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Editor’s Note for May/June 2017

New stories by Richard Bowes, Leah Cypess, Nina Kiriki Hoffman, Matthew Hughes and more!

The May/June issue of the magazine can be found in most Barnes & Noble stores, as well as many local independent booksellers. You can order a single copy from our website or buy an electronic edition from Amazon, AmazonUK, and — now, available worldwide and in every format — through Weightless Books.

Fantasy & Science Fiction, May/June 2017, cover by Maurizio ManzieriThis month’s cover is by Maurizio Manzieri, illustrating “The Prognosticant” by Matthew Hughes. To see more of his work, visit his website at http://www.manzieri.com/.

BALDEMAR LEVELS UP

In the March/April issue we published “Ten Half-Pennies,” in which Matthew Hughes introduced us to a new character in his Archonate universe — Baldemar, a young wizard’s henchman. Baldemar’s adventures continue in this issue with “The Prognosticant.” As you can probably tell by the cover image, his problems get much larger.

MORE GREAT FICTION

Along with the new Hughes story, we have a wide variety of great fantasy in this issue. Elgin Award winning poet Shannon Connor Winward makes her F&SF debut in this issue with a traditional fantasy, “Witch’s Hour.” Richard Bowes marks his twenty-fifth anniversary of F&SF stories with “Dirty Old Town,” a contemporary fantasy about growing up in Boston. And Leah Cypess offers us “Neko Brushes,” a story inspired by the Japanese folktale “The Boy Who Drew Cats.” And Zach Shephard, another writer making his first appearance in the magazine, brings us dense world-building and a complex character in his flash story, “The Woman With the Long, Black Hair.”

You’ll also find a wide variety of science fiction in this issue. Brian Trent, who first appeared in F&SF a year ago with “The Last of the Sharkspeakers,” returns to the magazine with “A Thousand Deaths Through Flesh and Stone,” a story about human identity in a post-human world. Kelly Jennings returns us to a more familiar — and more threatened — Earth with her F&SF debut, “A History of the Invasion Told in Five Dogs.” Gregor Hartmann returns to the planet Zephyr and his outer space adventure series with “What the Hands Know.” John Schoffstall makes his first appearance in the magazine with another fast-paced story that explores identity, “The First Day of Someone Else’s Life.” And Nina Kiriki Hoffman, who last appeared in our January/February issue with the charming fantasy story “Cinnamon and Vinegar,” returns to our pages with “Rings,” a darker space adventure that shows off her versatility and range.

And we’re also pleased to introduce you to the work of R. S. Benedict, a writer who makes her fiction debut in this issue with a compelling and hard-to-categorize story, “My English Name.”

OUR REGULAR COLUMNS AND FEATURES

Charles de Lint suggests Books to Look For by Justine Larbalestier (“Wow!”), Elizabeth Hand, and Joe R. Lansdale, as well as a graphic novel by Ben Aaronovitch, Andrew Cartmel, and Lee Sullivan, a new anthology edited by Jaym Gates and Monica L. Valentinelli, and the Bookburners series by Max Gladstone, Margaret Dunlap, Mur Lafferty, and Brian Frances Slattery. Elizabeth Hand recommends new books by Peter S. Beagle and Graeme Macrae Burnet, along with Literary Wonderlands, edited by Laura Miller. In our television column, David J. Skal considers “Western Histories” as interpreted by HBO’s “Westworld” series and season 2 of Amazon Prime’s “The Man in the High Castle.” And for our Curiosities column, Mark Esping explores the work of obscure writer/artist Annabell Krebs Culverwell, who published much of her work under the name of “Columba,” including her first novel The Moon is Inhabited (1961).

As we announced in January, the Science Column by Pat Murphy and Paul Doherty has returned to every issue. This month continues their exploration of robotics with driverless cars and other “Robots On The Road”.

Paul Di Filippo contributes a new Plumage from Pegasus column, “Happiness is a Worn Gunn.” (Yes, it is. Yes, it is.)

And we also publish the results of F&SF Competition #93, “True Names,” and announce a new competition with a chance to win some fabulous prizes, including subscriptions to F&SF.

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

We hope you’ll share your thoughts about the issue with us. We can be found on:

In the meantime… enjoy!

C.C. Finlay, Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction
fandsf.com | @fandsf

Editor’s Note for Nov/Dec 2016

The November/December issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction is now on sale. The magazine can be found in most Barnes & Noble stores, as well as many local independent booksellers. You can order a single copy from our website or buy an electronic edition from Amazon or AmazonUK.

