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July-Aug 2019 issue

(23 posts)
  • Started 6 months ago by Gordon Van Gelder
  • Latest reply from Winks

  1. Gordon Van Gelder
    Editor/Publisher

    THE MAGAZINE OF
    FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION
    July/August • 70th Year of Publication

    NOVELETS

    GIRLS WHO NEVER STOOD A CHANCE -25 -Deborah Coates
    A STRANGE UNCERTAIN LIGHT -93- G. V. Anderson
    THE LEGACY -141- Albert E. Cowdrey
    THE SLAVE -163- Andrej Kokoulin

    SHORT STORIES

    MIGHT ARE THE MEEK AND THE MYRIAD -6- Cassandra Khaw
    LACUNA HEIGHTS -58- Theodore McCombs
    NICE FOR WHAT -132- Dominica Phetteplace
    PLANET DOYKEIT -206- Eliza Rose
    THE EVERLASTING HUMMING OF THE EARTH -226- Molly Gloss
    THE LEGEND OF WOLFGANG ROBOTKILLER -243- Alex Irvine

    POEMS

    TO SKEPTICS -57- Mary Soon Lee
    MY GHOST WILL KNOW THE WAY -204- Beth Cato

    DEPARTMENTS

    BOOKS TO LOOK FOR -75- Charles de Lint
    MUSING ON BOOKS -85 -Michelle West
    FILMS: SEQUEL, CALIFRAGILISTIC -189- David J. Skal
    SCIENCE: HOW VACCINES WORK -194- Jerry Oltion
    PLUMAGE FROM PEGASUS -199- Paul Di Filippo
    COMING ATTRACTIONS -256-
    CURIOSITIES -258- David Langford

    Cartoons: Nick Downes (84, 203), Arthur Masear (92, 131).

    COVER BY MONDOLITHIC STUDIOS

    Posted 6 months ago #
  2. JohnWThiel
    Member

    Some really nice ladies in the issue.

    Posted 6 months ago #
  3. Gordon Van Gelder
    Editor/Publisher

    Kevin P. Hallett reviews the issue for TANGENT ONLINE, with generally favorable comments and singling out Deborah Coates's story for particular praise:

    https://www.tangentonline.com/print--bi-monthly-reviewsmenu-260/221-fantasy-a-science-fiction/4191-fantasy-a-science-fiction-julyaugust-2019

    Posted 6 months ago #
  4. alnico357
    Member

    Got the issue today (6/10) in Arkansas. Nice cover!

    Posted 6 months ago #
  5. SHamm
    Member

    Glad the Tangent reviewer was able to resolve the debate as to whether Kokoulin's story contained any speculative elements.

    Posted 6 months ago #
  6. JohnWThiel
    Member

    Received mine today. Seems like it will be a good issue, one I will like. Everything on the contents page looks highly readable. From the title of the novelet (spell-check disputes your spelling)by Deborah Coates and the text of Dominica Phetteplace's story I wonder if all the ladies on the contents page will be telling it like it is for the female gender. That seems to be a big topic these days.

    Posted 6 months ago #
  7. eduskunta
    Member

    Received mine today, June 13, in Oklahoma City, OK. Wow.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  8. at78rpm
    Member

    Theodore McCombs' Lacuna Heights made me feel as if I were reading a Philip K. Dick story for the first time. That feeling of not knowing what is a real thought: it makes this story, for me, one of the strongest stories I've come across in F&SF, and this in a year of many good issues.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  9. at78rpm
    Member

    Good story by Cowdrey, too. There are some genuinely (and eloquently) spooky parts here, and it all comes together rather like the dream of a Bacchanalian dance. This story will keep you reading through to the end.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  10. Greg
    Member

    Excellent cover art! Here's a link to a much larger image:

    http://www.mondolithic.com/?p=7092

    Posted 5 months ago #
  11. JohnWThiel
    Member

    I think I've read all of Dominica Phetteplace's stories, and they seem to have no cultural relevance to the theme of computerization found generally in science fiction. She portrays a computerized and technologically augmented pseudo-prostitution and has been writing about it progressively. Noting that she lives in the Bay area, I think she is writing mostly about the prostitution found in the San Francisco "tenderloin" area. The prostitution techniques there fully correspond to what she describes. Apparently Bay Area fandom has never tried to look her up or find out anything about her, even though her location was pointed out in an intro in Asimov's. Her stories are complaints about this kind of thing, and though they seem dispassionate appraisals, there's a passion visible in the fact that she uses all methods of getting things across in her stories--satire, nihilism, dissent, disengagement, interruption, avant-garde stylistics and viewpoints, cryptic methods, the works. In the one in this issue, she shows a revolutionary attitude not stated in any previous stories, and identifies it in the punch line at the end of the story, where she and her nihilist companion have adopted a sort of slogan which sounds weak, but it's right in place.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  12. JohnWThiel
    Member

    Thanks, Greg, for the link to the image. I have a mailing sticker as well as the sales code obscuring the bottom of the cover, and the image brought a complete picture.

