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Editor’s Note for the November-December Issue

Cover, for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, November-December 2020, by David A. HardyDavid A. Hardy’s cover art illustrates “Skipping Stones in the Dark” by Amman Sabet, a generation ship story that follows an AI’s attempt to provide continuity and maintain social cohesion beyond its original crew. In all, this issue brings you ten new stories, three poems, and all our usual columns and features. Three writers make their first appearance in the magazine.

You can buy single copies of this issue:

* Paper copies directly from us: from our website
* Electronic copies from Weightless Books

And if you’d like to support the magazine and the work we do, please consider subscribing.

* Paper subscriptions: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/subscribe.htm
* Kindle US: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/
* Kindle UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/
* Weightless Books, every format, worldwide: https://weightlessbooks.com/category/publisher/spilogale-inc/

THIS MONTH’S FICTION

“The Bahrain Underground Bazaar” by Nadia Afifi

Bahrain’s Central Bazaar comes to life at night. Lights dance above the narrow passageways, illuminating the stalls with their spices, sacks of lentils, ornate carpets, and trinkets. Other stalls hawk more modern fare, NeuroLync implants and legally ambiguous drones. The scent of cumin and charred meat fills my nostrils. My stomach twists in response. Chemo hasn’t been kind to me.
 

“La Regina Ratto” by Nick DiChario

Giuseppe spent the first night in his new apartment trying to sleep through the scratching and scuttling noises of small creatures. When he rose the next morning, he saw three rats standing on their hind legs in his kitchen, gazing up at him like shiny-eyed children. “”
 

“How to Burn Down the Hinterlands” by Lyndsie Manusos

Begin with rage. Begin with the memory of your mother. Her smell, her sounds, her silhouette against the fire. Remember the way she was dragged from your home, taken because she had reached too high, her ambition deemed too great. Because she forged a weapon she shouldn’t have. Remember their promise: that the world would be saved. That this sacrifice was for the greater good. One woman versus the entire kingdom. Was that not an obvious choice? Remember snarling, spitting, and crying in the arms of bigger, lesser men.
 

“The Glooms” by Matthew Hughes

As Baldemar sculled the little skiff toward the jetty, he thought he saw a figure he recognized, though for the man to be present here in Golathreon was improbable. But the westering sun, down low on the waters of the Sundering Sea, made the gentle waves flash with gold, and all resolution was lost in the auric glare.
 

“A Tale of Two Witches” by Albert E. Cowdrey

After speaking with the sheriff, Rosie Merckel decided she’d better make a pit stop on the way out of his HQ.
     “Wouldn’t want to have to go in that house,” she muttered.
 

“A Civilized and Orderly Zombie Apocalypse Per School Regulations” by Sarina Dorie

For the last twenty years, my school district has been enforcing mandatory A.L.I.C.E. training drills in case we ever need to safely respond to an emergency, such as intruders, school shootings, or irate parents. I doubt our district ever imagined my sixth-grade class would need to use our training to respond to a zombie apocalypse.
 

“The Homestake Project” by Cylin Busby

Just after dawn, I drove my rental the three miles from the motel to the Homestake Mine. It was hard to miss, the rolled, dark earth that gave the Black Hills their name, churned and piled at the base of the mountains. I parked the Ford among all the other strictly American cars and made my way into the office.
 

“On Vapor, Which the Night Condenses” by Gregor Hartmann

The five-armed sea star looked like a toy. It was made of a soft, pliant material with no sharp edges, in happy eye-catching colors that would delight a child. Lying on a workbench, it begged to be touched. Philippa Song thought it was the most adorable murder weapon she’d ever encountered.
 

“The Silent Partner” by Theodore McCombs

He found something less than a mouse on Mrs. Fowler’s stone front porch as he climbed her stoop to ring the bell. Just the head, worked over by fine cat teeth, and a gristly tuft of throat and dusky belly. Some neighborhood feral was taking good care of the old woman, evidently. He lingered with one foot on the stoop, a little too interested. He bent carefully, wrapped the mouse head in a used tissue, and pocketed it. Then he knocked on the door.
 