For the first time, F&SF is now also available electronically in DRM-free format worldwide through Weightless Books!

Subscribe now to either our print or electronic editions, and you’ll never miss another issue. And if you subscribe or renew your print subscription right now, you can give one or more gift subscriptions as a discounted rate. It’s the perfect holiday gift for another reader in your life.

Fantasy & Science Fiction, Nov/Dec 2016, cover by Kristin KestThis month’s cover is by Kristin Kest, illustrating “The Cat Bell” by Esther Friesner. To see more of her work, visit her website at http://www.kestillustration.com/.

ESTHER FRIESNER RETURNS WITH “THE CAT BELL”

Esther Friesner has published a couple dozen stories in F&SF over the years, but nothing since “Rutger and Baby Do Jotenheim” appeared in our Sept/Oct 2011 issue. She informs us that her new story was inspired by a visit to Gillette Castle in Connecticut, former home of William Gillette, an actor, playwright, and inventor, whose career spanned late nineteenth-century theater through the era of radio. He is most famous for bringing Sherlock Holmes to stage, and created the phrase, “Elementary, my dear fellow.” He was also an avid cat-lover. Gillette Castle still displays the bell he used to summon his cats. Our author used it to summon this delightful story for you.

MORE GREAT FICTION

Other fantasy in this issue includes “The Vindicator,” the final novelet in the Raffalon series by Matthew Hughes — but don’t worry, we’ll be starting a new series in the Archonate universe sometime early next year. And famed writer and editor Gardner Dozois returns to these pages to take us on a trip to “A Place of Bones.” Charlotte Ashley, who debuted in F&SF with her faerie duelists story “La Héron” (March/April 2015), returns with “A Fine Balance,” another story about dueling and politics.

For science fiction, we bring you “The Farmboy,” by Albert E. Cowdrey — even in outer space, survival can depend on some very practical and down-to-earth skills. Robert Reed gives us “Passelande,” a standalone sequel to his critically acclaimed novella “Dead Man’s Run” (Nov/Dec 2010).

And, because F&SF includes more than just fantasy and science fiction, Kurt Fawver offers us a library-themed horror story in “Special Collections.”

Three more writers make their F&SF debut in this issue. Lilliam Rivera appears with a story about a character caught between worlds in “Between Going and Staying.” Minsoo Kang brings us a philosophical science fiction mystery with “Lord Elgin at the Acropolis.” And James Beamon takes us to the crossroads to meet “The Rhythm Man.”

As a special treat for the holidays, Sandra McDonald has written a story that wishes “Merry Christmas From All of Us to All of You.” Plus we have our regular columns and features.

OH YES, THE COLUMNS AND FEATURES

Charles de Lint reviews new books by Stephen King, A. Lee Martinez, and others, including a new compilation of Gahan Wilson’s work from F&SF. Chris Moriarty takes a deep dive into books by Kim Stanley Robinson, Neil Stephenson, and Andy Weir. In our film column David J. Skal looks at “High-Rise,” based on the J. G. Ballard novel. We announce the winners in F&SF Competition #92. And for our Curiosities column, in this election season, Graham Andrews considers a political novel, The Morlocks (1924), by James C. Welsh, M.P. Plus we’re giving you a holiday’s stocking worth of cartoons by Arthur Masear, Bill Long, Nick Downes, and S. Harris.

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

After you read the issue, or even part of it, we hope you’ll share your thoughts with us. We can be found on:

In the meantime… enjoy!

C.C. Finlay, Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction
fandsf.com | @fandsf

Editor’s Note for Sept/Oct 2016

The September/October issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction is now on sale! The magazine can be found in most Barnes & Noble stores, as well as many local independent booksellers. You can order a single copy from our website or buy an electronic edition from Amazon or AmazonUK. Or just subscribe now and never miss another issue.

Not sure if you want to subscribe? For a very limited time, Amazon is offering a $5/£5 annual Kindle subscription to residents of the US and UK. That’s just $5/£5 for six issues, more than 450,000 words of fiction, plus columns, cartoons, and more. Check it out: Amazon US | AmazonUK.

Fantasy & Science Fiction, Sept/Oct 2016, cover by David A. HardyThis is the 727th issue of Fantasy & Science Fiction and the 67th anniversary issue of the magazine, which debuted in October 1949. And we think it’s special. David A. Hardy created this cover for the David Gerrold Special Issue. To see more of his work, visit his website at http://www.astroart.org/.

