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Library of America American SF: Eight Classic Novels of the 1960s

(3 posts)
  • Started 8 months ago by Mark Pontin
  • Latest reply from dolphintornsea

  1. Mark Pontin
    Member

    Anybody who goes in a bookstore is probably familiar with the ritzy black-jacketed Library of America (LOA) series, in which the likes of Melville, Twain, Roth, Bellow, and other notable American authors have been officially enthroned in high-class editions 'for the ages.' One knew Elmore Leonard and P.K. Dick had officially arrived, for instance, when they got their curated multi-volume LOA editions.

    A couple of years or so back Gary Wolfe edited an AMERICAN SCIENCE FICTION OF THE 1950s two-volume edition in which he showed remarkable good taste by selecting the novels you can see here--
    https://www.loa.org/books/373-american-science-fiction-nine-classic-novels-of-the-1950s-boxed-set

    Now Wolfe has got another LOA set coming out.
    https://www.loa.org/news-and-views/1470-forthcoming-fall-2019

    And, generally, Wolfe has shown as much acumen here as the first time around.

    AMERICAN SCIENCE FICTION: EIGHT CLASSIC NOVELS OF THE 1960s (two volumes)
    Gary K. Wolfe, editor

    Volume 1: Four Classic Novels 1960–1966
    Poul Anderson, The High Crusade
    Clifford D. Simak, Way Station
    Daniel Keyes, Flowers for Algernon
    Roger Zelazny, . . . And Call Me Conrad [This Immortal]

    Library of America #321 / ISBN 978-159853-501-3

    Volume 2: Four Classic Novels 1968–1969
    R. A. Lafferty, Past Master
    Joanna Russ, Picnic on Paradise
    Samuel R. Delany, Nova
    Jack Vance, Emphyrio
    Library of America #322 / ISBN 978-159853-502-0

    Boxed set: ISBN 978-159853-635-5
    September 2019

    I don't think the Zelazny, THIS IMMORTAL/AND CALL ME CONRAD, stands the test of time very well, having reread myself it a couple of years back; LORD OF LIGHT, which needs no help, or ISLE OF THE DEAD are superior Zelazny outings. Similarly, I'd rather have TAU ZERO for the Anderson. But other than that, well-played, Mr. Wolfe. It's great, particularly, to think that Lafferty's seriously idiosyncratic PAST MASTER and Jack Vance's EMPHYRIO -- the Vance book where it's inarguable that he was a real artist -- will be getting some renewed, well-deserved attention after all these years.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  2. MattHughes
    Member

    When people ask me where to start with Vance, I always recommend Emphyrio. It's short, perfect, and quintessentially Vance.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  3. dolphintornsea
    Member

    These are going to be absolutely wonderful. I hope I can dredge up the bucks for the boxed set, to go with the previous one covering the 1950s.

    The Zelazny was, of course, serialized in F&SF, and the Keyes was greatly expanded from an F&SF novelette.

    Posted 8 months ago #

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