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Assorted magazines

(223 posts)

  1. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Interzone #278 - November/December 2018

    http://www.ttapress.com/1988/interzone-278-nov-dec/0/4/

    Sheldon Pacotti takes top honours. Our hero is with Air Force Cyber. We get to meet him on R&R.

    I didn't like Tim Lees' story about a confused war vet.
    I also didn't Like Eliza Ruslander's tale. The point of view character used to be a Mazda... but we are never given details of how the transition to almost human happened.

    Overall a pretty good issue.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  2. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Interzone #278 - November/December 2018

    http://www.ttapress.com/1988/interzone-278-nov-dec/0/4/

    Sheldon Pacotti takes top honours this time. Our hero is a member of Air Force Cyber. We get to meet him when he's out for some R&R.

    I didn't care for Tim Lees' story about a confused war vet.
    I also didn't like Eliza Ruslander's tale. The main character used to be a Mazda... but now somehow lives inside a human man.

    Overall a pretty good issue.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  3. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Apex Magazine #115 - December 2018

    https://www.apex-magazine.com/issue-115-december-2018/

    Jim Marino takes top honours for me. Our superhero is not so super anymore.

    I didn't really care for the stories by Buchanan and Warrick.

    Overall a pretty good issue.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  4. MattHughes
    Member

    Greg Hullender, blogger/reviewer/analyst at Rocket Stack Rank, has some interesting views and recommendations for those who want to read worthwhile short SF and fantasy: http://www.rocketstackrank.com/2019/01/finding-science-fictionfantasy-magazine.html

    Posted 7 months ago #
  5. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Clarkesworld #147 - December 2018

    http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/prior/issue_147/

    Zhang Ran takes top honours with a tale about an ordinary time traveller. This was a new concept in time travel to me.

    I also enjoyed Kelly Robson's story but it was previously published in Asimov's in 2015.

    The rest of the stories were OK. Not bad, but not really good either.

    Overall a pretty good issue.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  6. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading Neo-Opsis #29 - (Dec 2018 )

    http://www.neo-opsis.ca/Twenty-Nine.htm

    August Von Orth takes top honours with 'A Matter of Nurture'. Our heroine learns some unsettling truths.

    J.M. Dover's story was also quite enjoyable.

    The others were OK. Not good. Not bad.

    Overall a pretty good issue

    Posted 7 months ago #
  7. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Amazing Stories - Winter 2018

    https://store.amazingstories.com/product/amazing-stories-winter-2018-premium-edition-paperback-volume-76-issue-2/

    Marina Lostetter takes top honours with 'The Asteroid Contention'. Two rivals find out things are not what they seem.

    This issue also contains good stories by Holtschulte, Kimmel, Novakova, Chinn and Crist.

    Unfortunately it also contains a throwaway non believable story by Lena Ng.

    The feature story by Allen Steele continued to be an almost exact replica of the old Captain Future stories. I haven't found one CF story that I liked yet.

    Overall a pretty good issue

    Posted 6 months ago #
  8. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - On Spec # 109 - (Dec) 2018

    https://onspecmag.wordpress.com/current-issue/

    As far as I can tell 'Joyhound' is Calder Hutchinson's first published story. It's a doozy. Our heroine stays as calm as possible in a trying situation. A very well written story.

    There are also good stories by Onia, Mehrotra and Cole and no bad stories anywhere.

    Overall a good issue.

    Posted 6 months ago #
  9. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Space and Time #132 - Fall 2018

    http://www.spaceandtimemagazine.com/current-issue/

    Rahul Kanakia takes top honours this time. Aliens are among us, but are they really from another star system?

    I also enjoyed the tales by Andrew MacRae and Greg Leunig

    Overall a pretty good issue

    Posted 6 months ago #
  10. digdug
    Member

    Hi Everyone,
    The last entry above concludes my reading of all the Fantasy and SF magazines that were available in a print edition for 2018.
    This includes all issues from the following magazines:
    Amazing, Analog, Apex, Asimov’s, Cirsova, Clarkesworld, F & SF, Galaxy’s Edge, Interzone, Neo-Opsis, On Spec and Space & Time.

    If anyone knows of other individual SF magazine issues that were available in print, please let me know. I am not really interested in primarily horror magazines like Black Static or Cemetery Dance.

    Two stories from 2018 share my award for best story of the year.

