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Interview: Joseph Bruchac on “An Indian Love Call”

Joseph BruchacTell us a bit about “An Indian Love Call.”

 “An Indian Love Call” is the second -– or maybe the third -– short story in a series I am writing about two contemporary Native American characters who are very unlike the stereotypes of our people that still keep turning up in film and fiction. They are neither noble savages nor murdering aboriginals. Nor are they vanishing. (Hmmm, that last word may find its way into my next story about these guys.)  I want to blow up –– real good –– preconceptions about Indians.

My narrator, Billy, is blessed (or cursed) to have my second character Arlin Sweetwater as his lifelong best friend.  Blessed, because no one is as loyal as Arlin and cursed because Arlin is, quite frankly, what you might call a sweetly innocent mad scientist. 

Both of these guys are very tuned in to the 21st-century and, in Billy’s case, just about every aspect of American popular culture you could imagine. Thus the title of this story and the one that appeared in F&SF before it: “The Next to the Last of the Mohegans.” 

Humor –– contrary to the popular image of native Americans as being stoic and humorless –– is a very big part of all our Native American cultures. But the funny stories we tell are meant to not just entertain but to teach. There is (and I hope readers will agree) a good dose of humor and irony in the story, as well as a good bit of cultural information, including indigenous language and traditional tales still present among my Mohegan cousins. 

 

What was the inspiration for this story, or what prompted you to write it?

My inspiration for the story was, quite frankly, the main characters themselves. They keep coming back to me and telling me there’s more to hear. 

I have to say, too,  that I have long been inspired by Native elders and friends of mine who were among the funniest folks I’ve ever met, even though they never became “famous.”

Comedians are some of my favorite people and comedy is one of the most brilliant ways of teaching that we are human beings are blessed with. Though I never met him, Jonathan Winters – – who was Native American – – was one of the heroes of my childhood. And Charlie Hill, who was Oneida and the first American Indian comedian to make it onto the national stage is another shining light I am proud to have met.  My old friend Vine Deloria Jr. (Lakota) devoted an entire chapter of his classic book CUSTER DIED FOR YOUR SINS to American Indian comedy. Whenever I met up with Vine and he started telling jokes, I always had to listen very carefully because often the point of those jokes was not just to make me laugh but to point out to me something I needed to pay attention to in my own life. 

Some—if not all— of our best contemporary native American writers are also deeply aware of the importance of humor. My old friend the brilliant and very serious Laguna Pueblo writer Leslie Silko has made great use of humor in some of her stories and poems. Trickster wisdom—as the Chippewa author Gerald Vizenor might put it. And how can I not mention another of my First Nations writer amigos Drew Hayden Taylor (Anishinabe) who titled a recent collection of his sci-fi stories TAKE ME TO YOUR CHIEF and has another book called ME FUNNY?

 

What was the most difficult aspect of writing “An Indian Love Call,” and what was the most fun?

What was the most difficult aspect about writing the story? Right now, is figuring out what was most difficult. Like a lot of the stories I write, it sort of told itself and I went along for the ride. I guess the hardest part was knowing when to stop and not to overdo it. I hope I managed that. 

One of the things about Native American humor is that more often than not we make fun of ourselves and not others – – it’s not a mean spirited sarcastic kind of humor. You often find yourself in the butt of the joke. But, I think I have to be very careful in what I was saying about this. Another of my dear friends, the Kiowa author of the classic novel HOUSE MADE OF DAWN, N. Scott Momaday put it to me this way: “Joseph, as your uncle, let me caution you! American Indian humor is a very serious thing.”

And, as to what was the most fun? Spending time with these two characters again. Some thing I intend to keep on doing.

 

Why do you write?

At some point, very early in my life, writing chose me. It isn’t just something I do. And it’s not something I do for money. It is in my heart and in my spirit and I hope to be worthy of that gift I’ve been given. 

On a very serious note, decades ago one of my dear friends Dewasentah, who was the clan mother of the Eel Clan of the Onondaga nation, presented me with a small eagle feather and a miniature lacrosse stick — both in an envelope with the name Ga-neh-goh-hi-yoh on it —when I was making my yearly visit to the Onondaga Nation School to teach classes in Creative writing and storytelling to the kids. “You’ve  been coming here so long,” she said “you need an Onondaga name.  It means The Good Mind and you should have that name because your writing is a gift from The Creator.”

