Obituary: Noriyoshi Ohrai

Japanese artist Noriyoshi Ohrai (b.1935) died on October 27. Ohrai created the Japanese posters for the original Star Wars trilogy as well as poster art for Godzilla films and other movies. He was an artist for the Metal Gear video game series as well.

Seiun Translated Work Winners

The winners of the Japanese Seiun Awards for best translated works have been announced and will be presented at Sasquan, this year’s Worldcon. The remaining winners will be announced at Comecon in Yonago, Tottori Prefecture on August 29.

  • Translated Long Story: The Martian, by Andrew Weir, translated by Kazuko Onoda
  • Translated Short Story: “The Girl-Thing Who Went Out for Sushi,” by Pat Cadigan, translated by Yooichi Shimada

Seiun Nominees

The nominations for the Seiun Awards have been announced. The translation categories are presented below. The Seiun Awards are the Japanese fan-voted awards and winners will be announced at Comecon, the 54th Japanese National SF convention, held August 29-30, 2015.

Best Translated Long Story

  • The Martian, by Andy Weir, translated by Kazuko Onoda
  • Among Others, by Jo Walton, translated by Takeshi Mogi
  • Redshirts, by John Scalzi, translated by Masayuki Uchida
  • The Dervish House, by Ian McDonald, translated by Masaya Shimokusu
  • Ready Player One, by Ernest Cline, translated by Makiko Ikeda
  • Pathfinder, by Orson Scott Card, translated by Naoya Nakahara

Best Translated Short Story

  • “The Negation,” by Christopher Priest, translated by Yoshimichi Furusawa
  • “The Girl-Thing Who Went Out for Sushi,” by Pat Cadigan, translated by Yoichi Shimada
  • “Hunter Come Home,” by Richard McKenna, translated by Touru Nakamura
  • “Water” by Ramezu Naam,” translated by Naoya Nakahara
  • “For Want of a Nail,” by Mary Robinette Kowal, translated by Fumiyo Harashima
  • “Year of the Rat,” by Stanley Chen (Chen Chu fan), translated by Naoya Nakahara
  • “War 3.01,” by Keith Brooke, translated by Masato Naniwa

For more information… (Japanese)

Seiun Winners

The winners of the 2014 Seiun Awards were announced this past weekend at Nutscon, the 53rd Japanese National SF convention, in Tsukuba, Japan. The Seiun is selected by a vote of the membership of the Japanese National convention.

    Best Japanese Long Story: From Mt.Kororogi, From Jupiter Trojan, by issui ogawa

  • Best Japanese Short Story: “Ima Shuugouteki Muishikio,” by Kosyu Tani
  • Best Translated Long Story: Blindsight, by Peter Watts, translated by Yoichi Shimada
  • Best Translated Short Story: “The Paper Menagerie,” by Ken Liu, translated by Furusawa Yoshimi-dori
  • Best Dramatic Presentation: Pacific Rim, director by Guillermo del Toro
  • Best Comic: The World of Narue by Marukawa Tomohiro, edited by Kadokawa Shoten
  • Best Artist: Naoyuki Katoh
  • Best Nonfiction: DIY Liquid Fuel Rocket by the Summer Rocket team, Asari Yoshitoh
  • Other Works: Nova SF, edited by Nozomi Ohmori

For more information…

Seiun Translation Nominations

The nominations for the Seiun Awards have been announced. The translation categories are presented below. The Seiun Awards are the Japanese fan-voted awards and winners will be announced at Nutscon, the 53rd Japanese National SF convention, held July 19-20, 2014 in Tsukuba Japan.

Best Translated Novel

  • Incandescence, by Greg Egan, translated by Yamagishi Shin
  • Serpent’s Egg, by R.A. Lafferty, translated by Inoue Hisashi
  • Embassytown, by China Miéville, translated by Masayuki Uchida
  • Kraken, by China Miéville, translated by Masamichi Higurashi
  • The Islanders, by Christopher Priest, translated by Furusawa Yoshimi-dori
  • Blindsight, by Peter Watts, translated by Yoichi Shimada
  • Blackout/All Clear, by Connie Willis, translated by N. Omori

Best Translated Story

  • “Final Exam,” by Megan Akenberg, translated by Jun Suzuki
  • “Vacuum Lad,” by Stephen Baxter, translated by Yagauchi Satoru
  • “Christopher Raven,” by Theodora Goss, translated by Jun Suzuki
  • “The Man Who Bridged the Mist,” by Kij Johnson, translated by Misumi Kazuyo
  • “The Paper Menagerie,” by Ken Liu, translated by Furusawa Yoshimi-dori
  • “Palimpsest,” by Charles Stross, translated by Hiroshi Kaneko

For more information…

Hans Christian Andersen Prize

The Hans Christian Andersen Prize was presented ti Japanese author Nahoko Uehashi, whose work is based on ancient Japanese mythology and science-fiction fantasy. The award for illustrator was presented to Brazilian artist Roger Mello

For more information…

Obituary: Ken Utsui

Japanese actor Ken Utsui (b.1931) died on March 14. Utsui is best known for portraying Starman in a series of films in the 1960s, beginning with Invaders from Space. Prior to that he played the title character in six films in the Super Giant series beginning with Sûpâ jaiantsu.

Obituary: Jun Sadogawa

Manga author Jun Sadogawa (b. as Mutsumi Kawahito, 1979) committed suicide on August 13. His debut work, Muteki Kanban Musume, was published from 2002-2006. He followed that up with a sequel, Muteki Kanban Musume N. In 2012, he finished the thirteen volume Hanzasky and had begun to publish Amane Atatameru at the time of his death.

Seiun Award Winners

The winners of the Seiun Awards were announced on July 20 at KOICON, the Japanese National SF Convention, in Hiroshima. The prizes for the translated stories will be presented at LoneStarCon 3.

  • Best Japanese Long Story: The Empire of Corpses, by Priject Itoh X Enjoe
  • Best Japanese Short Story: “Ima Shuugouteki Muishikio,” by Chohei Kanbayashi
  • Best Translated Long Story: The Android’s Dream, by John Scalzi, translated by Masayuki Uchida
  • Best Translated Short Story: “Pocketful of Dharma,” by Paolo Bacigalupi, translated by Hiroshi Kaneko
  • Best Dramatic Presentation: Bodacious Space Pirates, directed by Tatsuo Sato
  • Best Comic: Inherit the Stars, by Yukinobu Hoshino
  • Best Artist: Kenji Tsuruta
  • Best Nonfiction: Offprint of The Present and Future of CGM: The World Opened Up, by Hatsune Miku, Nico Nico Douga, and PIAPRO” from the May 2012 issue of IPSJ Magazine
  • “Free” Section: iPS cells, CiRA Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University

Montreal Joins 2017 Race

A group of fans have announced that they will bid to host the Worldcon in 2017 in Montreal, Canada. Japan has already announced a bid for that year. The last Japanese Worldcon was Nippon in 2007. The last Montreal Worldcon was Anticipation in 2009.