“Skipping Stones in the Dark” by Amman Sabet

The Fold was my embarking name, but there’s nowhere else to set foot anymore. No other starships. So one imagines the pointlessness of a distinct name.
     Coursing the black, my humans give birth, grow old, and die within me. They mark distance using the voyage, mark time by how fast a ray of light completes it. The meter and the hour are things of the past, for Earth was left behind many generations ago. They only have each other now. And me.
 

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

We hope you’ll share your thoughts about the issue with us. We can be found on:

Enjoy!

C.C. Finlay, Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction
fandsf.com | @fandsf

THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION
November/December
72nd Year of Publication

NOVELETS

The Bahrain Underground Bazaar – Nadia Afifi
La Regina Ratto – Nick DiChario
How to Burn Down the Hinterlands – Lyndsie Manusos
The Glooms – Matthew Hughes
A Tale of Two Witches- Albert E. Cowdrey
A Civilized and Orderly Zombie Apocalypse Per School Regulations – Sarina Dorie

SHORT STORIES

The Homestake Project – Cylin Busby
On Vapor, Which the Night Condenses – Gregor Hartmann
The Silent Partner – Theodore McCombs
Skipping Stones in the Dark – Amman Sabet

POEMS

Least Weird Thing of All – Beth Cato
Mended – Mary Soon Lee
Space Isn’t Like in the Vids – Beth Cato

DEPARTMENTS

Books to Look For – Charles de Lint
Musing on Books – Michelle West
Films: Three Degrees of Shirley Jackson – David J. Skal
Science: Is Math Real? – Jerry Oltion
Competition #100
Coming Attractions
Index to Volumes 138 & 139
Curiosities – Paul Di Filippo

Cartoons: Mark Heath, Kendra Allenby, Bill Long
Cover: David A. Hardy for “Skipping Stones in the Dark”

Editor’s Note for the September-October Issue

Cover, for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, September-October 2020, by Bob EggletonBob Eggleton’s cover art illustrates “The Shadows of Alexandrium” by David Gerrold, a story that spans space and time on a visit to a library that is so much larger on the inside than it appears from without. In all, this issue brings you eleven new stories from some of our favorite writers and friends, spanning the full range of the genre from fairy tale to hard science fiction. Regular readers of the magazine and fans of sword and sorcery will be happy to see the return of the bard Gorlen Vizenfirthe and his traveling companion, the gargoyle Spar. And there’s a baseball story just in time for the end of this (very strange) season. The issue also includes two promising writers making their short fiction debuts. Plus we have poetry, columns on Books, Games, Science, and Television, some Plumage from Pegasus, and, if you buy the paper copy, a few great cartoons.

You can buy single copies of this issue:

* Paper copies: from our website
* Electronic copies from Weightless Books

And if you’d like to support the magazine and the work we do, please consider subscribing.

* Paper subscriptions: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/subscribe.htm
* Kindle US: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/
* Kindle UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/
* Weightless Books, every format, worldwide: https://weightlessbooks.com/category/publisher/spilogale-inc/

THIS MONTH’S FICTION

“Of Them All” by Leah Cypess – Other princesses are blessed at their christenings, or else they are cursed. But her fairy godmother had to be clever. Would she grow up to be more clever still? This month’s novella is a fairy tale adventure with some twists.

“The Shadows of Alexandrium” by David Gerrold – The Alexandrium sits perched on the event horizon of the largest black hole in the universe, but don’t call it a Library, at least not to the Proctor — it’s so much more than that. This month’s cover story is a meditation on creativity.

“My Name Was Tom” by Tim Powers – Sometimes an ocean liner is just an ocean liner, and sometimes it’s something much weirder. And who knows then where the journey will take you? Tim Powers returns to F&SF with a story worth waiting for.

“The Fairy Egg” by R.S. Benedict – Bridget sells eggs to make ends meet. But ever since Mike’s accident, the leghorn has laid nothing but fart eggs, little dark things with no yolks. Some people call them fairy eggs and under the right circumstances, a fairy egg can hatch a monster.

