel Ferguson (1931), about a peculiar haunting that happens to three sisters.

In our latest film column, David J. Skal stands on the edge of the latest Halloween reboot and stares into “The Yawning Abyss.” Jerry Oltion’s science column considers the possibility of alien contact and says “E.T. Shmee-T.” The print version of the magazine also offers up new cartoons by Nick Downes, Bill Long, Arthur Masear, and Danny Shanahan.

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

We hope you’ll share your thoughts about the issue with us. We can be found on:

Happy reading!

C.C. Finlay, Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction
fandsf.com | @fandsf

Editor’s Note for January-February 2019

A new issue for a new year. The January/February volume of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction begins 2019 with 11 new stories, plus all our regular columns and features.

Most of our electronic and paper subscribers have already received their issues, but if you’re looking for a copy you can find us in most Barnes & Noble stores, as well as many local independent booksellers. You can also order a single copy from our website or buy an electronic edition from Amazon, AmazonUK, and — now, available worldwide and in every electronic format — through Weightless Books.

Fantasy & Science Fiction, January/February, cover by Jill BaumanThis month’s cover illustrates “The City of Lost Desire” by Phyllis Eisenstein. The artwork is by the award-nominated artist Jill Bauman.

FULL CIRCLE

Alaric had been found on a hillside, a helpless newborn babe clothed only in blood. He was obviously a witch child, for a gory hand, raggedly severed just above the wrist, clutched his ankles in a deathlike grasp.

That’s a passage from “Born to Exile,” the story that introduced Alaric to F&SF readers back in August 1971.

Young Alaric, with his talent for teleportation, eventually became a reluctant thief and willing troubadour, who fell in love with a princess entangled in court intrigues that only his wit and supernatural abilities could help him survive. His original adventures in F&SF, published back in the 1970s, were those of a young man, with a young man’s passions and impulses. Much has happened to him over the years, and across many hundreds of pages since. Now he returns, much older and wiser, only to find himself caught up with another princess and a peril he cannot easily escape.

MORE GREAT FICTION

Once you leave “The City of Lost Desire,” you’ll find plenty of additional adventure. Carrie Vaugh takes us to “The Beautiful Shining Twilight,” a story about what happens after you return through the portal to another world. Andy Duncan regales us with “Joe Diabo’s Farewell,” a story about the Native Americans who built skyscrapers in New York in the early twentieth century, and the Native Americans who worked in the early film industry at the same time, and one moment when the two overlapped. Sean McMullen introduces us to “The Washer from the Ford,” about a man who can see what happens after an unexpected death. And Pip Coen shows us “The Fall from Griffin’s Peak,” a story about a hard life and aspirations for something better.

We also have a variety of science fiction stories to balance out the issue. Robert Reed will take us on a trip to “The Province of Saints,” where empathy has the power to connect people and also destroy them. Adam-Troy Castro remembers a “Survey” he took once in college, and looks for the sinister purpose it was hiding and that it may still hide. Leah Cypess’s new story is “Blue as Blood” and shows how we see the world affects how we fit into it. Marie Vibbert’s “Tactical Infantry Bot 37 Dreams of Trochees” in a story about the future of robots and war, survival and poetry. And Erin Cashier takes to a place “Fifteen Minutes from Now,” where doing wrong to serve right raises ethical questions that it leaves the reader to answer.

Tucked somewhere inside the issue, you’ll also find a wonderful piece of flash from Jenn Reese about “The Right Number of Cats,” a story of grief and healing. And in another installment of his Plumage from Pegasus column, Paul Di Filippo takes us for “A Walk on the Mild Side.”

OUR OTHER COLUMNS AND FEATURES

As always, Charles de Lint recommends some Books to Look For, this time by A. Lee Martinez, Seanan McGuire, and Lark Benobi, plus the graphic novel Calexit Vol. 1 by Matteo Pizzolo and Amancay Nahuelpan, and the new history of Astounding by Alec Nevala-Lee. Michelle West is Musing on Books by Stuart Turton, Rena Rossner, Andrew Katz, and Sherry Thomas. And for our monthly Curiosities column, rediscovering lost writers and books, Paul Di Filippo reviews Pink Furniture by A. E. Coppard(1930), a fantasy romp by an author who used to be a household name.

In our latest film column, E. G. Neil looks at superhero movies and how one in particular is “Venom, Us,” while Jerry Oltion’s science column explores what will happen “When Betelgeuse Blows.” The print version of the magazine also offers up a new cartoon by Arthur Masear.