YES, THAT’S RIGHT,
A DAVID GERROLD SPECIAL ISSUE

David Gerrold hasn’t just had one remarkable career in science fiction, he’s had four or five. His first professional sale was “The Trouble with Tribbles” to Star Trek: The Original Series, which also won him his very first Hugo nomination. He went on to write other episodes for that series, plus the Animated Series, as well as novel tie-ins (including Encounter at Farpoint) and three non-fiction books about the show. His other television work included writing for Tales from the Darkside, The Twilight Zone, Babylon 5, Sliders, and Land of the Lost, where he created the Sleestaks.

At the same time, he was building a career as a classic science fiction writer of ideas, whose early novels included The Man Who Folded Himself and When HARLIE Was One (1972), another Hugo and Nebula finalist, and one of the first works anywhere to describe the idea of a computer virus.

He followed that up with a career writing science fiction adventure series, including both The War Against The Chtorr and Star Wolf books among others.

And throughout the decades, Gerrold was writing short fiction, which, in the early 1990s, took a personal turn that elevated his work to a whole new level. When “The Martian Child,” a story about a single gay father raising a young boy who believes he’s an alien, was published in F&SF in 1994, it won the Hugo, Nebula, Locus, and HOMer Awards, and later was made into a feature motion picture. It was the first of many much more personal stories that have redefined his career again over the past twenty years.

Gerrold has also long been both a behind-the-scenes and vocal advocate for more LGBTQ representation in science fiction, particularly in the Star Trek universe, a goal that was finally realized this summer with the release of Star Trek Beyond.

Few writers with this kind of range are this prolific. Few writers as prolific as David Gerrold have his kind of range. That’s why we are proud to present this David Gerrold Special Issue, our first special author issue in almost a decade. It includes two very different new novellas — “The Further Adventures of Mr. Costello” and “The Dunsmuir Horror” — plus an appreciation essay by former F&SF editor Kristine Kathryn Rusch and a brief autobiography by Gerrold titled “My Life in Science Fiction.”

MORE GREAT FICTION

But this is a double-sized issue so it includes a double-sized amount of great stories, starting with “Talking to Dead People,” a moving new story about murder, loss, and artificial intelligence by Nebula and Sturgeon award-winning author Sarah Pinsker. Lisa Mason explores the future of interactive television in “Anything for You.” And we bring you an alternate history novelet by Geoff Ryman; “Those Shadows Laugh” revisits the premise of Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s novel Herland, and considers how it might look in the modern world.

On the fantasy side, we offer “The Green-Eyed Boy” by Peter S. Beagle, a new tale about a very familiar wizard set in the world of The Last Unicorn. We also offer “The Sweet Warm Earth” by Steven Popkes, a more contemporary fantasy set in the world of horse racing and gangsters.

Three other writers make their F&SF debut in this issue. Desirina Boskovich gives us a horror-tinged science fiction story, “The Voice in the Cornfield, the Word Made Flesh.” Ian Creasey invokes the spirits of Boswell and Johnson in a historical ghost story, “A Melancholy Apparition.” And Leah Cypess takes a hard look at how science might help solve — or not — the problems of marriage in “Cupid’s Compass.”

We also have a new poem, “The Dragon” by Aimee Ogden, who is making her first appearance in F&SF, plus all the regular columns and features.

OH YES, THE COLUMNS AND FEATURES

Charles de Lint reviews new books by Seanan McGuire, Michael L. Peters, and others. Michelle West reviews books by Lawrence M. Schoen, Patricia A. Mckillop, and Joe Hill. In the film column, Kathi Maio highly recommends the new science fiction film “The Lobster.” And for our Curiosities column, Robert Eldridge considers The Adventures of Hatim Tai a Persian novel first translated into English in 1830. Plus cartoons by Arthur Masear, Danny Shanahan, and S. Harris.

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

After you read the issue, or even part of it, we hope you’ll share your thoughts with us. We can be found on:

In the meantime… enjoy!

C.C. Finlay, Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction
fandsf.com | @fandsf

Editor’s Note for July/Aug 2016

The July/August issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction is now on sale! You can order a single copy from our website or buy an electronic edition from Amazon or AmazonUK. Or just subscribe now and never miss another issue!

This is the 726th issue of Fantasy & Science Fiction.

Fantasy & Science Fiction, July/Aug 2016, cover by Mondolithic StudiosMondolithic Studios, the team of Kenn Brown and Chris Wren, provided this month’s cover, which illustrates Gregor Hartmann’s story “Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful.” To see more work by this talented pair, visit their website at mondolithic.com.