“Weeper” by Marc Laidlaw – The falling star screamed as it fell, brought down by greedy sky poachers. When the stone-handed bard Gorlen Vizenfirthe and his companions Plenth and the gargoyle Spar find it first, they’re faced with dangers and choices they never expected.

“Do AIs Dream of Perfect Games?” by Angie Peng – When a baseball fan steals a hitter’s favorite bat, it leads to a pitcher’s perfect game… and reveals deeper imperfections in her larger world. A delightful debut by a brand new writer.

“The Martian Water War: Notes Found in an Airlock” by Peter Gleick – Human habitation on Mars is threatened by conflicts over access to fresh water, and a teenager records the terrible costs. A glimpse of the coming conflicts we face on Earth, distilled by the stark circumstances of colonization on Mars. The first published story by one of our leading climate scientists.

“Little and Less” by Ashley Blooms – When society falls apart and she can’t save the people she loves, Laurel saves animals instead. But even the wilderness will not let her stay alone forever. A story that sits at the intersection of hope and horror.

“The Cry of Evening Birds” by James Sallis – A couple coping with a terrible tragedy faces a chance to start over. Or do they? A subtle and wrenching piece of flash fiction.

“The Dog and the Ferryman” by Brian Trent – Buster is a Good Dog, but he needs special help to find his way home again. But the world has changed so much, he may not have a home any more. This is a story that surprised and delighted us with its mix of myth and science fiction.

“This World Is Made for Monsters” by M. Rickert – When the spaceship landed, the whole town turned out to see it. M. Rickert brings her unique voice and vision to a story about the things we bring to the world, and the things it gives us in return.

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

We hope you’ll share your thoughts about the issue with us. We can be found on:

Enjoy!

C.C. Finlay, Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction
fandsf.com | @fandsf

THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION
September/October
71st Year of Publication

NOVELLAS

Of Them All – Leah Cypess

NOVELETS

The Shadows of Alexandrium – David Gerrold
My Name Was Tom – Tim Powers
The Fairy Egg – R.S. Benedict

SHORT STORIES

Weeper – Marc Laidlaw
Do AIs Dream of Perfect Games? – Angie Peng
The Martian Water War: Notes Found in an Airlock – Peter Gleick
Little and Less – Ashley Blooms
The Cry of Evening Birds – James Sallis
The Dog and the Ferryman – Brian Trent
This World Is Made for Monsters – M. Rickert

POEMS

The Writing of Science Fiction – Timons Esaias

DEPARTMENTS

Books to Look For – Charles de Lint
Games – Marc Laidlaw
Plumage from Pegasus: Keeping Up with the ISBNs – Paul Di Filippo
Television: The Devil in Devs – Karin Lowachee
Science: The Science of Printing – Jerry Oltion
Curiosities – Paul Di Filippo

Cartoons: Arthur Masear, Mark Heath, Nick Downes, Bill Long
Cover: Bob Eggleton for “The Shadows of Alexandrium”

Editor’s Note for the July/August Issue

An editor’s note for the July/August issue seems almost redundant because this includes one of my rare editorials, just the third since I took over the magazine. (There’s a link to it down in the Table of Contents below.) On the other hand, some things have changed so much since I wrote it just over two months ago that rereading it today feels almost like traveling in a time machine to the distant past.

So I’ll let that stand on its own and tell you about the rest of the new issue instead! Starting with where you can find it. Here in the U.S., many bookstores and newsstands are still closed, so if you can’t find us where you live, come find us where we live online.

If you’re not a subscriber and you’d like to subscribe right now, here are some links!

* Paper subscriptions here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/subscribe.htm
* Electronic subscriptions via Weightless Books anywhere in the world here: https://weightlessbooks.com/category/publisher/spilogale-inc/
* Electronic subscriptions for Kindle US: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/
* Electronic subsriptions for Kindle UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/

You can also buy single copies of this issue:

* Paper copies from our website
* Electronic copies, available worldwide and in every electronic format, from Weightless Books, starting July 1.

