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Fake Mystery Magazine Forum

(25 posts)
  • Started 5 years ago by BevanEvansMcdougie
  • Latest reply from BevanEvansMcdougie

  1. BevanEvansMcdougie
    Member

    With Ye Ed's/Mod's permish , natch , I would like to add an ommnibus line regarding mystery/crime/whatevah fiction particularly short fiction of that stripe particularly that which appears in Dell Publicatns' (owners of Analog and Asimov;s) ELLERY QUEEN MYSTERY MAGAZINE and ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S MYSTERY MAGAZINE .
    The Forum section of those mags' joint Web site , The Mystery Place , went down just as Ana. and Asi.'s did , a long time ago now .
    Aside from any " We Are The World "-like " la la la , it's all one big happy world of genre fiction..." sentimentality - Would the name " Anthony Boucher " influence the court here , the esteemed ?

    Posted 5 years ago #
  2. Ron
    Member

    In 1948, the Borges story "The Garden of Forking Paths" was translated into English by Anthony Boucher and published in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine.

    Boucher also translated "Death and the Compass."

    Posted 5 years ago #
  3. JohnWThiel
    Member

    Yeah, it was a putz of all the Dell Forums. Don't know if the trolls had been hitting the mystery forums or not.

    Posted 5 years ago #
  4. Dr. Caligari
    Member

    Many, many SF authors wrote mysteries (Asimov, Jack Vance, Fredrick Brown all come to mind). And there are many SF-mystery hybrids (The Caves of Steel, The Demolished Man). So I think this thread is fine here, for whatever my opinion is worth.

    Posted 5 years ago #
  5. BevanEvansMcdougie
    Member

    ...I have re-subscribed to EQMM , through Speedymags.com , not Dell .
    I also subscribed to DC Comics' epoynomous/
    mothership " SUPERMAN title ( Not Adventures of the the high-priced ~ & hyped ~ Superman Unchained . ) thru them , too , presumably both of them might be able to get by any mail room fu-uh , anyway...

    Posted 5 years ago #
  6. StevenLP
    Member

    I recently bought "Murder in Space" by David V Reed: Galaxy Science Fiction Novel #23 (1954), but originally in Amazing Stories 1944. The SFE says it "attempts to combine mystery and sf techniques" - sadly it apparently does so "unconvincingly"! Don't know if I'll ever get round to reading it (it cost me 80p: obviously I couldn't not buy it at that price!).

    The cover is here: http://www.philsp.com/data/images/g/galaxy_science_fiction_novel_1954_n23.jpg
    worth 80p for that alone: spaceships, space pistols and leatherbound books!

    Posted 5 years ago #
  7. StevenLP
    Member

    I've just finished Margery Allingham's 'The Tiger in the Smoke' featuring her amateur detective Albert Campion. I'd decided to have a go at a Campion novel as Allingham has been highly praised by Michael Moorcock and A S Byatt (Byatt's comments here: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/3669799/A-S-Byatt-Why-I-love-Margery-Allingham.html I couldn't find Moorcock's online, but he takes a very similar line )

    'Tiger in the Smoke' was published in 1952, set in post-war London and is dark in tone. In fact Campion himself does not dominate the book (so much so that when it was turned into a film, his character was cut out).

    It's one of those novels where London and its fog is as much of a character as the people portrayed: the feel is such that it will appeal not only to those who enjoy mysteries, but also anyone who like urban/dark fantasies. It's very good.

    Curiously the real name of the villain - which we only learn towards the end - turns out to be the same as one of those in the subject lines of a currently active thread on the forum!

    The book was part of 15 paperback Allingham's I got for 10p each at a car boot sale. I also bought a couple of Agatha Christies, who I'm not really a fan of, but as the books were 'The Labours of Hercules' and 'The Mysterious Mr Quinn' I thought they were worth a shot. Both are short story collections: the former are Poirot doing variations of the labours of his namesake, the latter are probably bona fide fantasies involving a Mr Harley Quinn, who appears towards the end of a story where a crime/murder has been committed - by remarking on what questions are the key ones he guides people to the solutions.

    Posted 5 years ago #
  8. BevanEvansMcdougie
    Member

    ...The present (Apr. 2014) issue of ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S MYSTERY MAGAZINE has a SF-mystery mixture story called " The Danua Boy " , by Tony Richards . Not spoiling now , but in the story , the SFictionalness comes in at the end ~ Except at the beginning , where a subtle reference makes it clear , once you think about it , that the story is taking place in a Neat Near Future not contemporary times ~ I wonder if the story might've originally been written in a more SF-elements-up-front manner , and those elements brought down from their earlier greater visibility for presentation/publication in a mystery image-branded theater...

    Posted 4 years ago #
  9. Dr. Caligari
    Member

    Michael Chabon's "The Yiddish Policemen's Union" is both excellent alternate-history SF and a fine murder mystery.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  10. BevanEvansMcdougie
    Member

    ...I HAVE BEN GOING THROUGH THEmAY elery

    Posted 4 years ago #
  11. BevanEvansMcdougie
    Member

    ...I have been going through the May ELLERY QUEEN MYSTERY MAGAZINE .
    Brian Tobin's " Teddy " is both touching and gritty and would make a good TV movie !

    Posted 4 years ago #
  12. BevanEvansMcdougie
    Member

    ...I bought the new AHMM and I have something to say ~ anal retentively ~ about an...error ! Placeholder time .