I try, in whatever I write, to live up to that name — which is an awfully big task. 

 

Who do you consider to be your influences?

My influences are so many it would be hard to list them all.In terms of fantasy and science-fiction, I have been reading everything I can get my hands on ever since I was in fifth grade and my cousin Bobby told me he had something for me. He pointed up to the attic and when I went there I found the floor covered with hundreds and hundreds of those little 10, 15 and 25 cent scifi paperbacks that used to be published. It took me weeks to bring them all home in the basket of my bicycle. I still have some of them in my own attic. My first introduction to people such as Asimov, Bradbury, Van Vogt, Vance and a host of others. 

I should also add that a huge influence in terms of short story writing was one of my teachers at Syracuse University- the wonderful Grace Paley. 

And the idea of telling our own American Indian stories from a perspective that includes the incorporation of traditional stories and language? I have to give credit there to another one of my friends and teachers, who was actually on my PhD committee, the ground-breaking Nigerian novelist Chinua Achebe whose THINGS FALL APART is one of the classics of world literature. 

 

What are you working on now?

I always have at least three or four different writing projects underway at any given time. One is a novel in verse for middle grade readers that takes place on one of our New England reservations during the current coronavirus pandemic. Another is a biography of the famous Seneca orator Red Jacket. And yet another story about Arlin and Billy is in the planning stage.

Thinking of the current situation – – and who knows how far downstream this current is going to sweep us—one thing I am doing these days, along with my two sons James and Jesse,  are daily life streams at 1 PM Eastern standard time on our Ndakinna Education Center Facebook page. 

Normally, at this time of year, we’d be storytelling, performing, teaching the Abenaki language, having school field trips, teaching classes in outdoor education and doing martial arts instruction (all 3 of us are black belts in Brazilian jujitsu and a few other martial arts disciplines) at our Ndakinna center which is located on an 80 acre nature preserve in the Adirondack foothillls.  But now? Fuggidabowdit! 

Anyhow, every Monday and Wednesday at 1 pm you can see me doing storytelling, music, and maybe reading something from one of my books at our Ndakinna Education Center Facebook page. Check it out. 

 

“An Indian Love Call” appears in the May/June 2020 issue of F&SF.

You can buy a paper copy of the issue here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/toc2020-29.htm

You can buy an electronic copy of the issue here: https://weightlessbooks.com/format/the-magazine-of-fantasy-and-science-fiction-may-june-2020/

You can subscribe to the print edition of F&SF here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/subscribe.htm

You can subscribe to the electronic edition of F&SF at the following links:

Weightless Books (all formats): https://weightlessbooks.com/format/the-magazine-of-fantasy-and-science-fiction-6-issue-subscription/

Amazon US (Kindle edition):http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/

Amazon UK (Kindle edition):http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004ZFZ4O

Clicking on Mr. Bruchac’s picture (photo credit Eric Jenks) will take you to his website: http://josephbruchac.com/

Interview: Ray Nayler on “Eyes of the Forest”

Tell us a bit about “Eyes of the Forest.”

“Eyes of the Forest” is a story about human explorers trying to survive in the deadly, primeval forest of alien planet. One injured explorer is racing against time to save the life of another.

 

Ray naylerWhat was the inspiration for this story, or what prompted you to write it?

I set myself a challenge when writing “Eyes of the Forest.” I wanted to do a few things that were difficult to do in the same story:

First: I wanted to write a hard science fiction piece that has the pace and drive of the early planetary exploration adventure stories: one that starts in media res with a “ticking clock” plot – a race against death.

Second: I wanted to create a world with a completely alien but completely believable ecosystem.

Third (and maybe the hardest): I wanted to use the story to explore, and introduce to readers, a field of science I have been fascinated with and reading deeply in for years: biosemiotics. In short (and here’s I’m paraphrasing Soren Brier, the author of the book Cybersemiotics), biosemiotics seeks to understand how animals use specific types of signals and signs for survival as well as how human sign-use (semiosis) is both linked to and different from that of animals. The objective is to find the commonalities in sign-use across species, and in fact even down to cellular levels of exchange, to understand the phenomenon of communication in its totality.