Fantasy & Science Fiction, July/August, cover by Alan M. Clark

ALL HAIL THE PIZZA KING
AND BLESS HIS REIGN ETERNAL

Alan M. Clark‘s disturbing cover art (because, let’s face it, who wants stanky demon feet treading on the stones where your pizza’s going to cook?) illustrates “All Hail the Pizza King and Bless His Reign Eternal,” a new novelet by David Erik Nelson.

Three years ago, in our July/August 2017 issue, David Erik Nelson also had the cover story, that time with his novella “There Was a Crooked Man, He Flipped a Crooked House,” which readers are still sending us messages to tell us how much they loved it. His other stories for us include “The Traveling Salesman Solution” and “Whatever Comes After Calcutta.” Like any good pizza place, this new story delivers.

MORE GREAT FICTION

Let’s talk about fantasy. M. Rickert is here to escort us to “Last Night at the Fair.” James Morrow shares one of his “Bible Stories for Adults, No. 37: The Jawbone.” John Kessel explores being haunted and finding balance with “Spirit Level.” And Stephanie Feldman leads us to an unusual portal at the end of “The Staircase.”

Or we can talk about science fiction. Bennet North returns to our pages after a long absence with her space elevator story, “A Bridge from Sea to Sky.” Madeleine Robins mixes Pygmalion with R.U.R. to present us with “‘Omunculus.” And Brian Trent takes us to Mars to introduce us to “The Monsters of Olympus Mons.”

But we’d really like to talk about four writers making their F&SF debuts. Rati Mehrotra shows us that even spaceships can have a sense of humor, or at least try to, with “Knock, Knock Said the Ship.” Ana Hurtado invites us to Venezuela with “Madre Nuestra, Que Estás en Maracaibo.” Mel Kassel brings us along to a family’s summer outing at the lake so we can see “Crawfather” for ourselves. And World Fantasy Award winner Natalia Theodoridou joins us with a story about climate change and “The Shape of Gifts.”

We also don’t want to forget Mary Soon Lee, who offers up a sparkling bit of poetry with “A Quartet of Alphabetic Bubbles.”

Plus we have all our usual columns and features, which you can find linked in the Table of Contents below.

Enjoy!

C.C. Finlay, Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction
fandsf.com | @fandsf

THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION
July/August
71st Year of Publication

NOVELETS

“Spirit Level” – John Kessel
“All Hail the Pizza King and Bless His Reign Eternal” – David Erik Nelson
“‘Omunculus” – Madeleine Robins
“The Monsters of Olympus Mons” – Brian Trent

SHORT STORIES

“Knock, Knock Said the Ship” – Rati Mehrotra
“Last Night at the Fair” – M. Rickert
“Bible Stories for Adults No. 37: The Jawbone” – James Morrow
“Madre Nuestra, Que Estás en Maracaibo” – Ana Hurtado
“A Bridge from Sea to Sky” – Bennett North
“Crawfather” – Mel Kassel
“The Staircase” – Stephanie Feldman
“The Shape of Gifts” – Natalia Theodoridou

POEMS

“A Quartet of Alphabetic Babbles” – Mary Soon Lee

DEPARTMENTS

Editorial by C.C. Finlay
Books to Look For by Charles de Lint
Musing on Books by Michelle West
Film: Darkness Visible by David J. Skal
Science: What the Heck is an Analemma by Jerry Oltion
Curiosities: The Contaminant by Leonard Reiffel (1978) by Thomas Kaufsek

Cartoons by Arthur Masear, Arthur Masear, Danny Shanahan, Kendra Allenby, Nick Downes, Nick Downes

Cover: By Alan M. Clark for “All Hail the Pizza King and Bless His Reign Eternal”

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

We hope you’ll share your thoughts about the issue with us. We can be found on:

Editor’s Note for May-June 2020

The May/June issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction will take you into the near future, the almost recent past and the further past, across the galaxy, into other worlds, and reveal new parts of the world we already live in.

This is the spot where we usually tell you that you can find copies of the new issue in Barnes & Noble stores and at many local independent booksellers, but, you know, global pandemic.