    Posted 3 years ago #
  13. BevanEvansMcdougie
    Member

    ...The July 2015 AHMM has one story , at the very end (the only story I have read as yet) , " THE SEAGULL AND THE SKULL " by William Dylan Powell has a couple of what I believe are anachronisms , both inn vernacular/slang and in pop culture references for a story set in 1981 . This leads into something I have noted , which is that AHMM and EQMM have an odd fondness for printing ories set in the pretty recent past , like th 80s or so , as in this story , a time recent enough that there aren't really a lot of immediately apparent differences between now and then , so you may wonder as to why- But later .

    Posted 3 years ago #
  14. JohnWThiel
    Member

    Mystery/crime/whateveh said two years ago, glad to see it back, though, it's blooming.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  15. BevanEvansMcdougie
    Member

    ...You're glad to see my post back/blooming again , ya means , John W???????????:-)

    Posted 3 years ago #
  16. BevanEvansMcdougie
    Member

    ...Actually , the current AHMM's lead-off story , by Joyce Carol Oates , is really shockingly full of anachronisms for a story that is supposedly a woman in 1987 recalling something that happened in 1961 when she was 14 years old ~ Bob Dylan a well-known musician (to a teenager in JCO's usual stomping grounds of upstate New York) , a garment known as a " hoodie " , Walmart and Wendy's existing , " the war in Vietnam " (uh , it was " advisers " then)...
    Some intentional " cognitive dissonance/unreliable narrator " jive going on from the bigtime litry' star ???????

    Posted 3 years ago #
  17. JohnWThiel
    Member

    Yeh, it was haunting how it went away faw so long.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  18. BevanEvansMcdougie
    Member

    ...I don't believe I'd heard of the late British writer Peter Dickinson , who , while officially a mystery writer , ranged across SF-nal territories ~ But , the NY Times respected him enough to give him an obit , yesterday , Friday .

    Posted 2 years ago #
  19. Gordon Van Gelder
    Editor/Publisher

    We published Peter Dickinson's story "Troll Blood" in the Sep/Oct 2012 issue of F&SF. And we ran a short interview with him: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/blog/2012/10/10/interviewpeter-dickinson-on-troll-blood/

    Posted 2 years ago #
  20. Mark Pontin
    Member

    Peter Dickinson was a great writer who often transcended whatever genre he chose to work in.

    Like Ian MacEwan's ATONEMENT -- only arguably better, IMO -- quite a few of Dickinson's 'mystery' novels approach being great literature by using a thematic approach of having a character (usually 1st person POV) look back from several decades later, and finally understand the truth -- and the horror -- of a particular death (a murder or a suicide) or some other crime in its full social/political/personal ramifications.

    I'm thinking here particularly OF TEFUGA, THE LAST HOUSEPARTY, HINDSIGHT, DEATH OF A UNICORN, A SUMMER IN THE TWENTIES.

    Dickinson was helped in this by having witnessed firsthand and from several angles the passing of a whole world, that of the late-period British empire, starting with the fact that his father was a British colonial officer in pre-WWII colonial Africa.

    There was a time within living memory when atlases showed two-thirds of the world's land surfaces colored pink to represent that those teritories belonged to the British empire or commonwealth. So, whereas MacEwan's ATONEMENT very much has the feel of being cobbled together from other sources, Dickinson _lived_ the passing of that era and that world, and its transition through the 1960s.

    His writing also shows great sympathy and understanding for Africans, women, and other outsiders and underdogs navigating through class and imperial oppression.

    Dickinson himself spoke of being like a science-fiction writer without the science, in that his worlds and set-ups were strikingly thought through. In that vein, some of his YA/childrens' fantasies are pretty good. THE BLUE HAWK and TULKU are novels that anybody can admire, for instance.

    I think I'm going to have to re-read TEFUGA and some of the others in this vein.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  21. MilesMcNerney
    Member

    The Caves of Steel is pretty obviously a mystery; I hadn't thought of Demolished Man previously as a mystery or anything other than science fiction, but of course it really is a suspense story or even a police procedural.

    Suspense-film director Brian De Palma, according to the Wikipedia articles on him and The Demolished Man, wanted to film a version of that novel.

    I suppose the Heinlein novel Door Into Summer fits vaguely in this category, since it deals with the victim of a financial scam trying to get revenge/fix things via time travel.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  22. MilesMcNerney
    Member

    ..

    Posted 2 years ago #
  23. Dr. Caligari
    Member

    "The Demolished Man" is an "inverted detective story":

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverted_detective_story

    Posted 2 years ago #
  24. BevanEvansMcdougie
    Member

    ...I bought Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine - Oh, and FSF!!! :-! -
    for the first time in a while recent-like, Fri. nite, I believe - I think Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine was out of stock, I suppose - I am interested to see this indication that both Analog and Asimov's have at least partly reversed their complete withdrawal from any participation-oriented Web presence, that they have put up blogs.
    What about AHMM and EQMM? I used to be a habitue of their combined The Mystery Spot?? was it The Mystery Place?? site's board - It got the plug pulled on it at the same time as the old " two As"s boards did IIRC, frankly I think in a " to be fair " move by Dell - it didn't't even HAVE a " politics, etc. " basement as the two As did, so there were no thanks arguments IIRC, and it was never as active as either, I believe - I liked it, however:-!.
    Has Dell possibly brought back any manifestation of the MMs' boards?

    Posted 7 months ago #
  25. BevanEvansMcdougie
    Member

    ...I just did subscribe this week to EQMM... and found out, in doing so, that both EQMN and AHMM now have their own, already from each other, dedicated sites, using each nag's name. No more " The Mystery Place-Spot ". Still no boards, however!:-€

    Posted 6 months ago #

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