“TRUSTWORTHY, LOYAL, HELPFUL”
BY GREGOR HARTMANN

Gregor Hartmann’s last cover story for F&SF appeared in our August 1991 issue for his fantasy tale, “Henry in the Trees.” After that one appeared, he took a short — well, for some, two decades is short — hiatus from writing to pursue his career as a translator of scientific patents. That knowledge and expertise shines in this new story, which is about both unexpected discoveries and unintended consequences.

MORE GREAT FICTION

This issue includes another anniversary story: 45 years ago, in our August 1971 issue, F&SF published “Born to Exile,” the first professional story with Phyllis Eisenstein’s solo byline. The story introduced Alaric the Minstrel, who has since appeared in two novels and numerous stories, many of them in these pages, making this the longest running series by a single author in F&SF’s history. Eisenstein’s new Alaric adventure includes fresh revelations about his world and character that shows there are still new twists for this familiar figure.

Other writers returning to our pages in this issue include Oliver Buckram, with “An Open Letter to the Person Who Took My Smoothie from the Break Room Fridge,” a story that shows how true evil arises from petty impulses as much as grand plans; Bruce McAllister, with “Killer,” a short piece that revisits his world where angels have appeared in Central Park; and David Prill, whose “Vishnu Summer” will evoke the smell of cut grass and the sound of county fair calliopes as it takes you on an unexpected journey.

We also introduce several new writers to the pages of F&SF. It includes a couple fantasy stories: Dominica Phetteplace makes her first appearance with “Spells Are Easy If You Have the Right Psychic Energy” and Betsy Philips joins us with her semi-autobiographical tale, “Jesus Has Forgiven Me, Why Can’t You?” K. B. Rylander brings us a science fiction story, “Last One Out” — there’s more on that below. And this month’s novella is an alternate history, “The Vanishing Kind,” by World Fantasy Award winner Lavie Tidhar. A Man Lies Dreaming, Tidhar’s noir novel about Nazis and British fascists, was published in the US in March to wide critical and popular acclaim. He tells us that the idea for “The Vanishing Kind” came to him shortly after he finished writing that novel. Both stories make their way like spies through the sordid, shadowed streets of a London that might have been.

Along with the fiction we have “Martian Garden,” a poem by John Philip Johnson, and “The London-Ehrenreich School of Applied Textual Fortitude,” a new Plumage From Pegasus piece by Paul Di Filippo. This issue closes with “The Thing on the Shelf,” a novelet by reader favorite David Gerrold. Be sure to read the Coming Attractions at the end of that story for an important announcement.

READ “LAST ONE OUT” FOR FREE

We promised you more. Every issue features one story that we also offer for download online, via our free electronic digest for Kindle. (The UK version is available here.) This month’s free story — which you can also find in the print edition — is “Last One Out” by K. B. Rylander. The Last Man On Earth is a classic science fiction trope given a fresh twist in K. B. Rylander’s first story in print.

Even if you don’t subscribe to the magazine – and why don’t you? – you can click on this link and read Rylander’s story and all the columns in the issue for free.

OH YES, THE COLUMNS AND FEATURES

Charles de Lint reviews new books by Patricia McKillip, Carolyne Larrington, Lev Grossman, Diana Pavlac Glyer, and Melissa F. Olson. James Sallis considers new short story collections by James Morrow, Mary Rickert, and Jeffrey Ford. Kathi Maio offers insights into three films, “10 Cloverfield Lane,” “Eye in the Sky,” and “Zootopia.” In our science column, Pat Murphy and Paul Doherty look at “Our Super Cool Solar System.” And for our Curiosities column, Robert Eldridge presents Star of the Unborn (1945) by Franz Werfel, the German exile’s posthumous science fiction novel.

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

After you read the issue, or even part of it, we hope you’ll share your thoughts with us. We can be found on:

In the meantime… enjoy!

C.C. Finlay, Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction
fandsf.com | @fandsf

Editor’s Note for May/June 2016

The May/June issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction is now on sale! You can order a single copy from our website or buy an electronic edition from Amazon or AmazonUK. Or just subscribe now and never miss another issue!

This is the 725th issue of Fantasy & Science Fiction.

Fantasy & Science Fiction, May/June 2016, cover by Max BertoliniMax Bertolini’s cover illustrates “The Stone War” by Ted Kosmatka. Bertolini is a multi-talented artist who did the chocolate bunny cover for our September 2005 issue that featured Kelly Link’s “Magic For Beginners.” His first cover for us illustrated our June 2004 issue, twelve years ago, and this issue marks his 12th cover for the magazine. Bertolini lives in Italy, but his work has appeared in comics and on covers of books and magazines around the world. You can find out more and see examples of his work at maxbertolini.com.

