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F&SF Forum » The Process of Writing

Nov.-Dec. 2015 issue

(50 posts)
  • Started 3 years ago by Gordon Van Gelder
  • Latest reply from C.C. Finlay

  1. Gordon Van Gelder
    Editor/Publisher

    THE MAGAZINE OF
    FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION
    November/December • 67th Year of Publication

    NOVELLAS
    GYPSY -85- Carter Scholz

    NOVELETS
    HOB’S CHOICE -17- Tim Sullivan
    TOMORROW IS A LOVELY DAY -232 -Lisa Mason

    SHORT STORIES
    THE WINTER WRAITH -7- Jeffrey Ford
    THE THIRTEEN MERCIES -49- Maria Dahvana Headley
    HER ECHO -153- KJ Kabza
    THE FABULOUS FOLLICLE -155- Harvey Jacobs
    DREAMPET -171- Bruce McAllister
    CLEANOUT -178- Naomi Kritzer
    IT’S ALL RELATIVE AT THE SPACE-TIME CAFÉ -209- Norman Birnbach
    THE CITY OF YOUR SOUL -215- Robert Reed

    POEMS
    PHASES -65- Sophie White

    DEPARTMENTS
    BOOKS TO LOOK FOR -66- Charles de Lint
    MUSING ON BOOKS -77- Michelle West
    FILMS: YOU ARE ME AND WE ARE ALL TOGETHER -193- Kathi Maio
    BOOKS -199- Elizabeth Hand
    COMPETITION #90 -207-
    COMING ATTRACTIONS -254-
    INDEX TO VOLUMES 128 & 129 -256-
    CURIOSITIES -258- Douglas A. Anderson

    Cartoons: Arthur Masear (16), J.P. Rini (48), Joseph Farris (170), Bill Long (177).

    COVER: “BHEN WAS THERE IN ’75” BY DAVID A. HARDY

    Posted 3 years ago #
  2. SHamm
    Member

    And the first review is already up at Tangent.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  3. Mark Pontin
    Member

    Carter Scholz!

    Also, Robert Reed and Jeffrey Ford.

    Not bad.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  4. Marian
    Member

    Not about the current issue but Michael Swanwick blogged about F&SF as he suddenly acquired old issues. Great cover picture!
    http://floggingbabel.blogspot.com/2015/10/blog-post.html

    Posted 3 years ago #
  5. Dr. Caligari
    Member

    " Great cover picture!"

    Hannes-effing-BOK!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  6. JohnWThiel
    Member

    I notice it's got the old Gummi Bem on the cover. Let's see, I think it was in the eighties this humorous being first appeared. I didn't ever notice who the artist was in its sporadic appearances, and came to recognize the name David Hardy before noticing that he was the artist. Quite a surprising thing to see on a cover.

    I don't see a Bhen on the contents page--maybe that's the name of the Bem. Well, then it was the seventies I might have noticed it. It fact, I think Hardy once posted something about when it first appeared.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  7. Mark Pontin
    Member

    John T. wrote: "....it's got the old Gummi Bem on the cover. Let's see, I think it was in the eighties this humorous being first appeared.

    Nope. November 1975 was the latest it made its debut.
    http://www.isfdb.org/wiki/images/a/a9/FSFNOV75.jpg

    Posted 3 years ago #
  8. JohnWThiel
    Member

    Eh--that's not an up-to-date reply, Mark. Sounds like you hadn't noticed my second paragraph where I updated my comment...many hours before you made yours. Oh, und you say that's the latest--earliest, maybe?

    Posted 3 years ago #
  9. rowsdower
    Member

    No Cowdrey. Whew.

    I am, admittedly, nearly a year behind reading the current magazine. I am not especially fast when it comes to reading and there are other things besides F&SF that I like to read. I've also been delving into my collection of old F&SFs and reading issues sort of at random. Just finished the 10th anniversary issue (Oct 1959) and the November '59 issue and read Starship Soldier (later renamed Starship Trooper) and found it to be wonderful. That Oct. '59 issue was pretty damned good cover to cover. I think there was maybe one story that didn't grab me.
    I also pulled the Oct. '67 issue and the Dec. '69 issue because those were the months my wife and I were born. I also pulled the May '77 issue, the Harlan Ellison special issue, because I am a fan of Ellison despite his prickly reputation (in person he's always been a sweetheart to me) and the 30th anniversary issue from Oct '79.
    All of that is still mixed in with my project of reading every issue consecutively, but I'm still only halfway through 1953. This is a project I may never finish, but it's fun.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  10. JohnWThiel
    Member

    It never seemed to me like F&SF was the type of mag to do an author. I'd expect to see an author special from Howard Browne, but not any of F&SF's editors. Not that I'm saying those author special issues are fictitious, but they're unexpected.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  11. GusG
    Member

    Mine arrived in Oregon today. I am looking forward to a lazy weekend with my new magazine.

    I loved "The Winter Wraith," but I still did not understand the ending, even after reading the last page several times. Help?

    Posted 3 years ago #
  12. Rebecca French
    Member

    One of our checking copies of the Nov/Dec 15 issue arrived in central New Jersey on Friday, Oct 24.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  13. at78rpm
    Member

    Mine arrived yesterday, Oct. 24. I was hoping it would be my first issue to be wrapped in kraft paper, but the publishing world moves slowly...next issue, I'm sure. But kraft paper or no, I've discovered a wonderful way to keep my issues in perfect shape: a Kindle subscription. It's only a buck an issue, hardly unaffordable.

