Register or log in:

F&SF Forum » Non-Fiction

Front page of the New York Times, 70 years ago today

(12 posts)
  • Started 2 years ago by Dr. Caligari
  • Latest reply from BevanEvansMcdougie

  1. Dr. Caligari
    Member

    Reporting a new scientific breakthrough:

    http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/3321714/posts

    Posted 2 years ago #
  2. JohnWThiel
    Member

    Why does it say "first"?

    Posted 2 years ago #
  3. John, I think when they say "first" it indicates the first atomic bomb they knew of. The test firings in the US were top secret and no one knew of them.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  4. Dr. Caligari
    Member

    Actually, later in that paper (p. 10) it reports on the Trinity test, news which had been embargoed until the Hiroshima bomb was dropped.

    Note the sub-head of the far-right column on page 1: "New Age Ushered."

    Posted 2 years ago #
  5. Steve R.
    Member

    The headline is correct: "The First Atomic Bomb Dropped on Japan; ...". Also the column underneath recognizes that a "trial" bomb vaporized its test tower.

    As an aside, note the column starting out with "Jet Plane Explosion Kills Major Bong". This column, like the column on the atomic bomb, noted that the jet plane ushered in new technology.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  6. at78rpm
    Member

    Here's an interesting alternate history story line: It's July 29, 1914. The Archduke Ferdinand and his wife Sophie have been murdered by Gavril Princip. France and Russia have the bomb, and so does Austria Hungary. Germany wants it, but Emperor Franz Josef didn't trust Kaiser Wilhelm II in the least.

    Nobody does anything, because they know from a previous bombing in the Second Balkan War that the effect of the atomic bomb is absolutely devastating; that the area will be uninhabitable for years to come. Germany forces Austria Hungary to calm down, because, after all, they may have won the battle against Serbia in 1912, but they can't occupy the territory they so wanted because it is radioactive.

    The war scare winds down quickly, and peace is secure. 1915 comes and goes with no further escalation.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  7. Marian
    Member

    Cute idea at78rpm but with a major problem. Marie and Pierre Curie didn't discover radium until 1898. It took WWI to push technology into rapid growth. One example is the development of the airplane from the Sopworth Camel (made famous by Snoopy!) to the development in the Twenties and Thirties enough for a plane capable of carrying the bomb in 1945. And the real issue is the technology to develop the bomb which is what the crash Manhattan Project was all about. This is always the danger of writing alternate history - You have to develop the technology that supports the technology you develop.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  8. at78rpm
    Member

    Marian -- well, the development of the bomb prior to 1914 certainly presupposes some other plane of evolution. But this is why I read rather than write!

    Posted 2 years ago #
  9. Dr. Caligari
    Member

    Official U.S. government report (1946) on the effects of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings:

    http://docs.rwu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1000&context=rwu_ebooks

    Posted 2 years ago #
  10. Dr. Caligari
    Member

    From today's Washington Post, some before and after photos of Nagasaki:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2015/08/09/what-nagasaki-looked-like-before-and-after-the-bomb/?wpisrc=nl_headlines&wpmm=1

    Posted 2 years ago #
  11. Marian
    Member

    http://www.cnn.com/style/article/radium-girls-radioactive-paint/index.html Just ran across this very chilling account of how deadly even tiny amounts of radium were, discovered after it was touted as a health product!

    Posted 2 months ago #
  12. BevanEvansMcdougie
    Member

    ...I'm put to mind, Marian, of an S.J. Perelman mid-Twentieth piece inspired by a glow-in-the-dark " Will You Kiss Me In The Dark Baby? " radium-painted novelty necktie! You glowed in the dark, I saw your spark...

    Posted 1 month ago #

RSS feed for this topic

Reply

You must log in to post.