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Favorite works by Philip K. Dick

(55 posts)
  • Started 9 years ago by BrianJackson
  • Latest reply from at78rpm

  1. BrianJackson
    Member

    'Three Stigmata' or 'Flow My Tears', I can't decide.

    I also like 'Crap Artist' and the uh, 'Literary & Philosophical Writings of' collection.

    They should put out the 'Exegesis', complete.

    What's your favorite Dick?

    Posted 9 years ago #
  2. Anonymous

    Dr. Bloodmoney.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  3. Anonymous

    As it happens, I'm rereading Eldritch and Martian Time-Slip right now. I'd be rereading Bloodmoney but I feel I'm pretty close to knowing it by heart, so I've cast back to some I remembered loving years ago but don't remember quite as well. It's a tricky thing to get back into reading PKD though. His stuff leaks out of the books.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  4. BrianJackson
    Member

    MarcL-

    >His stuff leaks out of the books.

    Dude, you said a mouthful.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  5. Annie
    Member

    I am not a big fan of Philip K. Dick -- which does not mean that I do not think that he writes well, it's just not my author. With this being said, I "The Man in the High Castle" is one of my favorite novels from a very long time.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  6. BrianJackson
    Member

    Good choice, Annie.

    I also like "Now Wait For Last Year".

    Brian J.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  7. JordanHartnett
    Member

    My favorite Dick is "A Scanner Darkly." My favorite Dick stories are: "Autofac" and "The Cosmic Poachers."

    I liked the movie 'A Scanner Darkly.' They did a great job in casting for the movie.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  8. MilesMcNerney
    Member

    Novel: Ubik
    Story: "What the Dead Men Say"

    So many other good ones, though. Palmer Eldritch, Man in the High Castle, Now Wait For Last Year, Radio Free Albemuth, VALIS; also fond of Eye in the Sky.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  9. BrianJackson
    Member

    I didn't like 'Radio Free Albemuth'.

    I'm just sayin'.

    I had finished 'Valis', 'Divine Invasion', and 'Transmigration' back to back and it just felt like more of the same, just thrown in a blender.

    Plus, my paperback copy was coming apart as I read it. Pages were coming off the binding as I turned them, and that was annoying me. Maybe I should give it another chance.

    Brian Jackson

    (Now, if I can just find all those loose pages...)

    Posted 9 years ago #
  10. hamsterking
    Member

    Sometimes one Dick just isn't enough, sometimes you need Moorcock.

    I've only read Ubik and the Solar Lottery by Dick, but I like both. I started on A Scanner Darkly, and so far it seems even better than the two I listed. Then, I plan to read Hawkmoon by Moorcock.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  11. Anonymous

    I just finished rereading Palmer Eldritch, and it's pretty good but still not nearly my favorite. Must've been amazing when it came out in '64 though.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  12. BrianJackson
    Member

    hamsterking-

    Get 'The Final Programme' for some of Moorcock's best. His Jerry Cornelius stuff is my favorite.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  13. galaxie500
    Member

    I'm just rereading Ubik and find it extremly good as most of his novels. I have to say that I like his novels better than his short stories, and that's pretty rare for me. I don't think that his short stuff sucks, au contraire, it's better than most of the contemporaries, but his novels are just great.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  14. BrianJackson
    Member

    Most PKD:

    Hey look at the world I live in; wait! It isn't the world I thought it was at all. The end.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  15. galaxie500
    Member

    Yes, there are similarities, but not all of the books are the same.
    Man in the HIgh Castle, Galactic Pot Healer and some others are very different.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  16. Anonymous

    Galactic Pot-Healer is the one I pick up every decade or so, chuckle over the opening sequence, think, "Maybe this isn't so bad after all," and eventually throw across the room. I've never been able to finish it, so now I celebrate that fact with a ritual.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  17. galaxie500
    Member

    Galactic Pot-Healer isn't that bad actually. It certainly isn't among Dick's 10 best novels, but it gets better later, trust me.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  18. harpal
    Member

    my favorite are Flow my Tears
    Man in the High Castle
    Do Androids dream of electric Sheep
    Martian Time-slip
    A Scanner Darkley

    Posted 9 years ago #
  19. BrianJackson
    Member

    MarcL's post has got me wanting to read 'Galactic Pot-Healer', which I own and have never cracked. But this month's worth of F&SF, Asimov's and Analog are mother-scratchers. I'm drowning in great reads.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  20. RobinA
    Member

    My favorite is THE MAN IN THE HIGH CASTLE. Period.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  21. BrianJackson
    Member

    If PKD hadn't spent on pot and LSD, could he have afforded steak over horsemeat?