“THE STONE WAR” BY TED KOSMATKA

For the past few years, Ted Kosmatka has been busy writing video games and working on novels. His quantum physics driven thriller, The Flicker Men, was published last year to wide acclaim. With this new novelet for F&SF, Kosmatka shows his versatility, using the fantasy setting to explore some big thematic issues. It’s unlike anything we’ve read in quite some time.

MORE GREAT FICTION

This issue contains several other fantasy stories. Canadian author Charlotte Ashley debuted in F&SF last year with “La Héron,” a Dumas-inspired tale about dueling and broken vows that is currently a finalist for the Prix Aurora award. Ashley returns this month with “More Heat Than Light,” a new adventure set in a parallel world where the French Revolution comes to Quebec and revolutionaries take up arms against the English in the monster-ridden wilderness. In “Steamboat Gothic,” Albert E. Cowdrey returns to the fictional suburbs of St. Genevieve Parish, Louisana, previously visited with “The Private Eye” in our August 2009 issue. And “Ash” by Susan Palwick is a look at tiny houses, and the things we make room for in our lives and why.

Our science fiction this month includes “Last of the Sharkspeakers,” a novelet by Brian Trent that we can’t say too much about without spoiling some of the surprises. “The Nostalgia Calculator” by Rich Larson is wry science fiction satire by one of the field’s most energetic new young talents. “The Great Silence” was written by Ted Chiang for a video installation by artists Allora & Calzadilla at Philadelphia’s Fabric Workshop and Museum. We’re reprinting the text here for our readers who haven’t had the chance to read it. “Caribou: Documentary Fragments” by Joseph Tomaras is a look at biological behavioral controls – how they might work and how they might go wrong.

On the horror side, we offer “The Secret Mirror of Moriyama House” by Yukimi Ogawa, a multi-lingual writer living in Toyko who has published a small handful of outstanding stories over the past few years. This is her first appearance in F&SF.

This month’s novella, “Coyote Song” by Pat MacEwen, brings you a story at the intersection of horror, fantasy, science, and police procedurals. Regular readers of the magazine know Pat MacEwen for her fiction, most recently “The Lightness of the Movement” (March/April, 2014), which was a Tiptree Award finalist, but her work outside these pages is just as interesting. It includes a decade as a Crime Scene Investigator, war crimes investigations for the International Criminal Tribunal, and her current position as a consultant on archaeological matters involving human remains. Her new novella combines forensics with three traditions of magic – Cambodian, Native American, and Voudoun. We think it will surprise you.

READ “THE LONG FALL UP” FOR FREE

Every issue features one story that we also offer for download online, via our free electronic digest for Kindle. (The UK version is available here.) This month’s free story — which you can also find in the print edition — is “The Long Fall Up” by William Ledbetter.

“The Long Fall Up” is a classic science fiction story that explores how humanity will bring forth new generations in microgravity? And what happens when the people who control access to gravity control reproductive rights? William Ledbetter has worked for almost thirty years in the aerospace industry, where he has designed aircraft components, and helped design rockets and parts of the International Space Station. Now he turns that expertise to fiction, and brings us a story about the ways people adapt technology to choose their own destinies.

Even if you don’t subscribe to the magazine – and why don’t you? – you can click on this link and read Ledbetter’s story and all the columns in the issue for free.

OH YES, THE COLUMNS

Charles de Lint reviews the Bookburners serials by Max Gladstone, Margaret Dunlap, Mur Lafferty, and Brian Francis Slattery, Nebula Awards Showcase 2015, edited by Greg Bear, the Never Never trilogy by Colleen Hoover and Tarryn Fisher, a pair of genre-themed art books by Design Studio Press, and Here’s To My Sweet Satan by George Case. Elizabeth Hand reviews Interior Darkness: Selected Stories by Peter Straub, Good Girls by Glen Hirshberg, and The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor LaValle. David J. Skal reviews the first season of Amazon’s television series “The Man In The High Castle” based on the novel by Philip K. Dick. We share the winners from our F&SF Competition #91. And for our Curiosities column, Paul Di Filippo reads Twilight Stories by Rhonda Broughton, an 1872 collection of fantastic stories by one of the forgotten early masters of the genre.

LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

After you read the issue, or even part of it, we hope you’ll share your thoughts with us. We can be found on:

In the meantime… enjoy!

C.C. Finlay
Editor
Fantasy & Science Fiction

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