Register or log in:

F&SF Forum » Other Topics

Rise of the Rocket Girls

(14 posts)
  • Started 2 years ago by geoffhart1962
  • Latest reply from Marian

  1. geoffhart1962
    Member

    No, not a 50s-era SF film, but rather a history of the human "computers" who were at the heart of the new space age:
    https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/04/15/the-rise-of-rocket-girls/

    Posted 2 years ago #
  2. Marian
    Member

    Then in the 1960s, a group of women trained as astronauts but weren't allowed to fly. 1978 was the first time women astronauts trained and were allowed to use their training http://www.space.com/31616-nasa-first-female-astronauts-anniversary.html

    Posted 2 years ago #
  3. Greg
    Member

    Should anyone wonder, the name of the world's first Rocket Girl was Hanna Reitsch. Her rocket-powered ride, seen taking off here, with Reitsch at the controls, was the Messerschmitt 163, which accelerated down the runway to a speed of nearly 500 mph before going vertical and climbing like a bat out of hell. The year was 1941.

    Reitsch also test flew an experimental piloted version of Nazi Germany's V1 flying bomb, in an effort to resolve control problems that plagued the aircraft. What happened during her first flight is dramatized here. I'm really not sure how good the prospects for a successful bail out might have been, with the pilot's compartment only a foot or so ahead of the ramjet's air intake.

    A courageous woman, on the wrong side of the war.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  4. geoffhart1962
    Member

    Alternatives to rockets? http://io9.gizmodo.com/how-humanity-will-conquer-space-without-rockets-1676441431

    My money's on the rail gun concept. Create something sufficiently aerodynamic to get through the atmosphere, site the launcher near the equator amidst a huge solar power farm, and away you go!

    Posted 2 years ago #
  5. David the Evil Overlord
    Member

    I've used something similar in my superhero novel. Our Hero has to go into orbit aboard a spaceplane, and she notes one of the differences between the spaceport and the airports she's used to is the three-kilometre high skeletal cannons that maglev-launch the spaceplanes.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  6. Marian
    Member

    Hidden Figures is a movie (January 2017) as well as a book. http://www.sciencefriday.com/articles/hidden-figures-excerpt/

    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. Marian
    Member

    John Glenn is remembered as one who supported the women "computers" http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory/john-glenn-remembered-hidden-figures-cast-premiere-44123758

    Posted 1 year ago #
  8. Marian
    Member

    Hidden Figures is all about the rocket girls, the human computers. It takes place with the buildup to John Glenn's flight. I had no idea of all that had to be invented. Incidentally, all you mathematicians will love the equations shown as problems are worked out. Completely over my head but showing what was involved right up to the day of the flight. http://www.popularmechanics.com/space/rockets/a24429/hidden-figures-real-story-nasa-women-computers/

    Posted 1 year ago #
  9. CWJ
    Member

    I just saw Hidden Figures (on MLK day) and really enjoyed it. While not the most innovative of films, it has a good story and tells it well. I especially like the nerd (math/computer) parts, and while they probably simplified the narrative for a movie, the math and science is all true. As was the prejudice encountered as well.

    I thought it a better film than The Man Who Knew Infinity, which was in the same broad genre ('true story' of genius going up against prejudice) but I thought Hidden Figures a much better film. Both the science/math and the social struggles felt more organic to the story.

    Recommended.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  10. Marian
    Member

    Not quite a rocket girl but in the general field, Hedy Lamarr, inventor in her spare time, unappreciated in her day but now recognized. Her work led to WiFi. http://www.sciencefriday.com/segments/spreading-the-word-about-the-mother-of-wi-fi/

    Posted 1 year ago #
  11. LukeJackson
    Member

    I recently rewatched the Austin Powers saga. It seems to me that keeping that much firepower in ones bosom presents a grave risk of blowback.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. Marian
    Member

    Third woman to win Nobel in Physics. The first was Marie Curie. http://time.com/5412840/donna-strickland-nobel-prize-physics/

    Posted 2 weeks ago #
  13. Gordon Van Gelder
    Editor/Publisher

    Roslyn Yalow was a physicist but her Nobel was awarded in Medicine, if I'm remembering correctly.

    Posted 2 weeks ago #
  14. Marian
    Member

    Thank you, Gordon. Yes, she was a physicist in Medicine. Here's some more https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-45730921

    Posted 1 week ago #

RSS feed for this topic

Reply

You must log in to post.