    Brian J.

    PS.) Does anyone who was alive in the 1960's know for sure (as in having firsthand experience of it), that the pot and LSD they did back then was weaker than today's?

    You always hear that, but I imagine the pot would've been essentially the same and that the LSD would've been better and more readily available when it was "fashionable" among the popular culture of the day.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  22. MattHughes
    Member

    Marijuana was much less powerful in the sixties. It was full of sticks and seeds that had to be winnowed out. Compared to today's THC-enriched BC bud, even the vaunted Acapulco Gold was pretty puny.

    LSD is LSD, you either take enough or you don't. Street acid in the sixties was purer, because dealers hadn't got around to cutting it with speed, animal tranquilizers whatever they could find. Hard to believe in today's strictly commercial universe, but most people who made, sold and "dropped" acid in 67/68 thought of themselves as part of a movement toward enlightenment.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  23. BrianJackson
    Member

    That's kind of what I mean. That loaded-with-lumber doobage is still around, in some parts. If you're into that, and not buds, are you running at 60's speed on the psychedelic freeway?

    Or is even today's dirt weed still better than yesterday's 'Maui Wowee'?

    Brian J.

    PS.) I heard they're gonna make a PKD film with Paul Giamatti where he's just crazy on acid in Berkeley in the 1960's, intercut with scenes from his books, like an hallucinogenic "Secret Life of Walter Mitty"

    Posted 9 years ago #
  24. Clint
    Member

    Radio Free Albemuth.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  25. PollutionQThrashbarg
    Member

    Philip K Dick is my favorite author of all time and I don't anyone else will ever take that title. My favorite book I've read by him is "A Maze of Death". Not to say that is his best book, just my favorite.

    I also absolutely love “The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch", "Dr. Bloodmoney", "Martian Time Slip", and "Flow My Tears". I’m such a nerd and die hard dickhead I got 'Persus 9' tattooed on my right instep. (You would have to read “A Maze of Death” to know what that’s all about)

    -Pollution Q. Thrashbarg

    Posted 9 years ago #
  26. JohnWThiel
    Member

    This reminds me of the Dick topic on the Nightshade board's Nightshade topic. That one sure is in a remote, far-away place, now receding in space and time, almost like a setting for a Dick novel.

    Posted 9 years ago #
  27. Steve R.
    Member

    According to the Washington Post, the "Man in the High Castle" will be released on Nov. 20, 2015.

    In the hunt for a new favorite show, ‘when’ might be as crucial as ‘what’ This article also covers other new SF serials such as "Minority Report.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  28. geoffhart1962
    Member

    Have to say, I never got into Dick when I was younger. What little I read wasn't memorable and didn't inspire me to seek out more. (Not making any value judgments here, just reporting the impressions of my teenage self.) Seems like several decades on, I should revisit his works and update my impressions. Will use some of the comments in this thread to target my reading more effectively.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  29. JohnWThiel
    Member

    I'll have to claim as my favorite work of PK Dick the novelette "Imposter", which ends up (I assume the spoiler ban doesn't last forever) with the human bomb igniting with an explosion that destroys the entire solar system. I like this story best for its implications.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  30. Steve R.
    Member

    I was unaware of this thread, but stumbled across it when looking for an appropriate place to post on the television appearance of "The Man in the High Castle". Considering the age of this thread, I was unsure of resurrecting it or simply starting a new thread.

    Within the context of this thread, "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheet" is the most memorable. I would have to look through my book collection to see which story would qualify as his best. I remember being quite impressed with "Ubik" at the time it came out.

    "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheet" was turned into the movie "Blade Runner". The movie and the book are really quite different. The book and movie nevertheless each stand alone as excellent works.

    Of course, I went through the mental exercise of comparing the movie to the book. I think that exercise improved my insight into the book and markedly increased my rating of the book as a literary piece. Both the movie and the book need to be seen and read.

    @JohnWThiel: I saw the video version of "Imposter". It was excellent.

    Posted 3 years ago #

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