“Eyes of the Forest” is an adventure story about communication and meaning. It is a story about how what matters is not the anthropocentric view. What matters is not what humans think, but rather what the eyes of the forest see. If the humans on this alien planet are going to survive, they need to get out of their own heads and see as the forest sees. And this forest – as is clear when you read the story – and I am trying hard to avoid any spoilers here – sees the world in a way that is completely different from ours.

The humans on the planet need to break out of their own way of seeing and see differently. The story is very much inspired by the book How Forests Think: Toward an Anthropology Beyond the Human by Eduardo Kohn, who explores this concept of perception deeply, and I am indebted to his book for the theoretical underpinnings of the story.

 

Can you tell us about any of the research you may have done for this story?

To create the ecosystem, I refreshed a lot of my knowledge of marine biology. The inhabitants of the forest are modeled, for the most part, on marine organisms. The marine world on Earth is the most fantastically alien environment imaginable: when I was serving in Vietnam as the Environment, Science, Technology, and Health Officer at the U.S. Consulate in Ho Chi Minh City, I did a good amount of scuba diving. I initiated a “Save the Dugong” campaign to raise awareness of the importance of marine environment preservation, and was involved with a biodiversity conservation program on the Con Dao Archipelago there in association with a great organization called Biodiversity PEEK (Photography Educating and Empowering Kids.) We did a night dive along some reefs there that I will always remember as one of the most intensely alien experiences of my life. You don’t have to go far to find a world beyond human comprehension.

The biosemiotics underpinning of the story largely come from, as I mentioned above, How Forests Think: Toward an Anthropology Beyond the Human by Eduardo Kohn. Another book which has been an enormous influence on me is Biosemiotics: An Examination into the Signs of Life and the Life of Signs, by Jesper Hoffmeyer. There are dozens of other books too, but I don’t want to turn this into a bibliography. Let’s just say I take research seriously. For me, research is a joy: it’s an excuse to really dig into a topic and explore it. It takes a lot of research to be able to communicate an idea clearly, but I love doing it. I’ve always loved it: even as a kid, I lived in the library stacks when I wasn’t out sailing my little boat around our local lake or riding my skateboard or snowboard.

 

What was the most difficult aspect of writing this story, and what was the most fun?

I think the most difficult part of the story really was the most fun: balancing my three goals and trying to create a story that respected all of them – the speed and fun of the story, the technical detail of the story’s invented ecosystem, and the story’s biosemiotics underpinnings. Of course worldbuilding is always really fun: I had a really good time coming up with all the strange creatures living in this ecosystem’s niches, and the ways they interact with one another and the human explorers. And the Given Names: it was fun to play with those. Again, no spoilers, though.

 

Who do you consider to be your influences?

In fiction and writing in general: Patricia Highsmith, Fritz Leiber, Ursula K. Le Guin, Dorothy B. Hughes, Theodore Sturgeon, W.G. Sebald, Eric Ambler. These really shift over time: those are who come to mind right now.

In science and philosophy: Kaja Silverman, Mary Wollstonecraft, Joseph Hoffmeyer, Donna Haraway, Gregory Bateson, Wendy Wheeler, Charles Sanders Peirce, Thomas Nagel, and Julia Kristeva immediately come to mind.

Kaja Silverman’s The Subject of Semiotics tore my mind apart and fundamentally changed my life. My professor at UCSC, Earl Jackson, Jr. is the person to whom I am most intellectually indebted, and I would not be writing science fiction without him. That’s a fact.

 

What are you working on now?

I have a daughter, Lydia, who just turned 1. I’m up at 5 in the morning to write every day so I can get the time in before she wakes up at 6 and we start our day together. I’m working on being the best dad to her I can be, and the best husband I can be, while maintaining something of my own identity and creativity. I think that’s plenty!

 

“Eyes of the Forest” appears in the May/June 2020 issue of F&SF.

You can buy a paper copy of the issue here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/toc2020-29.htm

You can buy an electronic copy of the issue here: https://weightlessbooks.com/format/the-magazine-of-fantasy-and-science-fiction-may-june-2020/

You can subscribe to the print edition of F&SF here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/subscribe.htm

You can subscribe to the electronic edition of F&SF at the following links:

Weightless Books (all formats): https://weightlessbooks.com/format/the-magazine-of-fantasy-and-science-fiction-6-issue-subscription/

Amazon US (Kindle edition):http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/

Amazon UK (Kindle edition):http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004ZFZ4O

Ray Nayler’s website: https://www.raynayler.net/

Interview: Tom Cool and Bruce Sterling on “Hornet and Butterfly”

Tell us a bit about “Hornet and Butterfly.”