    Kristine Kathryn Rusch - The Rescue of the Renegat
    Asimov’s Jan/Feb 2018

    Allen M. Steele - Barren Island
    Asimov’s Jan/Feb 2018

    The following tales also stood out from the rest in 2018 for me.

    Ted Rabinowitz - A Dog of Wu
    F and SF Mar/Apr 2018

    Carolyn Ives Gilman - Umbernight
    Clarkesworld #137 Feb 2018

    C. Stuart Hardwick - Open Source Space
    Analog July/Aug 2018

    William Ledbetter - Broken Wings
    F and SF July/Aug 2018

    Posted 6 months ago #
  11. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Analog - January/February 2019

    http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?700191+c

    Tom Jolly takes top honours this time with 'Ring Wave'. I was reminded of Andy Weir's 'The Martian' at the beginning. In this case a smart young woman must fight for survival. Then the viewpoint switched to a not so likable character and things got more interesting. A wonderful story.

    Auston Habershaw's 'Applied Linguistics' is also a very good story. We get to see the world from a very alien point of view.

    I also thoroughly enjoyed Adam-Troy Castro's latest tale of Draiken.

    There are a total of 20 stories presented in this issue and I count 7 that are just OK and one truly annoying entry. ( Lerner's short short).

    Thankfully these 8 stories were all fairly short so most of the issue was strong.

    Overall a good issue.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  12. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Asimov's - January/February 2019

    http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?700306+c

    Sean Monaghan is one of my favourite newer writers and 'Ventiforms' doesn't disappoint. A mother does what she has to do.

    Also included are fine tales by Jablokov, Wu, Cypess, Palmer and Robert Reed.

    Overall a very good issue.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  13. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Clarkesworld #148 - January

    http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/prior/issue_148/

    This issue of Clarkesworld contains 7 stories and none of them are bad. You would think that it was a good issue. Right?

    I found it frustrating. My Favourite story appeared in Asimov's less than a year ago. Marissa Lingen's "Left to take the lead" is very good.

    Karl Bunker's story is almost as good. The only problem is that it appeared in Asimov's less about 2 years ago.

    Bleah

    Posted 4 months ago #
  14. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Galaxy's Edge #36 - January 2019

    https://www.amazon.com/Galaxys-Edge-Magazine-Issue-January/dp/1612424465/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=galaxys+edge+36&qid=1554769014&s=gateway&sr=8-1

    Charles Sheffield's Tomorrow and Tomorrow continues serialization and it continues to be very interesting.

    My favourite new tale comes from an old writing combination. Malzberg and Pronzini have combined their talents again. This time the story actually involves spaceships and aliens. It is quite good.

    Overall it's a good issue.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  15. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Interzone #279 - January/February 2019

    http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?702590+c

    Sean McMullen takes top honours with another story set in the early 1900's in England. This time our hero is the world's leading authority on reviving newly dead people.

    G.V. Anderson and David Cleden are also along with good stories.

    Overall a good issue.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  16. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Clarkesworld #149 - February 2019

    http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/prior/issue_149/

    A.T. Greenblatt takes top honours this time. A heroic archivist tries her best to save the planet.

    There are other strong stories by Reed, Creasey, Balder, Hefu and McDonald.

    The only annoying part of the issue is that it includes a story (by S. QIOUYI LU) that was in Asimov's a year ago.

    Overall a good issue.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  17. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Analog - March/April 2019

    http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?704999+c

    James C. Glass takes top honours this time. I'm always a sucker for a well told tale about humans exploring a new planet.

    Brendan DuBois is also on hand with a top notch whodunnit set on Mars.

    There are a few stories that are just ok for me.... but they take up a small part of the whole.

    Overall a very good issue.

    Posted 3 months ago #
  18. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Asimov's - March/April 2019

    http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?704992+c

    This is the Gardner Dozois tribute issue. It contains many funny stories and kind words from his many friends. He sounds like he would have been a great guy to get to know.

    As for the fiction, Kristine Kathryn Rusch takes top honours again. As far as I know 'Transport' is not connected with any of her other stories. It has it all.

    Allen Steele is also along with another excellent tale called 'The Lost Testament' that is a sequel to last year's 'Starship Mountain'.

    The only story I disliked was the contribution from Michael Swanwick.

    Overall a very good issue.

    Posted 3 months ago #
  19. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Clarkesworld #150 - March 2019

    http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/prior/issue_150/

    Rich Larson does it again. This time our heroine survives in a gritty future. Clean air is precious.

    Kij Johnson has a good story but it appeared in Asimov's previously. Kai Hudson also has a good story.

