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3D Technology

(22 posts)

  1. Marian
    Member

    This field seems to be exploding and it's so science fictional, I thought it deserved a discussion. For one thing, I can't recall it being used in old stories. Anyway, here it is being useful in orbit http://www.space.com/28118-3d-printed-wrench-space-station.html

    Posted 3 years ago #
  2. 3-D Printers are the next big thing for SF. Several stories in Hieroglyph used it in varying capacities, especially Cory Doctorow's novella "The Man Who Sold the Moon," an obvious riff on Heinlein's classic story. And I've seen 3-D printing crop up in a growing number of short stories the past year.

    Look for 3-D Printers to figure in a ton of stories in the next few years.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  3. geoffhart1962
    Member

    It's quite an amazing technology. There are already prototypes for 3D printing of food, and the technology is still only ca. version 2.0.

    With appropriate feedstock and a large enough supply of individual elements, it should be possible to print just about anything. By the time we reach version 10.0 of the technology, we might even be able to print individual molecules. Just throw in a batch of gluons at appropriate moments and away you go. *G*

    I expect the biggest limitation for the forseeable future will be an inability to print workable copies of things that require physical rather than purely chemical transformation (e.g., the kind of changes that a metal undergoes during tempering), but with appropriate add-ons (e.g., a furnace and quench), that should eventually be possible too.

    The phrase "this changes everything" has been overused, but for 3D printing, it may actually be accurate.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  4. I don't think anything since K. Eric Drexler's book on nanotechnology hit in the 1980s--and revolutionized SF storytelling--will have the impact 3D Printing will have. I coined the term "nano-magic" back in 1993 when it became apparent that the wonders of nano-tech on a zillion levels was akin to magic--especially for SF writers who would jump all over its possibilities in their stories (and they have, of course).

    3D Printing seems to offer as many possibilities but in an entirely different way. I can't wait for the technology to become more sophisticated--as Geoff writes--to the point where there will be laws against creating certain things. Twisted monster creatures out of nightmare? Little deadly army-things/beasts created in basements like meth labs today (3D Printing Labs)? And unregulated foodstuffs we can hardly imagine? Scary. But there's no putting the genie back in the bottle--or the "ink" back in the printer...

    Posted 3 years ago #
  5. Anonymous

    I'll have a big mac and a small coke. Thanks.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  6. Greg
    Member

    Hmm... The instructions that came with my new replicator warn that it should never be used to replicate additional replicators.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  7. Chris DeVito
    Member

    Saywhat: You want fries with that?

    Greg: Xerox effect, dude. Think about it.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  8. geoffhart1962
    Member

    Saywhat notes: "I'll have a big mac and a small coke. Thanks."

    It will be interesting to see what happens to the fast food model. Most of the cost of restaurant food is marketing, rent/mortgages/maintenance on the property, taxes, and salaries. The food itself has traditionally been a small proportion of the total, which is why portions in American restaurants are so huge. (This greatly increases the perceived value of the meal and robs the high price of some of its sting.)

    I foresee an "arms race" in which companies like McDonalds license their recipes to replicator manufacturers (or distribute them through iTunes *G*) for a small usage fee, and entirely elimnate physical restaurants... or at least co-host them with other restaurants that use the same replicator plus delivery service. There will still be el swanko restaurants with human servants for the rich, because the experience of dining out is important, but only the rich will be able to afford human cooks.

    Kitchen hackers will undoubtedly crack the DRM on the recipes and compete to improve the recipe to its maximum potential, leading to "evolution" that produces optimal recipes for different groups of individuals. Not to mention piracy lawsuits related to copyright for recipes. We're firmly in Cory Doctorow territory here... (If you turn that into a story, please acknowledge the source of the idea. Other than that, I freely release this idea into the collective subconscious. Would love to see what you folk can do with it!)

    Of course, all the McJobs will go away. It will be interesting to see how that plays out: all the knowledge jobs will have long since been exported to China and India, and all the food service jobs will disappear along with manufacturing, so who will employ 150 million North Americans of working age? We can't all become writers, artists, and deep thinkers. We Canadians generally don't own guns, so Wade Wilson notwithstanding, we can't hire out as mercenaries, particularly in the face of competition from heavily armed U.S. citizens. *G*

    Maybe we'll all become subsistence farmers?