    So far, I've only read the novella. Always love reading the novellas first, and any issue without one is an issue I put off for a while. If Gypsy is any indication of what remains in the issue, it's going to be one of the strongest issues in months.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  14. Rebecca French
    Member

    One of our checking copies in CT arrived today, Wednesday, 10/28/15.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  15. Dr. Caligari
    Member

    Arrived on my Kindle. Looking forward to reading it.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  16. Gordon Van Gelder
    Editor/Publisher

    Sam Tomaino's review of this issue is up at SFREVU:

    http://www.sfrevu.com/php/Review-id.php?id=16505

    Posted 3 years ago #
  17. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    Over on the F&SF Blog, we offer a gallery of all of David Hardy's Bhen covers, culminating with this issue.

    https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/blog/2015/11/04/a-gallery-of-bhen-fandsf-covers/

    Posted 3 years ago #
  18. at78rpm
    Member

    If Gypsy doesn't win the Nebula, I'll eat my space suit. Easily the best sci-fi novella I've read in many, many years.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  19. Chris DeVito
    Member

    Bought a resurrected-tree copy today at B&N.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  20. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    Subscription copy arrived in central Arizona on Thursday, 11/12/15.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  21. eduskunta
    Member

    My copy arrived today - 11-16-15- in Oklahoma City, OK.It appears to be in a good condition. Actually, I do like the clear tape over the mailing label. It makes the label more secure.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  22. Dr. Caligari
    Member

    I just finished "Gypsy," and I agree with at78rpm-- it's a great story. It's got enough hard science fiction for Analog, enough social criticism for the old Galaxy, and enough beautiful prose for F&SF.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  23. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    Dr. Caligari, that's my favorite description yet of "Gypsy."

    Posted 3 years ago #
  24. Dr. Caligari
    Member

    I'm riffing off what a law school buddy of mine advised me in the 1970s: "Read Analog for the science, read Galaxy for the social satire, but read F&SF for just plain good writing."

    Posted 3 years ago #
  25. JohnWThiel
    Member

    They were saying that earlier on, while Analog was publishing stories like "Call Him Dead" and "Double Star".

    Posted 3 years ago #
  26. JohnWThiel
    Member

    It being fashionable to report receiving the issue, I just received mine today, in Lafayette, Indiana. I was surprised because this morning I'd gotten a mail delivery, but it was several hours early and a different mailman and he went around the corner without stopping at anyone else's house, so apparently he was not the mailman, but someone who had had my mail (correctly addressed) delivered to his house by accident. But he wasn't anyone I recognized. He'd brought a LoC and a medicade proposition from an unofficial firm, but the F&SF just arrived. So I'm looking at the famous, or infamous, Bhen cover for this year. Orders to the magazine stands over the registration seal or whatever it is, "Display Until January 4". Only way to get that across to them is to post it on the magazine cover.

    A sort of "Out of Touch" response to the mag, but I haven't had time to look at anything but the adverts, yet I did want to say when I got it. "Wheel of Time" an advertised volume, I wonder if it has anything to do with Persia in Omar Khayyam's time. The advert says it will be required reading for millions of fans. Scholars-to-be? The only place that deals out required reading is the educational establishment. YOU HAVE NEVER BEEN HERE by Mary Rickert also on sale, winner of the Shirley Jackson award, hm, hope for her sake it doesn't come in lottery form. The title is certainly an all-encompassing existential grab. The woman portrayed on the cover looks like she's backing the title statement. All existence must be kept from destruction in KING OF SHARDS, in its way that's even more scope than had in Edward Lerner's DARK SECRET. THE SUBTERRANEAN SEASON, what, Kerouac having his day? It says of it that a man finds a hole in the back of his subterranean office. He must be newly situated and possibly a transient worker if he hasn't seen the hole before. Both Resurrection House books. And it's the End of Everything in the Goodkind novel on the back cover, another in the endless parade of New York Times bestselling science fiction and fantasy authors. This has a Confessor with a desperate gambit; it's a wonder Resurrection House didn't snap it up.

    Well, the received the issue lineup is so sparse I thought I should do some talking upon receiving my copy.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  27. JohnWThiel
    Member

    "It's All Relative..." had me wondering who the intended audience for the story was intended to be. It's so personable that the speaker seemed to be talking to someone, but who?

    "Her Echo" had me wondering, too--what did the writer have in mind with the story? It doesn't say anything much about anything, except that I suppose it says everything about what it's talking about. Perhaps it's an essence of a fantasy story.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  28. JohnWThiel
    Member

    I knew there was having "Hobson's Choice" but don't recall finding out what it consisted of, so I can't compare it with Hob's Choice and pull the irony out of the Tim Sullivan story of that name. I find somebody named Kes in it; I wonder if it's possible that he did not realize or have it called to his attention by anybody that Kes was a character on Star Trek Voyager. If he knows that, seems to me she'd signify something. This story is a sort of farce, it seems to me. It's got that old tautological structure of a supremely advanced technology and a totally degraded culture. I am happy to see the fellow with his mumsy at the end.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  29. JohnWThiel
    Member

    I've been with Robert Reed a long time, through the pages of F&SF. His writing seems partly mundane and partly avant-garde. In "The City of Your Soul" these elements seem in conflict. I wasn't able to see what his outcome was. Both the city and the plane were in another dimension? He seems to be saying "This is you" at the reader.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  30. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    A subscriber reports on Twitter that his copy of the Nov/Dec issue arrived on Friday morning 12/4 in Suffolk, UK.

    Posted 3 years ago #

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