    I count four stories that are just OK.

    I didn't like the contribution from D.A. Xiaolin Spires this time.

    Overall a pretty good issue.

    Posted 3 months ago #
  20. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Galaxy's Edge #37 - March 2019

    https://www.amazon.com/Galaxys-Edge-Magazine-Issue-March-ebook/dp/B07P81VYMK/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=galaxys+edge+37&qid=1557968732&s=gateway&sr=8-1

    I liked J.P. Sullivan's 'You Would Make an Excellent Dictator'. Our hero profoundly disagrees with the prognosis from the powers that be.

    Floris Kleijne's 'A Fragment for Father' also packed a punch.

    Rusch, Haldeman, Card and Lackey are also on hand with good stories plucked from their illustrious careers.

    I count ten stories that I liked and five that I found just OK. None were a chore to read.

    Overall a good issue.

    Posted 3 months ago #
  21. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Interzone #280 - March/April 2019

    http://www.ttapress.com/1992/interzone-280-mar-apr-2019/0/4/

    I didn't like the stories by Val Nolan and Sarah Brooks.

    The other stories were OK, but nothing more.

    OVerall an OK issue.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  22. JohnWThiel
    Member

    Interzone is named after an area invented by William Burroughs which appears in his novel NAKED LUNCH. Is there any background on this magazine?

    Posted 2 months ago #
  23. digdug
    Member

    Hi John,

    Here's more info on the magazine.

    http://www.ttapress.com/interzone/about/

    About Interzone

    Interzone was founded in 1982 by David Pringle, John Clute, Alan Dorey, Malcolm Edwards, Colin Greenland, Graham Jones, Roz Kaveney and Simon Ounsley.

    "If there had been no Interzone to be the backbone of the British SF industry, then someone would have had to invent it. Fortunately, this happened"
    Terry Pratchett

    Founding editor David Pringle stepped down in 2004 and the magazine has been published by TTA Press since then, from issue 194 onwards. Interzone celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2007 and is still going strong on a bimonthly schedule.

    "I send my greetings and congratulations to Interzone as it completes a quarter century of publication. That may be a speck of time amidst the eras that science fiction writers dabble in, but staying in business for this long is no mean accomplishment"
    Sir Arthur C. Clarke

    The magazine is regularly shortlisted for prestigious awards, and is a winner of the Hugo and British Fantasy Awards. Many of its stories have also won awards and/or reprints in various Year’s Best anthologies.

    "In my view the magazine has never been better and, on its record, can cheerfully look forward to celebrating its half-century. I expect to join in that celebration"
    Michael Moorcock

    Interzone has helped launch the careers of many important science fiction and fantasy authors, and continues to publish some of the world's best known writers. Amongst those to have graced its pages are Brian Aldiss, Sarah Ash, Michael Moorcock, Bruce Sterling, William Gibson, M. John Harrison, Stephen Baxter, Iain M. Banks, J.G. Ballard, Kim Newman, Alastair Reynolds, Harlan Ellison, Greg Egan, Gwyneth Jones, Jonathan Lethem, Geoff Ryman, Rachel Pollack, Charles Stross, Jon Courtenay Grimwood, John Brunner, Paul McAuley, Ian R. MacLeod, Christopher Priest, Thomas M. Disch, Ian Watson, John Sladek, Paul Di Filippo, Rudy Rucker, Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, Eric Brown, Chris Beckett, Dominic Green, Jay Lake, Chris Roberson, Elizabeth Bear, Hal Duncan, Steve Rasnic Tem...

    "Interzone made me"
    Greg Egan

    We’re still discovering more than our fair share of exciting new talents and publishing some of the brightest new stars around: Aliette de Bodard, Tim Akers, Will McIntosh, Jason Stoddard, Jason Sanford, Hannu Rajaniemi, Leah Bobet, Kim Lakin-Smith, Tim Lees, Karen Fishler, Nina Allan, Alaya Dawn Johnson, Gareth L. Powell, Mercurio D. Rivera, Jamie Barras, Suzanne Palmer, Carlos Hernandez, Daniel Kaysen, Grace Dugan, Rachel Swirsky, Benjamin Rosenbaum, M.K. Hobson, Gord Sellar, Al Robertson, Neil Williamson, Tim Pratt, Matthew Kressel, Sara King and many others.