Bookstore and newsstand sales account for a quarter of more of the sales of our paper copies every issue. With storefronts shuttered to enforce social distancing, this means we’re taking a significant hit. More than ever we depend on our subscribers, whether it’s to the paper copy or one of our electronic editions. And so I want to take this opportunity to thank everyone who has a current subscription, a new subscription, or a recently renewed subscription to the magazine.

If you’re not a subscriber and you’d like to subscribe right now, here are some links!

* Paper subscriptions here: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/subscribe.htm
* Electronic subscriptions via Weightless Books anywhere in the world here: https://weightlessbooks.com/category/publisher/spilogale-inc/
* Electronic subscriptions for Kindle US: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/
* Electronic subsriptions for Kindle UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/

You can also buy single copies of this issue:

* Paper copies from our website
* Electronic copies, available worldwide and in every electronic format, from Weightless Books

Fantasy & Science Fiction, May/June, cover by Maurizio Manzieri

THE GREAT SHIP

Maurizio Manzieri‘s amazing cover art illustrates “Who Carries the World,” a new Great Ship story by Robert Reed.

For those of you familiar with the Great Ship already, it needs no introduction. For new readers, imagine a mysterious and derelict starship the size of a jovian planet wandering the empty reaches of space until humans discover it and set off on a galaxy-spanning voyage, filling the vessel’s vast caverns, oceans, and habitats of every kind with thousands of intelligent species. This is the premise that Robert Reed introduced with “The Remoras” in our May 1994 issue, and one that he has revisited in novels and stories ever since. A ship like that contains infinite stories. This is the latest.

MORE GREAT FICTION

Other science fiction in this issue includes “Hornet and Butterfly” by Tom Cool and Bruce Sterling, a story the authors describe as “what cyberpunk would look like if somebody had invented it in 2019 in Hong Kong.” Ray Nayler makes his F&SF debut with “Eyes of the Forest,” a fast-paced hard sf story about explorers on an alien planet. And Rich Larson returns to our pages with “Warm Math,” a clever variation on the Cold Equations dilemma.

This issue’s fantasy is anchored by another writer making their first appearance in the magazine. Holly Messinger’s novella “Byzantine” mixes history and fantasy and twisty political machinations with the Fall of Constantinople. Richard Bowes’s newest story for us, “In the Eyes of Jack Saul,” mixes history and fantasy from a different period of time — we’d tell you more, but we don’t want to spoil the surprises. Leah Cypess returns to our pages with “Stepsister,” a wonderful fairy tale inspired adventure. And M. Rickert goes to similar source material, but pushes it in a complete different direction to come up with “Another F*cken Fairy Tale.”

Some horror and humor round out the issue. Rebecca Zahabi (“It Never Snows in Snowtown,” F&SF Nov/Dec 2019) returns to our pages with another unsettling tale, “Birds Without Wings.” While Joseph Bruchac brings us “Indian Love Call,” another off-kilter adventure featuring Billy and Arlin, who previously appeared in “The Next to the Last of the Mohegans” (F&SF, Mar/Apr 2018).

Paul Di Filippo gives us a new Plumage from Pegasus column — “Faster, Publisher! Binge! Binge!” We also have poems by Mary Soon Lee and Jane Yolen. And the print edition also includes cartoons by Kendra Allenby, Bill Long, and Arthur Masear.

THIS MONTH’S COLUMNS

This month we introduce a new Games column by Marc Laidlaw, where he takes a look at “Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice” and “A Plague Tale: Innocence.” Charles de Lint suggests some Books to Look For by Andrew Vachss, Wren Handman, Faith Erin Hicks, BR Kingsolver, and Margo Lanagan and Kathleen Jennings. James Sallis reviews new collections from Sarah Pinsker, Susan Palwick, and Kameron Hurley. Karin Lowachee’s film column looks at some South Korean cinema, including “Parasite.” Jerry Oltion’s science column takes a look at the impact of satellite proliferation. We announce the winners of F&SF Competition #99. And our Curiosities column takes a look at Hackenfeller’s Ape by Brigid Brophy (1953).

Enjoy!

