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Harlan Ellison, RIP

(6 posts)
  • Started 2 weeks ago by geoffhart1962
  • Latest reply from CarlGlover

  1. geoffhart1962
    Member

    https://boingboing.net/2018/06/28/rip-harlan-ellison.html

    A fascinating character, and one of the few writers who reliably wrote stories with lines I can never forget.

    Not always a nice person, but as Cory Doctorow notes, each of us must decide just how much we are willing to dissociate the artist from their art.

    Posted 2 weeks ago #
  2. Tremendously sad news. Back in the mid-to-late 1990s when Tangent was still a print magazine Harlan sent me a letter that Charles Brown at Locus refused to publish. Of course, we ran it. In 1978/79 when I and David Gerrold did the Starlog SF Yearbook, Harlan wrote one of the special articles for me, and for the 50th Anniversary of F&SF, as editor of the SFWA Bulletin I asked Harlan if he would write something special for the inside rear color cover. He wrote a wonderful appreciation that I'm sure Gordon remembers.

    Also from back in the 1990s when Tangent was still a print magazine, we'd of course get to review a Harlan Ellison story in this or that magazine. Harlan got in the habit of actually calling me on the phone about the review he'd gotten (the first time freaked me out; I was scared he was going to yell at me or something). But no, he was always nice and wanted to know the phone number of the reviewer so he could call to thank them. This happened maybe 3 or 4 times. From the second phone call on, after I'd hang up from Harlan, I'd dial the reviewer's number as quickly as I could and simply say, "Get ready for incoming from Harlan about your review!" Of course, I didn't tell them whether Harlan was going to shout at them or praise them, such was my twisted sense of humor. :-)

    Posted 2 weeks ago #
  3. ThatJoshJerez
    Member

    Here is a retrospective by Nick Mamatas, it's a bit older but still a good article.

    https://thesmartset.com/article01271401/

    Posted 2 weeks ago #
  4. Marian
    Member

  5. at78rpm
    Member

    I saw him one day back in the '70s when he wrote a story sitting in a shop window. Upon completion, he read it to a small group of us. "Shatterday", it was called.

    Posted 2 weeks ago #
  6. CarlGlover
    Member

    I never met Harlan, so I have no personal memories to relate. But I felt as though I knew him through the wonderful short stories that brightened my Golden Age. His talent was immense but, like many genuinely creative people, so were his quirks and foibles. It would be trivial and condescending, but perhaps true, to say these were just attempts to conceal inner feelings of inadequacy and inferiority. I have always preferred to see him as an essentially pathological borderline personality disorder, of the sort that can wreck havoc in interpersonal relationships. But, so what? In the end, it's only the stories that should matter to most of us.

    Posted 2 weeks ago #

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