Obituary: Karen Anderson

Writer Karen Anderson (b.1932) died on March 17. Anderson was married to Poul Anderson, with whom she often collaborated on works such as The King of Ys and The Last Viking, although she also wrote some solo stories. Anderson was active in costuming and is believed to have been the first person to use the term “filk music” in print. Anderson helped co-found the Society for Creative Anachronism.

Obituary: Stephen Hawking

Physicist Stephen Hawking (b.1942) died on March 14. Hawking was the first to set out a theory of cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. He published the popular book A Brief History of Time and has played himself in episodes of The Big Bang Theory and Star Trek: The Next Generation. Hawking has suffered from ALS and was confined to a wheelchair, using a computer to communicate and speak.

Obituary: Mary H. Rosenblum

Author Mary Rosenblum (b.1952) died on March 11 when the small plane she was flying crashed near Battle Ground, Washington. Rosenblum won the Compton Crook Award in 1994 for her debut novel, The Drylands and followed up with several other novels, writing mysteries as Mary Freeman, her maiden name. Her short story, “Sacrifice” won the 2009 Sidewise Award for Alternate History.

Obituary: Kate Wilhelm

Author Kate Wilhelm (b.1928) died on March 8. Wilhelm began publishing in 1956 with the story “The Pint-Sized Genie” and her first sf novel, The Clone, written with Theodore L. Thomas, was nominated for the Nebula Award. She won the Hugo Award twice, including for her novel Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang and the Nebula three times. She helped establish the SFWA and Clarion Workshop and helped run the early Milford Writers Workshops. Along with husband Damon Knight, she was a Pro Guest of Honor at Noreascon Two and was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2003. She received an inaugural Solstice Award in 2009 and in 2016, the awards was renamed the Kate Wilhelm Solstice Award in her honor.

Sparhawk Receives O’Donnell Award

SFWA has announced that Bud Sparhawk will receive this year’s Kevin O’Donnell, Jr. Service to SFWA Award on March 19 at the SFWA Nebula Conference in Pittsburgh. In addition to serving as a director, treasurer and CFO for the organization, he has also advised the Emergency Medical Fund and the Grants Committee and established SFWA’s Financial Advisory Committee.

Obituary: Peter Nicholls

Editor and author Peter Nicholls (b.1939) died on March 6 from cancer. Nicholls is perhaps best known as the editor of The Science Fiction Encyclopedia, which won a Hugo Award in 1980 for its first edition. The second and third editions, under the title The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction also earned Nicholls a second and third Hugo Award when they were released. Nicholls also won the Pilgrim Award, Peter McNamara Award, and Eaton Award. From 1974-1978, he was the co-editor of Foundation.

Bangladeshi SF Author Attacked

Bangladeshi science fiction author Muhammed Zafar Iqbal was stabbed in the back of the head during an award ceremony at a fair organized by the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. In addition to his science fiction, Zafar Iqbal works as an electrical engineering professor and hold several patents. Zafar Iqbal’s assailant has been arrested.
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IAFA Awards

The International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts (IAFA) has announced the winners of three of the awards which will be presented during the International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts in Orlando, FL during the weekend of March 14-18. A fourth award, the David G. Hartwell Emerging Scholar Award, will have the winner announced at the banquet.

  • William A. Crawford Fantasy Award: Her Body and Other Parties, by Carmen Maria Machado
  • Jamie Bishop Memorial Award: Guangyi Li
  • Walter James Miller Memorial Award: Peter Adrian Behravesh

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Tacoma Names Park for Herbert’s Dune

Tacoma, Washington has named an 11 acre park the “Dune Peninsula at Point Defiance Park” in honor of Tacoma-born science fiction author Frank Herbert. Herbert’s most well known novel in Dune, which focused on environmental issues. Despite Dune taking place mostly on a desert planet without water, the namesake park is surrounded by water on three sides. Tacoma has been trying to name the park for Herbert’s work since at least 2013.
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Obituary: Victor Milán

Victor Milán (b.1954) died on February 13. Milán co-wrote the War of Powers novels with Robert E. Vardeman and published his own novels, often using the pseudonyms Alex Archer, Robert Baron, S.L. Hunter, and Richard Austin. He published several BattleTech novels and many novels under the James Axler house name. In 1986, he won a Prometheus Award for his novel Cybernetic Samurai.