    "When I first sold a story to Interzone I tried to explain the feeling to a non-genre friend. 'It’s like getting a Peel Session,' I said. John Peel’s Radio 1 show – irredeemably British but with an extraordinarily International passion – still seems like a good analogy to Interzone. Peel of course is sadly RIP, but Interzone is not, and long, long may it continue"
    Daniel Kaysen

    The majority of stories are illustrated in colour by artists such as Warwick Fraser-Coombe, Jim Burns, Dave Senecal, Wayne Haag, Ben Baldwin, Tara Bush, Martin Hanford and Richard Wagner

    "I was fortunate to be featured and profiled in issue 204 of Britain’s Longest Running Science Fiction Magazine. It was a proud moment for me"
    Hugo Award winning artist John Picacio

    Interzone is also the home for a number of popular regular columns such as David Langford’s Ansible Link (news and gossip) and Nick Lowe’s Mutant Popcorn (film reviews). More recently we’ve added Tony Lee’s Laser Fodder (DVD reviews) and comment columns by Nina Allan and Jonathan McCalmont. Every issue contains several pages of book reviews and in-depth interviews. Once a year readers vote for their favourite stories and illustrations. Occasionally we dedicate an issue to a specific theme (eg Mundane-SF, issue 216, the fiction of which was guest edited by Geoff Ryman, Julian Todd and Trent Walters) or a specific author (eg Brian Aldiss in issue 38, Chris Beckett in issue 218).

    "Being a writer of fiction is, for me, a very important part of who I am but the Interzone editors were the ones who first, so to speak, gave me permission to think of myself in that way"
    Chris Beckett

    There’s still so much more to Interzone though, and even though it’s been around for years now, it’s still breaking new ground, and still causing controversy. Interzone is published bimonthly, in the same format and at the same time as Black Static. You can subscribe to the print version using this website's shop, or to the e-edition at various other places such as Amazon, Apple, and Weightless Books.

    "At a time when UK publishers are pinning their fortunes on freaks and footballers, I console myself with the knowledge that the big ideas live on in Interzone"
    Christopher Fowler

    Posted 2 months ago #
  24. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Amazing Stories - Spring 2019

    https://www.amazon.com/Amazing-Stories-Spring-2019-Issue/dp/1799161080/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=amazing+stories+spring+2019&qid=1558920687&s=gateway&sr=8-1

    I liked the stories from R.S. Belcher and Kathy Kitts.

    I didn't like the stories from Criley, Timmins, Gough and Carruthers.

    Overall an OK issue.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  25. JohnWThiel
    Member

    Thanks, digdug. I used the link, looked at the futuristic covers of the magazines displayed.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  26. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Clarkesworld #151 - April 2019

    http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/prior/

    Eric Schwitzgebel takes top honours for me. His tale spans millions of years and still manages to pack an emotional wallop.

    The other stories were all well done with one of them previously appearing in Asimov's.

    Overall a good issue.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  27. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - On Spec #110 - (April) 2019

    https://onspecmag.wordpress.com/current-issue/

    There are quite a few strong stories in this issue.

    Mike Rimar takes top hononurs with 'Strings'. Our fearless protagonists pursue a little piece of their heritage.

    Jeff Stehman's tale about two survivors of the zombie apocalypse was also fun.

    Overall a good issue.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  28. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Space and Time #133 - Spring/Summer 2019

    https://www.spaceandtimemagazine.net/

    Space and Time has a new publisher. Angela Yuriko Smith has taken over from Hildy Silverman.

    This first issue under the new publisher has a different graphic styling but still feels like S&T.

    Clinton Lawrence's story of first contact takes top honours for me.

    Overall a pretty good issue.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  29. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Analog - May/June 2019

    http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?712769+c

    Harry Turtledove has another winner. In this case the picture tells the story. See the attached link for the striking cover art. An obviously intelligent lizard/dinosaur is carrying a gun. I would love to read more stories in this setting.

    Alec Nevala-Lee who has gained notoriety for his wonderful non-fiction work proves that he can tell a very interesting fictional story as well. Our protagonist asks more questions than her sisters do.

    I didn't care for the short story from Joe McDermott but otherwise the issue was strong.

    Overall... a very good issue

    Posted 1 month ago #
  30. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading - Asimov's May/June 2019

    http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?714074+c

    Bill Johnson's 'Unfinished Business' takes top honours for me. It has that old sensawunda.

    Sean Monaghan is along with another typically emotional tale.

    Carrie Vaughn's 'Gremlin' is also really good.

    Overall a very good issue.

    Posted 1 month ago #

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