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F&SF Forum » The Process of Writing

Jan.-Feb. 2016 issue

(47 posts)
  • Started 2 years ago by Gordon Van Gelder
  • Latest reply from JohnWThiel

  1. SHamm
    Member

    JohnWThiel--is it possible you are confusing "pragmatic" with "dogmatic"?

    Posted 2 years ago #
  2. JohnWThiel
    Member

    No, it isn't. Not unless "you" is plural. The fellow said what he though pragmatic meant, but I looked it up, and that's the definition I have from the Britannica.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  3. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    Over on Twitter, a subscriber reports that their copy of the Jan/Feb issue has arrived in the East of England.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  4. JohnWThiel
    Member

    Today I read "The White Piano". I liked it much better than most of Gerrold's other works. It had a lot of soul in it, a lot of spirit. Just a wisp of the ghosts involved, though--but it tells more of a story about them than is usual. Some writers of fantasies about ghosts leave a lot of doubt about whether the ghosts suggested in their stories are actual or not, almost crowding themselves out of the fantasy magazine they are appearing in. I wouldn't have expected this of Gerrold, who doesn't see anything odd about interdimensional doings, but he's as tenuous as these others.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  5. RSparkuhl
    Member

    The Jan/Feb issue arrived yesterday in London, Ontario.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  6. dolphintornsea
    Member

    The Jan/Feb issue arrived on the 1st of February in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  7. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    Thank you both for letting us know that the issues arrived. Hope you enjoy them.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  8. JohnWThiel
    Member

    Aha, Troll take it, I will get this issue finished before I get the next one! I've completed reading another story, "Caspar D. Luckinbill, What Are You Going To Do?" This story has a public service to it, that is, making a full and realistic complaint about what's presented on television as well as pointing out how bad the computer is, with trolls and others pushing smut photography and grotesque images of death appearing on the screen. The mass media has indeed gone mad, but people aren't mentioning it much, especially not on the mass media. As the story shows when venturing upon a solution, people get the effect of being single objectors due to poor social communication and the grand blivit existing in the media, but when they realize there are other sufferers that's more of an opportunity for action, which also involves hearing someone else suggesting that people should react. There's something familiar about the author's describing people caught in a mobius effect. The author's attitude may be, solve it or not, you're still where you were at. That attitude seems kind of old to me.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  9. JohnWThiel
    Member

    I just skimmed "Braid of Days and Wake of Nights"; I don't like to read about the developing course of a disease. I see Caligari considered the story painful. This sort of story brings me down when I read it. So I tried another and it was "Touch Me All Over" and it, too, had braids of hair, and a person who wasn't doing all that good a job of keeping alive. They both had the same tone, too. Both had a little upbeat at the end, but it didn't cheer me up much to read it.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  10. JohnWThiel
    Member

    The two remaining stories, "Squidtown" and "Smooth Stones and Empty Bones", had titles that appealed to me so little that I didn't read them. I did glance at them to see what I'd miss, but they seemed to resemble their titles unpleasantly. About the same sort of thing seemed to be happening in both stories. Also they both reminded me of some folk writing, the North story of "High Walker and Bloody Bones" in THE TREASURY OF AMERICAN FOLKLORE, where it says "Rise Up, Bloody Bones, and shake yourself!", and the Squidtown story of the folk song "Squid Jigging Ground" on an Ed McCurdy recording--"There's poor uncle Jacob, his whiskers are spattered with spots of the squid juice that's flying around; one poor little b'y got it right in the eye, but they don't care a hang on the squid jigging ground."

    Posted 2 years ago #
  11. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    Patick Mahon reviewed this issue for SFcrowsnest and called it "a strong start to 2016."

    He particularly liked all three Mars stories, "Smooth Stones and Empty Bones," "The White Piano," "Touch Me All Over," and "Telltale."

    sfcrowsnest.org.uk/the-magazine-of-fantasy-science-fiction-janfeb-2016-volume-130-723-magsazine-review/

    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. iamnothing
    Member

    Thanks to David Gerrold, I was able to obtain a copy. So far, I've only read the E Lily Yu story, but the issue looks promising.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  13. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    A blogger reviews the Jan/Feb issue and was moved by several stories: http://thewiseserpent.blogspot.com/2016/03/reading-magazine-of-fantasy-and-science.html

    Posted 1 year ago #
  14. MattHughes
    Member

    Found another review: http://sfmagazines.com/?p=1151

    Posted 1 year ago #
  15. JohnWThiel
    Member

    That dern barcode makes a magazine look like it is federated in some way. I find none on Galaxy or Analog, September 1970. But I do find it on the 1979 editions. I wonder when that practice originated, and why. Can anyone tell me when it first appeared on a magazine? I assume it's sometime in the 70s and went onto all the magazines at once. Did any of the editors mention it in editorials, and was there any explanation given of them that a reader could see? (referring to the review Matt Hughes linked, apparently an anonymous one.)

    Posted 1 year ago #
  16. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    The first barcode appeared on F&SF with our January 1978 issue, one of David Hardy's Bhen covers. That's around the time it became required for all magazines sold in the US. F&SF's cover designers have tried different orientations (vertical, horizontal) and locations (left side, right side) over the years. Because F&SF commissions almost all of its covers, the artists know to leave a space for the barcode and to plan for the banner across the top. It's part of our design process.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  17. JohnWThiel
    Member

    It's hard to figure what it is, but it seems to have come into being when everything became automated and the government favored that automation, standardized it and established a legal basis for it. Most commodities including food can now be scanned for price and I suppose the scanning machines in stores pick that up. What it's for must be to quickly register its price, the only other thing I can think of that it registers is whether a magazine has a bar code printed on it or not.

    Posted 1 year ago #

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