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

We hope you’ll share your thoughts about the issue with us. We can be found on:

Enjoy!

C.C. Finlay, Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction
fandsf.com | @fandsf

Editor’s Note for November-December 2018

Welcome to the 70th year of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Our November/December 2018 issue carries on the tradition of excellence with eleven new stories and a poem, plus all our regular columns and features.

Most of our electronic and paper subscribers have already received their issues, but if you’re looking for a copy you can find us in most Barnes & Noble stores, as well as many local independent booksellers. You can also order a single copy from our website or buy an electronic edition from Amazon, AmazonUK, and — now, available worldwide and in every electronic format — through Weightless Books.

Fantasy & Science Fiction, November/December 2018, cover by Alan M. ClarkThis month’s cover illustrates “The Iconoclasma” by Hanuš Seiner. The artwork is by the award-winning artist Alan M. Clark.

THE ICONCLASMA

Our cover story this month is something special. The Czech Republic has a strong tradition of science fiction, including the writer Karel Čapek (1890-1938), who invented the word robot for his 1920 play “R.U.R.”, and Josef Nesvadba (1926-2005), who had several stories published in F&SF during the 1960s.

Hanuš Seiner and his translator Julie Novakova are two of the latest writers to continue this tradition. Seiner is a professor of applied physics at the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague. His fiction frequently mixes hard sf and space opera. American readers may be more familiar with the work of Novakova, an award-winning Czech novelist and translator, whose English language stories have been published in Asimov’s, Analog, and other magazines.

“The Iconoclasma” originally appeared in the April 2013 issue of the excellent Czech science fiction and fantasy magazine XB-1. We are excited to share it now with you.

MORE GREAT FICTION

“The Iconoclasma” isn’t the only piece of science fiction we have for this month. Sean McMullen offers “Extreme,” a near future adventure about a thrill seeker who gets more than he bargained for. Geoff Ryman returns to the magazine with “This Constant Narrowing,” a dark and harrowing story about intolerance set in another possible near future. Nina Kiriki Hoffman gives you a chance to read “Other People’s Dreams,” a story set in the far future where dreams are an art form. J. R. Dawson wants to take you to outer space, “When We Flew Together Through the Ice.” And Bo Balder continues to explore the evolution and interdependency of humans in their environments with her new story, “The Island and Its Boy.”

We also have some fantastic fantasy for you. Our lead story for the issue is “Thanksgiving” by Jeffrey Ford. How well do you really know the people you share your holidays with? Y. M. Pang makes her F&SF debut with “The Lady of Butterflies,” an adventure about memory and transformation. Abra Staffin-Wiebe wants to inform you about the “Overwintering Habits of the North American Mermaid.” Robert Reed offers up another tale in his Raven series, this one exploring “Every Color of Invisible.” And Nick DiChario has written an Italian fairy tale for you titled “The Baron and His Floating Daughter.”

Poet Ruth Berman also returns to our pages with “Escaping the Ogre.”

OUR OTHER COLUMNS AND FEATURES

Charles de Lint recommends some Books to Look For by Martha Wells, Charlaine Harris, Bryan Fields, and Jane Yolen, plus an anthology edited by Irene Gallo and a new Tolkien biography by Catherine McIlwaine. In his Books column, James Sallis offers indepth reviews of Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction, by Alec Nevala-Lee and Figures Unseen: Selected Stories by Steve Rasnic Tem. And for our monthly Curiosities column, rediscovering lost writers and books, David Langford explores The Supernatural in Modern English Fiction by Dorothy Scarborough (1917).

In his latest film column, David J. Skal reviews “How to Talk to Girls at Parties,” based on the short story by Neil Gaiman that appeared in F&SF. In our science column, Jerry Oltion offers up a selection of “Space Drives: Real and Imaginary.” We have the winners of Competition #96, “Crime Blotter.” And the print version of the magazine also offers up cartoons by Nick Downes and Danny Shanahan.

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

We hope you’ll share your thoughts about the issue with us. We can be found on:

Enjoy!

C.C. Finlay, Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction
fandsf.com | @fandsf

Next Page »

Copyright © 2006–2019 The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction • All Rights Reserved Worldwide
Powered by WordPress • Theme based on Whitespace theme by Brian Gardner
If you find any errors, typos or anything else worth mentioning, please send it to sitemaster@fandsf.com.

Designed by Rodger Turner and Hosted by:
SF Site spot art