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Gardner Dozois, RIP

(13 posts)
  • Started 4 months ago by Marian
  • Latest reply from MattHughes

  1. Marian
    Member

    I have very sad news. Gardner Dozois passed away today, May 27th. I hope this means he has joined his wife. For any who don't know, he was editor of Asimov's Magazine for umpteen years. I and all who were on the old Asimov's Forum knew him from there, a wonderful personality. I really don't know what to say at this point and I have no information. You can check his Facebook page as the news spreads.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  2. Marian
    Member

    From Locus Magazine "
    We are very sad to report that Gardner Dozois has died. A full obituary will be posted here soon.
    From Michael Swanwick’s facebook: “It is my sad duty to note the passing of Gardner Dozois today, Sunday May 27, at 4:00 p.m. The cause was an overwhelming systemic infection. Gardner had been hospitalized for a minor illness and was expected to be released shortly. The decline was swift. He died surrounded by his family."

    Posted 4 months ago #
  3. Dr. Caligari
    Member

    He wrote some wonderful stories for F&SF, especially "A Dog's Story" (July/ August 2017). He will be missed.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  4. MattHughes
    Member

    I wish I'd been able to meet him in the flesh. He bought several stories from me and was always a pleasure to work with. His death leaves a large hole in the SF world and I can't think of who will fill it.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  5. Ron
    Member

    This is sad for me. I never met him in person, but I (and others) interacted with him at the old Asimov's forum. I felt gratified and encouraged that he seemed to find my posts there interesting; he usually commented on the threads I started or commented on my comments.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  6. Mark Pontin
    Member

    Nice guy.

    Personal story: I was involved behind the scenes with making those MIT TECHNOLOGY REVIEW-published TWELVE TOMORROWS science fiction mags/anthologies happen a number of years back.

    I decided that I wanted a Greg Egan story for that first TWELVE TOMORROWS. So I emailed Gardner -- who didn't know me from Adam except for a few brief exchanges on some ASIMOVS forum comments threads -- and he trusted me with Egan's contact info, when Egan was in a particularly autistic period of not writing and not being in contact with people. Then later Gardner emailed me out of the blue and told me 'Oh, I thought you'd like to know that I'm buying that Egan story 'Steve Fever' for my next YEARS BEST collection.' Additionally, Gardner put me in touch with David Marusek so MIT TECH REVIEW could commission a Marusek story, 'Osama Call Home,' which Gordon van G. later repurchased and republished here in F&SF at the end of 2007.

    A lot of people got their first hit of what good science fiction could be from a book or magazine edited by Gardner. He did thirty-five of his YEARS BEST collections. (And IIRC I think there were five years before that where he did the WORLD'S BEST SF for either Wollheim or Del Rey.) During his seventeen-year stint as ASIMOVS editor he won the Hugo for Best Professional Editor fifteen times, and also bought a lot of the early, best work of W. Gibson, Kim Stanley Robinson, Lucius Shepard, B. Sterling, and pretty much everybody who started out in the 1980s and is a big dog today -- as well as a bunch of people who didn't get as big, but were just as good writers.

    Like Matt Hughes says above, his death leaves a big hole in SF.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  7. dolphintornsea
    Member

    In fact, Gardner produced a round forty best-of-year anthologies. Before The Year's Best Science Fiction, he also edited the final five volumes of a series published by Dutton, and initially edited by Lester del Rey.

    These, together with his three Modern Classics anthologies, the two Good Stuff books, and the four large themed anthologies he produced around the turn of the century (Explorers, Furthest Horizon, Worldmakers and Supermen) are as good a core catalog of modern SF as any editor has ever produced.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  8. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    Other people knew Gardner Dozois better, sold more stories to him, or collected more rejections. But, through F&SF, I have the distinction of publishing most of his new fiction over the past few years. He had a wide range as a writer, and a deep pool of empathy. I can't emphasize enough how rare both traits are. His voice will be missed by the field. Personally, I will miss his stories.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  9. ThatJoshJerez
    Member

    It has been a sad year thus far for Sci Fi and Fantasy. May the blessing of God be amongst him and remain with him always.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  10. David the Evil Overlord
    Member

    I was just over at the SFF Chronicles forum.

    There, fellow Asimov's forumite Alex The Great And Terrible described Gardner better than anything I could attempt; friendly, witty, silly, and naughty, yep, that was him. And Alex and another Asimov's forumite J-Sun both said Gardner was happily being friendly, witty, silly and naughty with us mere mortals.

    Those days on the Asimov's forum, with Gardner, convinced me that I could write. So, if you're looking down on us mere mortals from the afterlife, Gardner, all I can say, sir, is it's all your fault. :)

    Posted 4 months ago #
  11. Marian
    Member

    A final word from Michael Swanwick (with many photos) http://floggingbabel.blogspot.com/2018/07/eight-pictures-from-memorial.html

    Posted 3 months ago #
  12. Marian
    Member

    This from Rich Horton at Locus Magazine: Just as I was preparing this month’s column I heard the stunning news of the hospitalization, rapid decline, and death, of my colleague here at Locus, Gardner Dozois. Gardner was not just my colleague, both as Locus short fiction columnist and as anthologist, he was a friend. He treated me from the first as an equal, as I surely was not; always happy to discuss the field, to discourse upon and debate about its history. In person he was famously open and almost boisterous, and always gracious and accepting, self-deprecating to a fault. We remember, as we should, his remarkable career as an editor – at Asimov’s, of course, and of his long running best-of-the-year anthology series, but of numerous other anthologies, original and reprint, and a strong critical writer as well. We should also not forget his fiction, which was remarkable and is in danger of being overlooked – stories like “Chains of the Sea”, “Horse of Air”, “A Special Kind of Morning”, “The Visible Man”, “Strang­ers”, “A Knight of Ghosts and Shadows”, and his Nebula winners “Morning Child” and “The Peacemaker” prove him the equal of any writer of his generation.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  13. MattHughes
    Member

    George Martin and Pat Cadigan hosted an in memoriam session at WorldCon. Many people shared fond memories of Gardner as an excellent editor, writer, and con phenomenon.

    Posted 2 months ago #

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