    Still seeing what the women have to say, my next adventure tour into reading was Cassandra Khaw's "Mighty Are the Meek and the Myriad", nonplused because Myriad is usually a form of adjective, but reading the story I found that the author has her own grammatical usages based on an avant-garde conceptualization put to its place in the passages of the story. But the opening buffeted me--who are "they"? What treaty? Whose small voice proffered a demurrer? And thereafter it was plain that these questions would not be answered real soon, if at all. The tone of a solipsistic omniscience taking a scan elevated my appraisal of what was being scanned and I found a totality of computerization and robotization which precluded any clear take on anyone's part of what was in progress in the world or any cogent progression of thought relating to affairs. Now I saw what the writer was expressing, and I was into the swing of the story, on the whole a controversial one with a continuous complaint voiced that involved the nine-to-five existence being cannibalized into a larger whole. Britain vs. the United States--the conflict seems to be pulled out of a hat, but you never know about those things for sure. No fail-safe here, the détente is on the desk-and-coffee level. If asking for an end-times saga, I got one with this story. Referring back, I don't think name tags are describable as paraphernalia. I see you asked her for a robot story to go along with the cover, which was surprising as you'd only had one story before by her yet she was a stable contact. But I'll be getting around to the other robot story as soon as I finish with the stories by ladies.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  13. JohnWThiel
    Member

    I forgot to mention, I like the Amazing Stories effect of the cover--the blurb saying "Robots Invade!" and then the two stories having that in it.

    Molly Gloss' "The Everlasting Humming of the Earth" seems at first to have nothing in it, and then it dawns on me the reader that it relates to the poet's "This is the way the world ends, not with a bang but with a whisper." There's both in this story. Verifying what one senses, that there are allusions in the story, the Earth moving beneath lovers is a thought from a Hemingway story and the fellow saying "Nada" recalls Hemingway's "A Clean Well-Lighted Place". (The author makes a lot of references with the clear assumption that the reader will have heard of what she mentions. and they will if they're in a literary in-group which had death as one of its concerns.) The title of the story is reminiscent of Yeats ("The Second Coming" is his work in this mode). All in all, a very literary read. I can dig the small-talk, coffee-klatch air to the story.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  14. JohnWThiel
    Member

    Hm, just hit "blog" by accident and found your interviews, with Molly Gloss being interviewed. I'll have to keep with those interviews, this one added dimension to my take on her story.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  15. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    Sam Tomaino reviews this issue for SFRevu. He likes most of the stories in this issue and says that "A Strange Uncertain Light" by G. V. Anderson "will be on my Hugo Short List for Best Novelette next year." http://www.sfrevu.com/php/Review-id.php?id=18640

    Posted 4 months ago #
  16. JohnWThiel
    Member

    That WAS a good one. I'll comment on it in a separate topic. In the meantime, still reading what the women have to say, "Girls Who Never Stood A Chance" seems to extrapolate current social problems with a base in nature, and the disastrous background is indeed current, not that much extrapolated, in fact, people are going around whining about dragons and such here in real life. There's people they call dragons. People have skull stickers pasted on their vehicles and jackets, and the behavior of the youths is similar to that in the story, the guys don't relate to the girls real well, but they gang with them. So the story has an uncomfortable truth to it for me. Sociology seems to provide science for the story. The stuff in the story goes on on Facebook, too. Not far from reality, that Deborah Coates. Eliza Rose's name reminds me of a song that goes "Liza Rose I'm home again Rose, without a sweetheart to my name". She seems to be fully into a sociological outlook too. It seems to recall the suffering of the Jewish people in the wilderness; one can understand that the hurt suffered by these people is great. Matter for thought here. To Mary Soon Lee I'd say that skeptics have always seemed to me to be people who can't be convinced of a new scientific discovery in spite of all proofs. The world mentioned in her poem doesn't offer proofs. Beth Cato's poem goes well with Molly Gloss's story, the mystic with insight set apart existentially from existence. I have seen the form of magic stressed by the poem in several stories in F&SF but don't know what it would be called. It seems to date from the stone age.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  17. Ron
    Member

    SHamm: Glad the Tangent reviewer was able to resolve the debate as to whether Kokoulin's story contained any speculative elements.

    Ron: Yet, still no review of the Plumage from Pegasus story, which usually has speculative elements.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  18. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    Reviewer Alex Brown picked his 10 favorite Must-Read Speculative Short Fiction stories for the month of July. His list includes "Mighty Are the Meek and the Myriad" by Cassandra Khaw from the Jul/Aug issue of F&SF.

    https://www.tor.com/2019/07/31/must-read-speculative-short-fiction-july-2019/

    Posted 4 months ago #
  19. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    Gary Tognetti at the blog 1000yearplan also included "Mighty Are the Meek and the Myriad" by Cassandra Khaw from the Jul/Aug issue of F&SF in his list of best stories for July.

    https://1000yearplan.com/2019/08/01/the-best-short-sff-of-july-2019/

    Posted 4 months ago #
  20. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    Over on the Barnes & Noble blog, Maria Haskins selects her favorite stories from July. Her list includes "Lacuna Heights" by Theodore McCombs from the Jul/Aug F&SF.

    https://www.barnesandnoble.com/blog/sci-fi-fantasy/sci-fi-fantasy-short-fiction-roundup-july-2019/

    Posted 4 months ago #
  21. digdug
    Member

    Just finished reading this issue.

    G.V. Anderson takes top honours for me. Our two heroines make things happen in the end.

    I also quite enjoyed Deborah Coates tale. Misfits find their strength in the strangest times.

    Overall a good issue.

    Posted 3 months ago #
  22. C.C. Finlay
    Charles Coleman Finlay

    Rich Horton reviews this issue for Locus.

    https://locusmag.com/2019/09/rich-horton-reviews-short-fiction-fsf-interzone-and-amazing/

    Posted 3 months ago #
  23. Winks
    Member

    A Strange Uncertain Light was so solid a read. I didn't care it was gothic and horror. Bronte should have been this good!

    Posted 2 months ago #

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