Buy F&SF • Read F&SF • Contact F&SF • Advertise In F&SF • Blog • Forum • RSS

A Galley of Covers for Richard Chwedyk’s Saur Stories

Over the past couple years, we’ve been doing an irregular series of #TBT (Throw Back Thursday) features here on the F&SF blog, where they can easily be found under the “F&SF History” tag. We also share them on the F&SF Twitter account and Facebook page.

For #TBT this week, here are the covers for all of Richard Chwedyk’s saur stories. You can order copies of back issues for most of these direct from the F&SF website here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/backish.htm

Fantasy & Science Fiction, Jan. 2001, cover by Bryn Barnard

“The Measure of All Things” (F&SF, Jan. 2001)
cover by Bryn Barnard

Fantasy & Science Fiction, Aug. 2002, cover by Thomas Canty

“Bronte’s Egg” (F&SF, Aug. 2002)
winner of the 2003 Nebula Award for Best Novella
cover by Thomas Canty for “Leda” by M. Rickert

Fantasy & Science Fiction, Oct. 2004, cover by Bryn Barnard

“In Tibor’s Cardboard Castle” (F&SF, Oct. 2004)
cover by Bryn Barnard

Fantasy & Science Fiction, Sept./Oct. 2010, cover by Bryn Barnard

“Orfy” (F&SF, Sept./Oct. 2010)
cover by Bryn Barnard

Fantasy & Science Fiction, March/April 2017, cover by Bryn Barnard

“The Man Who Put the Bomp” (F&SF, March/April 2017)
cover by Bryn Barnard

F&SF, January 1957

Over the past couple years, we’ve been doing an irregular series of #TBT (Throw Back Thursday) features here on the F&SF blog, where they can easily be found under the “F&SF History” tag. We also share them on the F&SF Twitter account and Facebook page.

* * *

Fantasy & Science Fiction, January 1957 art by Paul Blaisdell#TBT to the January 1957 F&SF and and this cover of “an alien spaceship” by Paul Blaisdell. Blaisdell is better known for the special effects he created for low-budget 1950s monster movies like “The Beast With A Million Eyes” and “It Conquered the World.” Over at Tor.com a few years ago, Vincent Di Fate did an interesting profile of Blaisdell’s life and work.

This issue opens with “Wilderness” by Zenna Henderson, the longest and most complex of The People stories to that date. “Rescue Mission” by Gordon Dickson is a humorous and twisty sf adventure story featuring alien creatures called the pid and illobar. “Operation Salamander” by Poul Anderson is the second of his Operation Chaos stories, about the Thaumaturgic Age that mixes science and magic.

The last original story in the issue is “The Wild Wood” by Mildred Clingerman, a classic and often reprinted Christmas story. About the story, F&SF editor Tony Boucher wrote that only Clingerman, “with her warmth and love and understanding, could have created such chill horror.”

The issue also includes a group of holiday-themed reprints, Ghosts for Christmas, by Sheridan Le Fanu, Arthur C. Clarke, and John Dickson Carr. The single poem in the issue is a sonnet written by James Blish in memoriam for sf writer Fletcher Pratt, who passed away in 1956.

Plus there’s this ad to remind us that the “cultural leaders of the nation” read science fiction. Those were better times.

Fantasy & Science Fiction, January 1957, interior ad

F&SF, October 1956

Over the past year or so, we’ve been doing a #TBT (Throw Back Thursday) feature on the F&SF blog, where they can easily be found under the “F&SF History” tag. We also share them on the F&SF Twitter account and Facebook page.

* * *

Fantasy & Science Fiction, October 1956 art by Kelly Freas#TBT to the October 1956 F&SF and this Kelly Freas cover for Heinlein’s The Door Into Summer.

The Door Into Summer was the second of five Heinlein novels that were serialized in F&SF in the 1950s and early 1960s. The others were The Star Beast (as Star Lummox), Have Spacesuit—Will Travel, Starship Troopers (as Starship Solider), and Glory Road. This issue contains the first of 3 parts of Heinlein’s novel, along with a couple of Freas interior illustrations.

The rest of the issue is a mix of stories. “I Don’t Know” is a moody flash piece, the first published story by fan-turned-pro Ron Smith. “Try This for Psis” by Robert Bloch is a humorous take on mind reading. “King’s Evil” by Avram Davidson mixes mesmerism and King George III. “Anything Box” by Zenna Henderson is one of the most enduring of her stories outside The People series, full of warmth and humanity. “Tea from Chirop Terra” by Winona McClintic is a wry, mildly amusing alien invasion story.

The issue also included two reprints: “The Monster Show” by Charles Beaumont, which first appeared in Playboy, and “Mr. Guthrie’s Cold War” by Jay Williams, which first appeared in The Woman’s Journal. John Christopher offers an essay on changes in sf magazines, editor Anthony Boucher contributes Recommended Reading, and Starr Nelson provides three “Sonnets in a Moonship.” Both the Christopher and Nelson pieces are also reprints, which F&SF used more often in the 50s.

The back cover (included below) continues F&SF‘s early efforts to persuade readers that genre fiction could be high quality literary fiction.