BS: It’s a futuristic warning about a Chinese catastrophe, which we wrote just before the latest Chinese catastrophe.
TC:  It’s a traditional hypersexual love story about assassins who identify as insects.

 

What was the inspiration for this story, or what prompted you to write it?

TC: Bruce and I have been friends since the late 90s, when we both lived in Austin. After publishing a few SF novels back then, I concentrated on my computer science career, but I’m in the mood to get back in the game.
BS:  I was quite the fan of Tom’s highly unusual military SF, and I always wanted to write something like that, and now I have.

 

Can you tell us about any of the research you may have done for “Hornet and Butterfly?”

BS: We used a “mood board,” which is a technique used by designers.  We collected and pinned-up graphics for world-building imagery, such as AI, security surveillance, Xinjiang re-education centers, refugee camps, militarized islands.
TC: Face recognition, neural experimentation with monkeys.  Ocean-borne cities and post-disaster hardware. I’ve seen hundred-thousand-ton aircraft carriers take grey water right over the bow, so that’s how the Raft inverted.

 

Can you tell us anything about the writing process for this story?

BS. The images on the mood board coalesced into scenes and settings. We volleyed a few plot outlines back and forth, inventing characters. Then Tom wrote a first draft and we just had at it tooth and claw.
TC: I’ve collaborated before, but this was like swimming with the great whites. Bruce weighed in so heavily that every draft felt like a transmutation.
BS: It was interesting to see more and more unearthly material arise, stuff that neither he nor I could ever write alone.

 

Why do you write?

BS:  I write a lot of material that publishers never see.  Prose helps me assemble ideas that would otherwise just be me silently staring out the window.  I’m a writer beset with ideas.  I have thousands.
TC: When I was a boy, I thought novelists were cooler than astronauts. In these times, I thank God I have my craft to focus on and to maintain headway. It’s a hard thing for a cyberpunk to survive into the future of his imagination. My first novel was INFECTRESS, so help me.

 

Who do you consider to be your influences?
BS: Well, I read all the standard cool guys you would expect a cyberpunk to read, Ballard, Burroughs, Pynchon, Bester, Delany. I used to hang out at the thrones of Harlan Ellison and Brian Aldiss.
TC: Heinlein. Wells. Orwell. “Doc” Smith. Herbert. Ellison. Farmer. Vonnegut. Sterling. Gibson. Stephenson. Ex-genera, Patrick O’Brien and Cormac McCarthy. Two great examples of transcendence of genre.

 

What are you working on now?

BS: These days, I like writing Italian-influenzed “fantascienza,” meaning science fiction that I would write if I was Italian.  I’m not Italian, but that’s why it interests me — it’s like I’m collaborating with an entire European peninsula.
TC: This morning, I submitted to DIA for security review a final draft of TESTIMONY, a book of essays on the nature of time, an occult God, who killed JFK, sex as data, and 66 other things. TRANSGENIC, a satire involving dynamically transhuman MDs, is on the market. I’m about to start on Sun Queen, the third STAR ENVOYS novel written on spec, where our heroes are invoked inside a billion-year-old Dyson sphere, and ROBOT LAW, a noir thriller set post-Singularity.

 

“Hornet and Butterfly” appears in the May/June 2020 issue of F&SF.

You can buy a paper copy of the issue here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/toc2020-29.htm

You can buy an electronic copy of the issue here: https://weightlessbooks.com/format/the-magazine-of-fantasy-and-science-fiction-may-june-2020/

You can subscribe to the print edition of F&SF here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/subscribe.htm

You can subscribe to the electronic edition of F&SF at the following links:

Weightless Books (all formats): https://weightlessbooks.com/format/the-magazine-of-fantasy-and-science-fiction-6-issue-subscription/

Amazon US (Kindle edition):http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/

Amazon UK (Kindle edition):http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004ZFZ4O

Interview: Leah Cypess on “Stepsister”

Leah CypessTell us a bit about “Stepsister.”

Stepsister is a retelling of Cinderella, told in the form of a sequel to the story that happens about five years later. The main character is a close friend of the prince Cinderella met at the ball.