    Posted 3 years ago #
  9. We begin to line up to go to the newly 3D-printed Moon hotels...and then Mars and the stars. With 150 million folks with little to do work-wise, we begin to look outward, to expand, to not have all our eggs in one basket as Heinlein warned.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  10. Anonymous

    And the moral of the story is sell McDonals short!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  11. sell McDonald's short!...and get in on the ground floor of some enterprising startup 3d Printer company as soon as they begin offering Initial Preferred Stock...

    And before the G*ddamn gummint gets its greedy tax mitts on them and begins regulating, regulating, regulating and...regulating and taxing them to frickin' death.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  12. Anonymous

    I'll just use one of my off shore accounts.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  13. geoffhart1962
    Member

    Dave notes: "before the G*ddamn gummint gets its greedy tax mitts on them and begins regulating, regulating, regulating and...regulating and taxing them to frickin' death"

    I assume that you've protested against death by taxation by loudly protesting the death of the Fortune 500 companies and continuous and scary mortality rates for all companies listed on the NYSE and NASDAQ, by boycotting use of the Interstate Highway system, and buying your food, pharmaceuticals, and other consumer products only from Chinese companies (where there is neither regulation nor taxation in the Western sense)?

    Good. Didn't want to think this was yet another tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  14. Some taxes and regulations are necessary. Over-taxation and over-regulation takes too _much_ money from individual pockets and over-stuffs the gummint's coffers...and we all know how thrifty gummints of all stripes are.

    Smaller gummint and fewer (unnecessary and wasteful taxes and regulations), say I.

    This is a tale told by many past wisemen signifying everything.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  15. Greg
    Member

    @ Dave Truesdale:

    Very true, but some serious future problems will likely result from the long-standing practice of cutting taxes, and then replicating dollars to make ends meet.

    It doesn't encourage me to know that the whole shaky house of cards is now resting on a foundation of $555 trillion in derivatives. They're nothing more than fairy gold. I've been thinking about putting all of my money in tulip bulbs to achieve some measure of increased safety.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  16. Greg
    Member

    @ Chris DeVito:

    Damn. One more thing to worry about. I was only concerned about geometric progression and rapidly mounting piles of replicators.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  17. geoffhart1962
    Member

    Greg notes: "I was only concerned about geometric progression and rapidly mounting piles of replicators."

    Worry not. The replicators will create tulip bulbs, thereby enriching Greg and providing a solid value-based underpinning for those trillions of dollars of floral derivatives. *G*

    Actually, lilies would be better valuta. For many species, you can eat the bulbs, so come the crash, you at least wouldn't starve. I'm not sure tulips can safely provide sustenance for anything other than squirrels. Though I suppose you could always eat the squirrels...

    Posted 3 years ago #
  18. Marian
    Member

    Creating 3D "ants" with the goal of an intelligent ability to work as a team http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn27248-3dprinted-bionic-ants-team-up-to-get-the-job-done.html#.VRdYpMtAS1s

    Anyone else thinking about the Simak story where it's the ants who inherit the earth after their intelligence is raised?

    Posted 3 years ago #
  19. What If:

    We had 3D printed ants. We had nano-sized AIs. What if the 3D printed/made ants had the nano-sized AIs implanted as their brains. What if the 3D nano-AId ants could communicate via their own AI internet as one communal mind. I'd call this the antnet. :-)

    3D AI-brained ants able to communicate with all other nano AI-enhanced ants via their own antnet.

    We'd be pretty much mega nano-toast.

    Maybe this is something Hannu Rajaniemi would consider tackling, or Rudy Rucker, or Greg Egan, or...

    Posted 3 years ago #
  20. Marian
    Member

  21. Marian
    Member

    The incredible shrinking technology - 3D printer you can carry in your pocket https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23230941-700-print-stuff-on-the-go-with-just-your-phone-and-a-pen/

    Posted 2 years ago #
  22. Marian
    Member

    Aannd a 3D printer goes to the space station. It can recycle plastics and such. https://www.cnn.com/2018/11/17/us/nasa-3d-printer-northrop-grumman-international-space-station/index.html

    Posted 4 weeks ago #

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