And finally, on page 117, F&SF congratulates “the world’s oldest science fiction club,” the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society, on their 1,000th meeting. The editor writes: “May you still be going strong when we put out (God willing) our thousandth issue, dated September 2033.” With the change first to 11 issues per year, and then to a bimonthly schedule, the date for F&SF‘s thousandth issue has been pushed back to Mar/Apr 2062, but we note that the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society, LASFS (http://www.lasfs.org/), is still meeting weekly and going strong. Salute!

Fantasy & Science Fiction, October 1956 back cover

F&SF, September 1982

Over the past year or so, we’ve been doing a #TBT (Throw Back Thursday) feature on the F&SF blog, where they can easily be found under the “F&SF History” tag. We also share them on the F&SF Twitter account and Facebook page.

* * *

Fantasy & Science Fiction, September 1982 art by Barclay Shaw#TBT to the September 1982 issue of F&SF and this Barclay Shaw cover for Scott Sanders’s “The Land Where Songtrees Grow.” Sanders, better known for his novels and environmental non-fiction, offers an exoplanet story with a swamp full of siren trees.

The rest of the issue includes John Kessel’s award-winning “Another Orphan” and a wide range of stories.

Next up is John Morressey’s “The Crystal of Caracodissa” is one of his earliest tales of Kedrigern the Wizard. Don’t try magic with a hangover. “Happy Birthday, Little Elroy,” by mystery author and screenwriter Barbara Owens is a story about the dark side of birthday wishes.

The longest story in the issue is “Another Orphan” by John Kessel, a novella equally in dialogue with 1980s yuppie values and Moby Dick. “Another Orphan” was a finalist for the 1983 Hugo and Locus Awards for Best Novella, and won the 1983 Nebula Award.

“The Memory of Wood” by Lisa Tuttle is a haunted and haunting story about a young couple and a wooden chest. Timothy Zahn’s “The Peaceful Man” offers entertaining military sf. “Everybody Goes to Mosserman’s” is Richard Mueller’s take on lycanthropy. Jane Yolen provides a mermaid tale with “The Undine.” Nancy Kress offers a carnival sideshow story in “A Little Matter of Timing.” The issue’s fiction closes with “The Wooing of Slowboat Sadie” by O. Niemand (aka George Alec Effinger), sf written in the style of O. Henry.

In this issue’s regular columns: Budrys reviews Delany, Simak, and Sargent; Searles seems surprised to be praising “The Road Warrior;” and Asimov explores chemical similarities.

The issue also includes Ed Ferman’s obituary for F&SF‘s longtime copyeditor Evan William Phillips, who passed away young and unexpectedly.

Finally, in F&SF‘s infrequent letter column, a reader worries over evidence that young people have stopped reading sf. The genre is doomed.

F&SF, September 1966

Over the past year or so, we’ve been doing a #TBT (Throw Back Thursday) feature on the F&SF blog, where they can easily be found under the “F&SF History” tag. We also share them on the F&SF Twitter account and Facebook page.

* * *

Fantasy & Science Fiction, September 1966 art by Jack Vaughn#TBT to the September 1966 F&SF and this Jack Vaughn cover for “The Productions of Time” by John Brunner.

The issue opens with “Luana” by Gilbert Thomas, a short, wry science fiction story that was reprinted in Judith Merrill’s SF 12 volume. But most of the issue is taken up by Part 2 of Brunner’s short, serialized novel “The Productions of Time,” which involves a play, a mystery, and time travel.

“Mr. Wilde’s Second Chance” by Joanna Russ begins “When Oscar Wilde died, his soul was found too sad for heaven and too happy for hell. A tattered spirit with the look of a debased imp led him through miles of limbo into a large, foggy room…” and it goes on from there. The story was included in Russ’s collection The Hidden Side of the Moon and appeared in a couple popular anthologies.

“Municipal Dump” by journalist Max Gunther was a humorous sf story, one of two he published along w a novel during a long nonfiction career.

This issue also saw the first publication of “Narrow Valley” by R. A. Lafferty, one of his most famous and often reprinted stories. It’s a tall tale about a Pawnee named Clarence who uses a form of topographical magic to protect his land from homesteaders. “Narrow Valley” is readable online via the Internet Archive and courtesy of Ellen Datlow’s reprint in Sci Fiction

The issue closes with “Troubling of the Water,” a story about The People by Zenna Henderson. It was later included in No Different Flesh.

There’s also a cartoon by Gahan Wilson, a book column by Judith Merrill, and Isaac Asimov’s science column. F&SF’s 1966 issues earned a 1967 Hugo nomination for Best Professional Magazine, but it withdrew due to a conflict of interest because F&SF’s Assistant Editor Ted White was chair of Worldcon that year.

« Previous PageNext Page »

Copyright © 2006–2018 The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction • All Rights Reserved Worldwide
Powered by WordPress • Theme based on Whitespace theme by Brian Gardner
If you find any errors, typos or anything else worth mentioning, please send it to sitemaster@fandsf.com.

Designed by Rodger Turner and Hosted by:
SF Site spot art