 

What was this inspiration for this story, or what prompted you to write it?

I’ve always loved fairy tale retellings — when I discovered my first book of “twisted fairy tales” as a teen, I thought it was the best idea ever and devoured that genre for a while. Ideas for fairy tale retellings come to me on a frequent basis. The original idea for this story was that it would be about a hard-bitten investigator looking into the events that led to Cinderella’s stepsister’s death. As you can see, the story ended up evolving a lot from that original idea…

 

What was the most difficult aspect of writing this story, and what was the most fun?

The most difficult aspect of it was figuring out what kind of story it was going to be. I was trying to think of ideas for middle grade retellings, and this clearly wasn’t going to work for that. Then I thought it might work as a YA book. Then I was talking to my friend Diana Peterfreund about it, and she said, “It sounds like a novella.” I immediately realized that she was right, and after that, writing the story was pretty easy! (It ended up being a novelette. Close enough.)

 

What are you working on now?

Believe it or not, I’m currently working on a middle grade retelling of the Cinderella story, told from the point of view of a stepsister! It’s a very different story from this one, although I’m discovering that they have some themes in common. I’m hoping it will be the second book in my series of middle grade fantasy retellings that I’m writing for Delacorte/Random House (kind of a dream contract for me). The first in the series, Thornwood, which is told from the point of view of Sleeping Beauty’s little sister, is scheduled to be published in Spring 2021.

 

“Stepsister” appears in the May/June 2020 issue of F&SF.

You can buy a paper copy of the issue here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/toc2020-29.htm

You can buy an electronic copy of the issue here: https://weightlessbooks.com/format/the-magazine-of-fantasy-and-science-fiction-may-june-2020/

You can subscribe to the print edition of F&SF here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/subscribe.htm

You can subscribe to the electronic edition of F&SF at the following links:

Weightless Books (all formats): https://weightlessbooks.com/format/the-magazine-of-fantasy-and-science-fiction-6-issue-subscription/

Amazon US (Kindle edition):http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/

Amazon UK (Kindle edition):http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004ZFZ4O

Click on the author’s photo to visit her website.

Interview: Amanda Hollander on “A Feast of Butterflies”

Tell us a bit about “A Feast of Butterflies.”

A constable assigned to a corrupt and backwater county learns he must solve the disappearance of five young men whose powerful families believe has something to do with a mountain girl who eats butterflies.

 

What was the inspiration for this story, or what prompted you to write it?

My friend and I were traveling in Bogotá together when we stopped in front of mural that depicted a young woman eating a butterfly. After staring for a few moments, I told my friend that I was going to write a story about it. The next day, my friend’s husband called from Minnesota to say that their house had burned down. We changed our plans, returning immediately to the States. A month later, after I went back to look at my photos from our very short trip and again saw the butterfly-eating woman.

What was she hiding? Who looks at a butterfly and decides to devour it? Then as the answers started coming, I realized I was seeing her from outside, so the next question was who was watching her. The answer became a bit complicated because everyone in her community watched her.

Communities are often incredibly cruel to anyone who refuses to bury the wrongs done to them. Again and again, communities punish victims of crimes, rather than the perpetrators. What do you do when the people who should lift you up decide to ostracize you? To throw you to the wolves for their own convenience of memory? Who is the one person who is willing to look a little more closely, with less bias at the person pushed to the fringes? Answering that led me to the constable. Beyond that pain comes a wonderful possibility: what happens when one person decides to subvert a corrupt system?

 

Was “A Feast of Butterflies” personal to you in any way?  If so, how?

Profoundly. My friends and I have had many conversations about trauma and justice over the years. What happens when you repeatedly see power so grossly abused in a way that can feel impossible to confront? When two alleged sexual predators hold lifetime spots in the highest court in the nation and another occupies the position of greatest political power? Political abuse and political corruption are old stories. Biblically old. We love fiction about justice, but in reality? To pursue justice as a society means to be willing to accept uncomfortable truths. Without that, we fail. And injustice? (I mean real injustice, not an angry fool who feels things are unfair when they must adhere to a social contract that respects individual autonomy and equity.) Injustice warps you. It seeps into your nightmares. It strangles you in your sleep and when you wake up, you realize with dawning horror that you did not dream. It physically changes you. How do you show that?