C.C. Finlay, Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction
fandsf.com | @fandsf

THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION
May/June
71st Year of Publication

NOVELLA

“Byzantine” – Holly Messinger

NOVELETS

“Stepsister” – Leah Cypess
“Birds Without Wings” – Rebecca Zahabi
“Who Carries the World” – Robert Reed

SHORT STORIES

“Hornet and Butterfly” – Tom Cool and Bruce Sterling
“Eyes of the Forest” – Ray Nayler
“Warm Math” – Rich Larson
“An Indian Love Call” – Joseph Bruchac
“In the Eyes of Jack Saul” – Richard Bowes
“Another F*cken Fairy Tale” – M. Rickert

POEMS

“Mab’s Wedding” – Jane Yolen
“First Contact” – Mary Soon Lee

DEPARTMENTS

Books to Look For by Charles de Lint
Books by James Sallis
Plumage from Pegasus: Faster, Publisher! Binge! Binge! by Paul Di Filippo
Games by Marc Laidlaw
Film: The Disease of Class Divisions by Karin Lowachee
Science: Starlink, Star Junk by Jerry Oltion
Results of F&SF Competition #99
Curiosities: Hackenfeller’s Ape by Brigid Brophy (1958) by Paul Di Filippo

Cartoons by Kendra Allenby, Kendra Allenby, Bill Long, Arthur Masea

Cover: By Maurizio Manzieri

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

We hope you’ll share your thoughts about the issue with us. We can be found on:

Editor’s Note for the November/December 2019 issue

The first thing we bought for this issue was the cover art by Bob Eggleton, a piece he titled “The Sky House.”
Fantasy & Science Fiction, November/December, cover by Bob Eggleton

From there, it was a matter of finding the right writer to pen a tale worthy of the illustration, and we turned to reader favorite (and ours, because we’re readers too) Charlotte Ashley, who’s most recent appearance in the magazine was another cover story, “The Satyr of Brandenburg,” back in our March/April 2018 issue. She turned in a tale that is as delightful as it is unexpected, and the perfect accompaniment to this castle in the sky.

The rest of the issue is a balance of fantasy, science fiction, and horror, with a couple stories that blur those boundaries or just make them altogether meaningless. The complete table of contents can be found below. Gregor Hartmann, Matthew Hughes, Michael Libling, James Morrow, M. Rickert, Benjamin Rosenbaum, Andy Stewart, and Marie Vibbert all return to the magazine, and we welcome Sam J. Miller and Rebecca Zahabi, who are making their F&SF debuts. Plus you’ll find a poem by Jane Yolen, columns by our usual assemblage of experts, and cartoons for the print edition.

Enjoy!

C.C. Finlay, Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction
fandsf.com | @fandsf

If you’re looking for a copy of this issue, you can find F&SF in most Barnes & Noble stores, as well as many local independent booksellers. You can also order a single copy from our website or buy an electronic edition from Amazon, AmazonUK, and — now, available worldwide and in every electronic format — through Weightless Books.

THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION
November/December
71st Year of Publication

NOVELETS

“How I Came to Write Fantasy” – Michael Libling
“The Joy in Wounding” – Charlotte Ashley
“A Geas of the Purple School” – Matthew Hughes
“Bird Thou Never Wert” – James Morrow
“The Vicious World of Birds” – Andy Stewart

SHORT STORIES

“Rejoice, My Brothers and Sisters” – Benjamin Rosenbaum
“Evergreen” – M. Rickert
“A Hand at the Service of Darkness” – Gregor Hartmann
“It Never Snows in Snowtown” – Rebecca Zahabi
“Knit Three, Save Four” – Marie Vibbert
“Shucked” – Sam J. Miller

POEMS

“Swing Between” – Jane Yolen

DEPARTMENTS

Books to Look For by Charles de Lint
Musing on Books by Michelle West
Television: Those Were the Days by David J. Skal
Science: Portable Power by Jerry Oltion
Curiosities: The Arrogant History of White Ben by Clemence Dane (1939)) by Paul Di Filippo

Cartoons by Nick Downes

Cover: “The Sky House” By Bob Eggleton

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

We hope you’ll share your thoughts about the issue with us. We can be found on:

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