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Solar System News

(237 posts)

  1. Marian
    Member

  2. robertbrown
    Member

    I am opposed to classifying Pluto as a planet. I think oddball objects such as Pluto ought to be considered something different.

    Marian, that was a weird article you linked to. Whoever wrote it must have needed a levity break. Thanks for sharing.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  3. Greg
    Member

    This might qualify as news from an alternate solar system.

    The Great Martian War: http://vimeo.com/107454954

    Closer to home, there will be an odd lunar eclipse event tomorrow at sunrise, if you're in the right location:

    http://news.yahoo.com/total-lunar-eclipse-wednesday-rare-selenelion-132704595.html?soc_src=mediacontentstory

    Posted 3 years ago #
  4. Greg
    Member

    re: The Great Martian War

    The sooty blasts of exhaust from the invader's war machines are a nice retro touch. Evidently they've come for our fossil fuels. And what would any interplanetary conflict be without zeppelins and gas masks?

    Posted 3 years ago #
  5. geoffhart1962
    Member

    Speaking of Pluto's status:
    http://www.geoff-hart.com/resources/2007/names.htm

    Posted 3 years ago #
  6. robertbrown
    Member

    Images of Mercurial Ice:

    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-29644406

    Posted 3 years ago #
  7. geoffhart1962
    Member

    Apparently Hell may not yet have frozen over, but Mercury has... at least in places. Isn't it odd that ice can persist that close to the Sun? That's just impossibly cool. Someone has to turn that into a story.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  8. Greg
    Member

    It seems very odd. With half of Mercury hotter than a blast furnace, I would have thought the crust would conduct enough heat to cause ice to evaporate into the vacuum of space.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  9. robertbrown
    Member

    There's a millennial Purdom story "Romance in Extended Time" set on Mercury, and a Sterling story from a few years back "The Peak of Eternal Light," which are both outstanding, and I think deal with the ice issue at least tangentially--but maybve not--and the extended section of KSR's 2312 set on Mercury is convincing and memorable.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  10. Marian
    Member

    Robert, I forwarded your comment to Tom Purdom and received this response, "Thanks. It's always nice to know you're remembered. That's one of my Casanova stories and Ian Strock will be publishing all four in a book we're calling Romance on Four Worlds, A Casanova Quartet. Tom Purdom"

    Posted 3 years ago #
  11. Chris DeVito
    Member

    Anyone remember Niven's "The Coldest Place"?

    Posted 3 years ago #
  12. geoffhart1962
    Member

  13. Marian
    Member

    A way to be on Venus http://www.astrobio.net/paleblueblog/happy-halloveen-us/

    Posted 3 years ago #
  14. Marian
    Member

    Bears live on the sun! Here's the proof http://www.spaceweathergallery.com/full_image.php?image_name=Philippe-TOSI-tache19nov_1416428776.jpg

    That's such a cool image I just had to share it. Actually, of course, it's a sunspot - explanation go to home page of spaceweather.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  15. Marian
    Member

    Mars throws out yet another little oddity http://www.cnet.com/news/another-mars-mystery-whats-that-circular-island-in-its-lava-flows/

    Posted 3 years ago #
  16. geoffhart1962
    Member

    With a tip of the hat to Marian, who started this thread: "Arf, Arf!" We arrives at Pluto:
    http://gizmodo.com/the-spacecraft-that-will-finally-give-us-a-close-up-vie-1667349922

    Soon we'll see whether it really is a planet. *G

    Posted 3 years ago #
  17. Marian
    Member

    A Christmas comet this year that can be seen with binoculars!
    http://www.universetoday.com/116070/c2014-q2-lovejoy-a-binocular-comet-in-time-for-christmas/

    Posted 3 years ago #
  18. geoffhart1962
    Member

    Beautiful view of Saturn:
    http://sploid.gizmodo.com/spectacular-image-of-saturn-from-above-the-ecliptic-pla-1675126844/+jesusdiaz

    The "hexagon storm" is very cool and very weird. It's easy enough to imagine geological features with such sharp edges, but fluids (including atmospheres) tend not to do that.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  19. geoffhart1962
    Member

    Saturn just keeps getting more fascinating with each series of new images:

    http://sploid.gizmodo.com/two-mile-high-structures-rising-on-saturns-rings-1675970218

    Posted 3 years ago #
  20. Marian
    Member

    Mercury's history is also getting more fascinating, though speculative. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26761-mercury-may-be-sole-survivor-of-planetary-pileup.html#.VK7Q7tzn8dU

    Posted 3 years ago #
  21. David the Evil Overlord
    Member

    Chris, yes, I do. I was checking to see if anyone else posted that before I did.

    It was Niven's first professional publication, and IIRC, the science was invalidated between acceptance and publication (when it was revealed Mercury didn't have one face permanently sunwards). But the editor (Stan Schmidt?) said the science was accurate at the time the story was written and accepted for publication.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  22. Marian
    Member

    Remember a few years back when there was talk about a mysterious Planet X. Now there's evidence there may be both an X and a Y http://www.space.com/28284-planet-x-worlds-beyond-pluto.html

    Posted 3 years ago #
  23. geoffhart1962
    Member

    If you remember how hard Charon was to detect, it's not surprising that there will be a great many mysterious planets and planet-like objects found in that area. There's even been some talk of brown dwarfs and the like hoavering just outside the "embrace" of our solar system. Last I heard, we still don't have a really good inventory of the number and mass of all the junk outside Pluto's orbit.

    Every time new measurement technology is introduced, or a new sky survey is performed, astronomers find boatloads of new massy objects -- whole galaxies, for example. This is one reason I have a certain skepticism about the proposed magnitude of dark matter. I have no doubt that something like dark matter exists nor that it accounts for a large proportion of the "missing mass", but I susepct it will turn out to be smaller than currently predicted once we develop better technology for spotting and accounting for all the debris at the outskirts of typical solar systems. Wouldn't surprise me if this debris is a significant proportion of the total mass of any given solar system.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  24. Chris DeVito
    Member

    I'm double-posting this because it's particularly appropriate for this topic:

    Only 100 million miles to Pluto:

    http://www.aol.com/article/2015/01/23/nasa-spacecraft-almost-to-pluto-smile-for-the-camera/21134147/

    In July, New Horizons will reach Pluto/Charon and do a close flyby and take pics (and other measurements) that will -- if all goes well -- give us an unprecedented view of Pluto, which is just a blurry blob even for Hubble.

    . . . Is anyone else thinking of Simak's "Construction Shack" . . . ?

    Posted 3 years ago #
  25. Marian
    Member

    How the Moon would look with true colors http://www.spaceweather.com/archive.php?view=1&day=04&month=02&year=2015

    Posted 3 years ago #
  26. geoffhart1962
    Member

    Lunar transits of Jupiter:
    http://gizmodo.com/in-this-breathtaking-image-three-moons-transit-the-fac-1684115179

    Awesome.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  27. geoffhart1962
    Member

    Phases of the moon, seen from the other side:
    http://io9.com/a-stunning-glimpse-of-the-moons-phases-as-seen-from-the-1684179208/+megneal

    Posted 3 years ago #
  28. Chris DeVito
    Member

    Next stop Ceres:

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4475

    Posted 3 years ago #
  29. geoffhart1962
    Member

    "The Pale Blue Dot" celebrates its 25th anniversary:
    http://sploid.gizmodo.com/today-is-the-25th-anniversary-of-the-pale-blue-dot-phot-1685906760/+jesusdiaz

    Posted 3 years ago #
  30. Marian
    Member

    2016: Mission to Europa to search for life http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26902#.VOdKHstAS1s

    Posted 3 years ago #

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