In a happier respect, the story also has a landscape influenced by spending time in the Shenandoah Mountains as a child. I grew up in a family of hikers. Summer weekends often involved traipsing on mountain paths. I vividly can picture the swallowtail butterflies there, and the river. I once nearly tread on a copperhead snake that was sunning itself on a rock. I remember other hikers yelling and jumping back, but I thought how amazing it was that the snake ignored me. It just wanted to warm itself. I especially remember the humidity, the way the air settled in my lungs.

 

Can you tell us anything about your writing process for this story?

I knew that I wanted to explore techniques from fabulist storytelling and fairy tales. They allow psychological distance but can enhance emotional intimacy because there are blanks you can fill in. They allow as much room for questions as answers. Also, the naming has such interesting possibilities. What happens when a character is known through their role in a community rather than by a personal name? Cinderella/Ashchenputtel is the ash girl or cinder girl because she is most defined by others for being filthy, which is a result of mistreatment. Snow White has pale skin, often seen a characteristic of those royal or aristocratic who do not labor outdoors but also operates as a mark of frailty and possibly impermanence. Little Red Riding Hood or Little Red Cap achieved renown through her outfit of a remarkable color (for any adherents of Darwinism there’s probably something very interesting to be observed about the color standing out perhaps too starkly in a dark wood). Or you have other characters defined by their professions: the Baker, the Prince, the Woodcutter, the Huntsman, or even more distant, the profession of their husband: the Baker’s Wife, the Fisherman’s Wife. The choice to avoid names and use titles that reflected how these characters are viewed by those around them rather than how they wish to be known. Which is what makes their secret lives so much more delightful. Like all of us, they are more than what the world sees.

 

Who do you consider to be your influences?

Elizabeth Peters, whose quote “Laughter is one of the two things that make life worthwhile” has been a guiding principle for both my life and my writing, even though that may not be obvious in this particular story.

Octavia Butler. My dog-eared, eighth grade copy of Kindred has moved into every home I’ve ever had.

Connie Willis, but especially To Say Nothing of the Dog, Uncharted Territory, and Bellwether, all of which I have re-read in a manner one might describe as obsessive.

Howard Ashman, whose work inspired me to start writing my own lyrics (and built my confidence in learning new vocabulary as, incidentally, he was the reason I became more comfortable with a dictionary thanks to his use of words like “expectorate” and “blather”)

And, in no order whatsoever: Dorothy Dunnett, Dorothy Sayers, Dorothy Parker (all the Dorothys!), Shakespeare, Oscar Wilde, Bizet, Howard Ashman, Mildred D. Taylor, Evelyn Sharp, Mark Campbell, Shel Silverstein (I maintain that “They’ve Put a Brassiere on the Camel” is one of the great classics of American poetry), Mel Brooks, Jean Webster, Gary Larson, Anna Julia Cooper (criminally under-read American intellectual; A Voice from the South should be mandatory reading), Stephen Schwartz, Mary Astell (A Serious Proposal to the Ladies has some of the sharpest satiric lines I’ve ever read), Langston Hughes, Howard Ashman, Isabel Allende, Jonathan Swift, Pablo Neruda, Stephen Sondheim, Oscar Hammerstein, Rosario Ferré, Irving Berlin, George & Ira Gershwin, Eva Ibbotson, Marc Chagall, Gwendolyn Brooks, Verdi, Gary Geld, Cole Porter, Arthur Sullivan, Charles Dickens, Samuel Richardson, John Donne, and last but never ever least, Dolly Parton.

Oh, and Howard Ashman.

 

Anything else you’d like to add?

Thank you to anyone who gave their time to read this story. It’s very near and dear to me.

 

“A Feast of Butterflies” appears in the March/April 2020 issue of F&SF.

You can buy a paper copy of the issue here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/toc2020-29.htm

You can buy an electronic copy of the issue here: https://weightlessbooks.com/authors/elizabeth-hand-authors/the-magazine-of-fantasy-and-science-fiction-march-april-2020/

You can subscribe to the print edition of F&SF here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/subscribe.htm

You can subscribe to the electronic edition of F&SF at the following links:

Weightless Books (all formats): https://weightlessbooks.com/format/the-magazine-of-fantasy-and-science-fiction-6-issue-subscription/

Amazon US (Kindle edition):http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/

Amazon UK (Kindle edition):http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004ZFZ4O

Mural by @veraprimavera

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